Is this book good?

Is this book good?

Shopping Cart Returner Shirt $21.68

Yakub: World's Greatest Dad Shirt $21.68

Shopping Cart Returner Shirt $21.68

  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It's the basics of a pseudoscience, but it's pontificating obfuscation of the systemic evils.
    It's exactly like watching MSM news feeds

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      But enough about Marxism..

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        in other words, the israelites are behind it all

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      You said absolutely nothing meaningful nor substantive.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      sweet bombast

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      how much was your college tuition to learn how to say absolutely nothing while using buzzwords?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Have logic just like equations for maths and reactions of chemistry and fo
      forces of physics. As above, so below. Money gone from there, so It gone to somewhere else. If money is diluted then It has not the same value.
      >Based on theories and assumptions like other sciences
      >Can be measured, like other sciences
      >Muh Pseudoscience
      You are fricking moron anon.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        But we know that the results of Economics are nowhere near as certain as the results of physics
        Contemporary models for the effects of mergers are incredibly sophisticated and complex
        But the actual empirical data on mergers is more like
        >eeeeeeh, we're not really sure what mergers actually do most of the time...
        And that's microeconomics which is much more precise and empirically grounded than macro

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Read a book on the philosophy of science, for Christ's sake. You are embarrassing yourself with your ignorance. My recommendations on this subject

          Philosophy of Science: The Critical Issues (2nd Edition)
          The Philosophy of Economics: An Anthology
          Preference, Value, Choice, and Welfare

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I'm gay

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            My problem here is empirical
            I can see the logic behind say the Williamson tradeoff, the Cournot model for mergers and most simulations make a lot of intuitive sense
            Nevertheless, the actual empirical data never really goes the way of the models no matter how scientifically rounded they are (I'd direct you towards the Acker and Nocke article from 2021, specifically the section on mergers to see the problems in action)
            >t. I work antitrust/competition law

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Economics is a huge discipline, and making broad claims about it's empirical forecasting ability based on your familiarity with some models or some papers in industrial organization is kind of not very convincing. The empirical evidence goes in the way of the models for like.... the huge majority of cases? and usually when it doesn't, it speaks to the need for a more refined or empirically respondent model. Which is good! This is how sciences progress.

            But what exactly is your point? There is noise and variation in the industrial organization literature qua M&A's. So What? I can't really rebut you directly at all, since I'm not *in* industrial organization or antitrust. I have read exactly 2 books about that subject and I never got the impression that our empirical tools were failing us. But I am not a specialist so I defer to your opinion on that.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Yeah it gets the job done and doesn't go into gay equations. You should read Fifty Major Economists next.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Why is that one a good follow-up?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Basic Economics doesn't really go into alternative economic theories

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          No shit, moron

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It's basic.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Picrel

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I've read both, and both are very good introductory books.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    No.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    not really. its too polemical and out of date

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    mises and rothbard are better. but none can teach economics as good as reinventing the field yourself without having read any books on it previously.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Better yet, learn about economics entirely through the negative. Only ever read critiques of systems by their rivals, even better if it is 4th hand truisms found in a YouTube comment section underneath a debate, just don't ever touch a primary source.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        your mind is the greatest primary source

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          This. It doesn't matter what the Marx wrote. Marx is dead and you are alive. YOU get to define what it is.

          End Necro-Cognitive Tyranny and be free.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Mises
      Being this low iq.
      https://israelihistoryamsterdam.com/the-israeli-history-of-amsterdam/

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        stop screaming like a monkey

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        pretty sure israelites don't claim him tbh. i mean he did flee europe in the 40s anyway but just being anti-bolshevist is basically being anti-semitic to israelites these days.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Goddamn I like this israelite. I love the way he thinks

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I love israelites!

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It is a good introduction. It is old, but it has been revised and updated a little. The latest is the 5th edition. The book is explicitly designed for people who are not familiar with the basic principles and ideas associated with economics. Sowell makes use of easy to understand language and leaves out most of the citations. You can find the citations on his website if you are interested. Sowell also wrote a book called Applied Economics which is a follow up.

    I think Sowell's greatest strength as a writer is that he doesn't get carried away by his own erudition. He seems to have a sincere desire to communicate his ideas in simple terms.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Uncle Tom paid off by her Royal Majesty to promote free trade

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Shut up clown

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      shut up congoid

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      so true!

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Have the Cuban frog men been stalking you lately?

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    see you know it's trustworthy because it's titled "basic economics" and has a cover deliberately chosen to resemble an actual textbook. totally transparent and honest

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >it's le bad because uhh... because it has a simple title and cover

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It is good and easy reading.
    Read at once.
    Before going into hardcore ~~*Economics*~~ you should read this.

