it has been almost a decade where ssd are in the ~1-2tb range. what gives are they deliberately sandbagging progress??

it has been almost a decade where ssd are in the ~1-2tb range
what gives are they deliberately sandbagging progress??

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I don't know

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    They ditched 2.5" for the nvme m.2 form factors.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      they didn't ditch 2.5", it's just that 2.5" drives are now considered the big enterprise size

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        They ditched 2.5" for the nvme m.2 form factors.

        and if you're wondering, no, they aren't sata, or even sas, they're nvme

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          yes so why we can't have this connector on normal motherboards?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            you can, you might even already have one, and if not, you can get adapters for it

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Because dear god boards get made for anyone but the most normie consumer.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          They are SATA as well.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        NVMe stands for Never Vacuum My Elephant according to my AI

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I fricking hate how hot nvme ssds get in rooms with hot ambient temps, my nvme ssd health is already 98% health after less than a year of use because it is constantly over 60c.(my 2.5" is still at 100% health after years of use)
      most of the population do not need anything faster than your standard 2.5" ssd.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        The heath percentage has nothing to do with temperature, it's only tracks NAND wear from writes
        >my 2.5" is still at 100% health after years of use
        I have a kingston that claims it's 100% but only because crystaldiskinfo isn't reading the correct smart attribute, it's actually 86% after owning it 8 years

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Pretty sub par, but still for the performance it isn't as bad as I thought it was going to be back then. I am sure you baby'd it, though.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            I didn't baby it at all
            I always ran it damn near full

            Don't see any reason to coddle SSDs becuase if it was gonna die, it's gonna die, no amount of coddling is going to prevent it

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Over 60c? without constantly using it? get a proper cooler heatsink it's dirt cheap. Mine are always below 40. Don't take S.M.A.R.T too seriously as said, the most important thing is to keep them powered up.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        NAND works best at high temperatures. They retain their charge for longer the higher temperature is. What that means is that they will age slower in warm conditions.
        DRAM also doesn't mind that.
        What doesn't like high temperature is the controller, which is just a few ARM cores. They usually start to throttle around 80*C.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >NAND works best at high temperatures. They retain their charge for longer the higher temperature is.
          NAND works FASTER at high temperatures. This is good for their performance, but they retain their charge for longer the LOWER the temperature is.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            what the frick does retaining a charge powered off have to do with lifespan
            what he said is 100% correct, higher temperatures result in higher nand endurance

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >my nvme ssd health is already 98% health after less than a year of use because it is constantly over 60c.
        correlation isn't causation you dickhead
        nand cells literally live longer at higher temps

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >nand cells literally live longer at higher temps
          It throttles you dumb frick

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        It's truly moronic. It's barely faster than SATA SSDs too, all that for a lot of heat.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          There is no stopping morons and "new thing".

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    You can easily buy 4,8 or even 16tb ssds.
    1 and 2tb are dirt cheap nowadays...

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      except once you go to 4tb it is no longer cheap at all

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        true, most of them over 4 are 4-15 cents per gig, HDD's are still the best option for price per capacity ratio

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    what do you mean? I have one

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >what gives are they deliberately sandbagging progress??
    no

    speed increased massively
    earlier PCIe ssds were incredible expensive and not much faster compared to todays M2
    and price dropped too

    >almost a decade
    that's because ssd price is largely dictated by transistor size and effective production
    transistor size did not went down much in the past 10years

    yield got better (thus price decrease)
    and packing got better (difference here is mostly visible for CPUs / GPUs)

    other progress for CPUs / GPUs is mostly achieved by just making a physically bigger die and slap more transistors on it (nvidias / apple M / threadripper / server dies are huge)
    the same just works very limited for SSDs

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    It's a combination of technological stagnation and cartel pricing.

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Not really. It's just that with the money that could get you a 1TB SSD back then, now will get you 8TB.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      10 years ago i spend $140 for 120gb ssd (evo 840), year later it was 250gb (evo 850)

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        prices really have reduced drastically.
        Back in 2009 I've upgraded to an SSD for windows 7, was around 150€ for 60gb.
        Upgraded again in 2012, around 120€ for 128gb, in 2016 with 500gb for 120€ and recently to 2tb nvme for 120€.
        I think for my next upgrade in a few years I will buy 8tb nvme to go SSD only.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Not really, it's the same thing as with the normal compute nodes, nand is plateauing. 3d helped, but scaling is not infinite. We are reaching the limits of what possible with our materials.

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Yes. They're deliberately stalling.

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I have 3.7TiB NVMe's.

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    who the frick cares, why do you need a bigger disk? get a NAS, they store hundreds of terabytes or more

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >it has been almost a decade where ssd are in the ~1-2tb range
    there's literally SSDs up to 30TB, are you really this fricking stupid and poor?

  12. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I have a 4TB SSD, moron.
    Muh THEY

  13. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Same reason videocards have stagnated, the real money is in enterprise usecases now so the players all collude and sandbag consumer stuff so they can upsell the datacenter stuff.
    Only difference with ssds is there's more extant companies colluding.

  14. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    motherboard ata io is still commonly 500MBps
    >16 years later

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