Italo Calvino

Are his fiction worth reading or are they just postmodernslop?
What about his essays?

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  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    *his fiction works

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    He's not a postmodernist. Understand that a lot of the mechanics of his stories he worked out through putting together a collection of Italian folktales, akin to Grimm fairytales. Cosmicomics in particular is like a collection of folktales or etiologies using scientific subjects.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Didn't he steal a bunch of folktales and make a whole book of just that?

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Do you mean his formal collection of Italian folktales, "Italian Folktales"? It's not really theft, he's pretty clear it's a collection that's supposed to be for Italy what Grimm's collection was for Prussia.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I'm not saying it's a bad thing that he stole them for profit.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            He was asked by the government to collect and edit lesser known folktales as a matter of preservation and national interest.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Steal from where? You gotta know them first, and that knowledge isn't just something everybody has.
            >but they're folktales
            Yeah but still you need university-tier knowledge to know more than like 3

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            ESL moment

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            no argument midwit moment

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >you need university-tier knowledge to know more than like 3
            Imagine being this moronic.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            ok write a book about 100 folktales and make bank

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        You mean like everybody who writes a book of folktales?

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >steal a bunch of folktales
        >steal
        >folktales

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >He's not a postmodernist
      >describes a very postmodern thing in the rest of the post
      kys pseud.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >postmodernism is writing traditional stories with modern subjects
        Go back to school.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >he only wrote one book
          moron

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Why do brainlets insist on making moronic posts?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >He's not a postmodernist
      He is. You're thinking of maximalism.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        No, he's at most a modernist akin to Joyce, but anyone with a wide-ranging exposure to literature can see he's in the tradition of authors like Cervantes, de Bergerac, Swift, Rabelais, Sterne, etc.. Postmodernists in literature are writers like Burroughs, Pynchon, Ackers, Copeland, Delillo, Barthelme, writers using pastiche, cut-ups, with a strong and overt rejection of tradition both in content and in form, denying any distinction between high and low or beautiful and ugly, mostly pointing to a supposed pointlessness about everything. If On A Winter's Night... isn’t postmodern just because he plays with form, since the kind of form play he uses already has precedents in early modern literature. See his Six Memos For the Next Millennium for a rundown of all of the older literature that his work is informed by.

        >he only wrote one book
        moron

        You have no idea how postmodernism in literature is characterized.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          You have no idea idea what you are talking about.

  3. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    his two big works:
    -invisible cities
    and
    -if on a winter night
    are both amazing works, i have not read much more about him besides those two yet.
    for his essays i have no idea, but he did praise Gadda a whole bunch so he gets brownie points from me

  4. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Y'all should read Marcovaldo, by Calvino. It's 20 short vignettes (barely a 100 pages total) from the life of a working-class Don Quixote type character, who doesn't necessarily dream of castles and dragons, but rather getting away from his wife and Six children and sleeping on a park bench under the moonlight.

    It's always seemingly mundane stuff, that gets him hyped but they all end in hilariously miserable ways for him. The first story is him being very happy that he saw mushrooms growing in his neighborhood and he plots to have a grand meal with his family when they're fully grown, eventually when his rivals also start collecting the shrooms. They all have a grand meal, and all get sick because of the mushrooms and he has to end up sharing a hospital bed with his rival.

    Geniuenly funny stories. 10/10

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      tha sounds pretty good tbf

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Thanks for the rec, sounds comfy

  5. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Are his fiction worth reading
    I still think about them near daily. Slop or not. It's interesting stuff.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      which ones are your favourites ?
      i'm thinking of reading the 'our ancestors' trilogy

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        our ancestors 🙂

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I've only read his Complete Cosmicomics. The first third especially is just like nothing I've read before. Made me a fan, even though I struggled to get through the last third.

        It was like listening to the pub bore about his tall tales, except he's god, and has been telling the truth the whole time.

  6. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Invisible Cities is the best book I've read so far, hands down.
    Haven't read anything else of his though

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      It was the first non-required book I read in a library, those were the days

      his two big works:
      -invisible cities
      and
      -if on a winter night
      are both amazing works, i have not read much more about him besides those two yet.
      for his essays i have no idea, but he did praise Gadda a whole bunch so he gets brownie points from me

      Yeah add to that the Castle of Crossed Destinies (especially the 2nd part, Tavern of Crossed Destinies) and you got virtually all his greatest hits... okay maybe "Under the Jaguar Sun" is also worth it (the short story itself, not the compilation of which it is part)

      I could never stomach his science fiction

  7. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    his scifi tales are short and funny

  8. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Hello SAAR

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >latinx moment

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >pajeet moment

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >replying to posts from 12+ hours ago
          go back to picking fruit jose

  9. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    his only truly postmodern book is invisible cities. his other works are mostly magical realism/surrealism/satirical stories. it's worth it tho.

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