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    They don't think markets be like it is but it do.

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Do you want to be an opinionated right-winger or to learn academic economics? If its the first, then yes. If its the latter, then no, start with undergrad textbooks (they're all slop, so choose whichever suits you), move on to grad textbooks (Romer, Varian, Mas-Colell, Tirole, Obstfeld and Rogoff, Stokey and Lucas, and some econometrics), and finally start reading papers and monographs.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      what you learn in introductory econ classes, especially micro, is basically what is in the basic economics. the only difference is that it doesn't have any math. someone trying to learn basic economics won't get much out of Mas-Colell

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I hate Mas-Colell so fricking much. Never recommend that shit to anyone. Just read Varian and Romer.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        me too, but it's what they teach, unfortunately. I also like Cowel, but I worry that it makes me a homosexual.

        what you learn in introductory econ classes, especially micro, is basically what is in the basic economics. the only difference is that it doesn't have any math. someone trying to learn basic economics won't get much out of Mas-Colell

        Mas-Colell is a grad-level reading, in my understanding. That's why I recommend undergrad textbooks first, and then Varian and Colell. Now, if one wants to just scratch the top and learn basic economics, the only reason I can think of that justifies not knowing the math of it is to be an opinionated righ-winger. In that case, as I said, read Basic Economics by Sowel, he's a good guy.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          academics are so annoying. are guys like Milton Friedman and Hayek "opinionated right wingers" too? Are you aware that these guys also have PHDs in economics? Is it possible that these folks might also 'understand the math behind it'? Now, imagine this - a book for the layman. The regular guy. Someone who wants to better understand the basic principles without having to earn a PHD and read multiple textbooks. Could such a book exist? Would it be useful to anyone?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            You're trying to talk with someone who has weird anger issues regarding the "right wing ... " Why even waste the energy?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            you are right

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            You're trying to talk with someone who has weird anger issues regarding the "right wing ... " Why even waste the energy?

            I never said it was a bad thing to be an opinionated right winger. I myself am one too. I was just pointing out that this book is good for that purpose, but not for the purpose of getting into academic economics. Both Hayek and Friedman have Nobel prizes for their work in economics, which was far from just philosophical. They both developed theoretical models, and the understanding of those models does not come from reading Basic Economics by Sowel. It will come from reading undergrad, then grad textbooks like the ones I mentioned above, which, if I'm not mistaken, are used in top-tier universities world-wide for the training of academic economists. On the other hand, both those writers mentioned have contributed to liberal political economy and their writings might well serve someone who wants to arm themselves with arguments. But they will not teach you hard economics. It depends on what you want to do, and I gave a conditional answer, as I though appropriate. Why are you so mad?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            in order: Yes, Yes, Yes, No, No.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/B7Ygere.jpg

      Is this book good?

      ok perfect I'll be adding it to my readlist

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >undergrad textbooks
      Econgay here. Samuelson and Nordhaus is probably the best intro textbook I've encountered thus far. Sowell is the better writer by far, but the explanations are much better than the other textbook slop

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Hey man I was looking into buying sowell’s book but I would rather follow a mini guide from you. Which textbooks in order would you advise me. I am medgay, passed some basic biomedical statistics, research methodologies etc but that’s it. I imagine you recommending me an undergrad book and then a grad level one. I guess after that I would know what to look for. Thanks in advance.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I am not that anon, but my advice is

        1. Fundamental Methods of Mathematical Economics - Alpha C Chaing

        2. Intermediate Microeconomics by Hal Varian

        3. Advanced Macroeconomics by David Romer

        4. Mastering Metrics by Angrist & Pischke

        5. Advanced Microeconomics by Jehle & Reny

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Well, economics is quite vast, but I will try to break it down the way most programmes do:
        Micro, Macro, Industrial Organization, Econometrics and Finance and International Macro.
        Let's start with Microeconomics: This annon

        https://i.imgur.com/2UWUBR2.jpg

        I am not that anon, but my advice is

        1. Fundamental Methods of Mathematical Economics - Alpha C Chaing

        2. Intermediate Microeconomics by Hal Varian

        3. Advanced Macroeconomics by David Romer

        4. Mastering Metrics by Angrist & Pischke

        5. Advanced Microeconomics by Jehle & Reny

        recommends
        1. Intermediate Microeconomics by Varian, and I have to say I agree, but I'd supplement with something more hand-holding. I really don't care what you get, just browse some university courses' recommended reading. I personally got through undergrad courses with
        2. Microeconomics by Krugman and Wells. The important thing to remember here is that undergrad micro is easy, so you don't have to worry too much about details. When we're done with these, and want to move to grad level reading on micro, you get these three books:
        3. Microeconomic Analysis by Varian
        4. Microeconomic Theory by Mas-Colell, Whinston and Green and
        5. Microeconomics: Principles and Analysis by Cowell. Unfortunately you have to read Varian's textbook if you're serious about it, and Colell's is a hellscape, but fortunately you have Cowell's to hold your hand along the way. This concludes your reading for Microeconomics.
        Now, let's move on to Macro. Here, you'll want to start with
        6. Brief Principles of Macroeconomics by Mankiew and
        7. Macroeconomics by Blanchard. I really really like Blanchard, but many people teach Mankiew, so get that one too. Moving to grad level macro, I can't say a bad word about
        8. Advanced Macroeconomics by Romer. Some people also recommend
        9. Economic Growth by Barro and Sala-i-Martin, but I'd stick mainly with Romer. If you're really interested in Macro, then it is essential that you get
        10. Recursive Methods in Economic Dynamics by Stokey and Lucas and
        11. Recursive Macroeconomic Theory by Ljunqqvist and Sargent. These books will only be useful to you if you want to get into macro-modelling, but I don't know if they are necessary for just getting a MSc. The Mathematics Appendix in Varian's Microeconomic Analysis can help you too.
        Now, Industrial Organization is an easy one:
        12. The Theory of Industrial Organization by Tirole. Printed in 1988, still widely used. Tirole is something of a shaman in economics, changing disciplines every once in a while and revolutionizing them along the way. I don't really have anything else to recommend as far as I.O. is concerned, but I will stress that it is a grad-level reading, and the undergrad micro readings are somewhat essential for getting started with it.
        Moving on to Econometrics. I got along fine with
        13. Introductory Econometrics by Wooldridge and
        14. Basic Econometrics by Gujarati. These will get you far enough. If you want something deeper, I got
        15. Applied Econometric Time Series by Enders and
        16. Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data by Wooldridge. I suppose a common reading in econometrics is
        17. Mostly harmless Econometrics by Angrist and Pischke.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I also really like Terrence Mills and his books, especially if you want to get into forecasting.
          Moving on to Finance and International Macro, it's not my specialty but I think it is essential to read
          18. Foundations of International Macroeconomics by Rogoff and Obstfeld. Looking through my library on finance, I have the following:
          19. Risk Management and Financial Institutions by Hull and
          20. Corporate Finance by Berk and DeMarzo. But I don't have any clue if that's what you should be reading.
          Finally, I want to say that some mathematical foundations are essential, especially when moving from undergrad to grad level. A. Chiang's books
          21. Fundamental Methods of Mathematical Economics and
          22. Elements of Dynamic Optimization are the go-to for me.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          thank you for the effort posting anon. Also as a physicist should i look into econophysics or is it a meme ?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I don't know, my fren, it was never brought up when I was studying econ. 'Fraid I can't answer that.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            no it is a meme. certainly outside the econ mainstream

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Thanks for the effort post mate. Best of luck in everything you do.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          thank you anon for the book recs. it seems mas cowell is where the real economics starts. I did economics in uk high school but it was completely boring ( it didn't involve any theorems / proofs and were completely essay based / non rigourous) so I went into pure maths. Mas Cowell looks to be where the actual maths is used and what economics was promised to be back when I was a teenager.

          if you have any economics books in a similar mathematical vein (such as definition, theorem, proof) I'd be extremely interested in them 😀

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            All the above-mentioned books concerning micro, macro, I.O. and econometrics are very mathematical.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I think I am more looking for formal / rigorous economics rather than just an application of mathematics. The grad level microeconomics and macroeconomics modelling books looks more like what I'm searching for

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I ain't reading all that lol

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            filtered

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It's a popsci book for econ.

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    economics is the only valid degree to get if you are not doing stem, pays more than some stem degrees as well

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    No, if you want to learn economics, you should get intermediate micro/intermediate macro textbooks.

    if you're dying to know about ecnomics without reading a god damned text books (the same way my fricking stupid undergrads refuse to read their god damn textbook) then here are some good "pop econ" books:

    New Ideas from Dead Economists
    Reinventing the Bazaar
    The Elusive Quest for Growth
    The Mystery of Capital
    The Worldly Philosophers
    Mastering Metrics

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Where do you teach?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        some third-rate university, it isn't worth talking about. I'm not a prof. just a ph.d student.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          why do a phd at a third rate university?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            eh. it was my life's ambition. this is the opportunity i was offered, and i grabbed it. I'd rather do my best to achieve my goals than rationalize myself out of trying just because the opportunity isn't as good as i wanted it to be.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          "it isn't worth talking about". now you got me curious, west coast area, cali?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            heartland

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            damn you really just gave out the name. are you not worried about the perception of posters on this site?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            lmfao. is there some hack institution called "heartland university" out there? I meant i'm in the heartland of the US. not a coastal chauvanist. a proper midwesterner.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Of course. A lot of them have an ingrained hatred of anything that smacks of blue collar labor and Christian values from what I've seen. A lot of posters claim that directionbrained thinking is bad considering almost all theorists post 1750 have engaged in its dichotomy and yet these people claim to be above it all whilst engaging in a symptom of TDS. Its truly astounding.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          people are too hard on themselves, be proud. you probably go to a top 50 uni which is not bad at all.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >my fricking stupid undergrads
      >phd student
      not your undergrads bud. Also check out those trips.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      what math do I need for textbooks

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Get A. Chiang's Fundamental methods of mathematical economics.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Get A. Chiang's Fundamental methods of mathematical economics.

        I actually second this anon, that is my preferred math econ textbook. But you really don't need much more than calculus 1 and linear algebra if you're in the undergraduate level, so don't fret about it.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I am unable to learn math above algebra for personal reasons, unfortunately.

  17. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I don't know I've not read it.

  18. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It's a collection of takes on various policy questions of macroeconomics based on case studies
    If you want the "theory", then no, it only has polemics against it, Sowell relies on you making the intuitive jump from his chosen case studies to him being right
    Still, in most cases, this really is what lay people think about when they think of "economics"
    Now, regulation theory has progressed quite a bit since the time Sowell really wrote the book and is more well rounded against such critiques though it's basically built on right wing assumptions no matter how much some people like to seethe against
    >muh public choice theory

  19. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Shut up clown

  20. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    /// There were no soldiers visible here, just traffic and crowds of shoppers and storekeepers, tourists and the schnorrers who hit them up for money /// Lisa was living it up like she didn't have a care in the world /// The discovery was a fluke /// The analysis needs to be more granular /// The ancient ivy cleaved to the ruined castle walls /// The speech touched on all the important issues but never really discussed them /// A ballot snafu in the election led to a recount /// The drug is very effective - the only snag is that it cannot be produced in large quantities /// People with devious intentions always manage to find loopholes in legislation /// The car gave a sudden judder, then stopped dead /// She might live to rue this impetuous decision /// For now, foreign companies should tread carefully and onshore user data when possible /// We had to trudge through deep snow to get to school /// The play just plodded along in the second act /// Wortman is listed as a denturist — a person who makes dentures — in the city of Dartmouth, near Halifax /// She'll be delivering the keynote address at the conference on Friday // He rummaged through the jumble of papers on his desk /// That is not much comfort to a motorist stuck in a snowdrift /// When they reached Trafalgar Square, the demonstrators were hemmed in by the police /// He is a philologist, specializing in American poetry /// Let's avoid that particular rabbit hole and consider a broader and more unsettling point ///All images were taken at 8000 frames per second, using schlieren photography /// The meticulous artist arranged the vibrant flowers in a perfectly set bouquet /// It's told in epistolary format (with emails messages, letters) as lawyers try and figure out what happened /// My older brother and his cronies all got computer science degrees as they were told this would be the "it" job of the future /// Under a new administration, the government has changed tack /// She viewed her students as blank slates, just waiting to be filled with knowledge /// The top of the wooden chest was inlaid with ivory /// When the economy hit the skids, trailers offered an alternative form of cheap, year-round housing /// She is a deadpan comedian of the driest vintage, and her face remained stolid /// Nor, given the premises of the white paper, is it obvious why capture would even have to be attempted /// Much of the privately owned cemetery is completely overgrown with kudzu or is returning to forest /// Although these reviews are extensive, they do not broach many of the fundamental questions of sleep research /// Her superb songwriting chops are on display in this album /// They arrogate to themselves the power to punish people /// Her heart sank at the thought of moving so far away /// For a long time, linguistic anthropologists have argued against equating a population that shares a linguistic code with the status of an ethnic unit ///

  21. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    NTA, I really appreciate the econgays chiming in with their textbook recommendations, but more back to the original topic, what other Econ books are there that are more layman-oriented, but pass muster?
    I don't need truly academic levels of depth, just enough to have a decent understanding of what makes the economic engine run. For context, I run a business that gets affected a lot by global macroeconomic conditions, so at the very least I want to understand enough not to make bad decisions.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      krugman's textbook on international economics is the gold standard i think for undergrads. but learning econ is not directly going to be useful though. just keeping up w/ the news, knowing about what the laws/regulations are, is going to be way more important than knowing econ theory.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *