>Keats died of tuberculosis at only 25, and some of his friends, including Percy Bysshe Shelley, claimed that his death had been hastened by the st...

>Keats died of tuberculosis at only 25, and some of his friends, including Percy Bysshe Shelley, claimed that his death had been hastened by the stress caused by negative reviews of his work in The Quarterly Review. Byron found that hilarious. He even made fun of him, posthumously, in his famous epic poem Don Juan:

>John Keats, who was killed off by one critique,
>Just as he really promised something great,
>If not intelligible, —without Greek
>Contrived to talk about the Gods of late,
>Much as they might have been supposed to speak.
>Poor fellow! His was an untoward fate: —
>‘Tis strange the mind, that very fiery particle,
>Should let itself be snuffed out by an Article.
The frick was his problem?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >how is cyber

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    OHNONONO KEATSSISTERS HAVE WE BEEN BTFOD BY BYRONCHADS AGAIN???

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      That's brutal, here's how Byron commented in the same situation (reading a positive review of Keats):
      >Of the praises of that little dirty blackguard KEATES in the Edinburgh—I shall observe as Johnson did when Sheridan the actor got a pension. “What has he got a pension? then it is time that I should give up mine.”—Nobody could be prouder of the praises of the Edinburgh than I was—or more alive to their censure—as I showed in EB and SR—at present all the men they have ever praised are degraded by that insane article.—Why don’t they review & praise “Solomon’s Guide to Health” it is better sense—and as much poetry as Johnny Keates.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Keats is the greater man. He saw real tragedy in his short life and in only five years of writing changed the landscape of poetry forever. He was a deep thinker and a gentle soul. Too based for this world.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        i agree

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >short life
        heh

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        This, while Byron wrote some neat stuff I wouldn't hesitate to let his whole oeuvre perish in the flames to save the ode to a nightingale alone.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Funny how Keats was an infinitely better poet than Byron. Second only to Shakespeare and even then it's close. Only lived to 25, no less. Get fricked.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      It was natural that the 19th century equivalent of a frick boi would hate a depressive weirdo like Keats

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Second only to Shakespeare and even then it's close.
      lol

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        if you read keats' odes and his other late work you'll realise this isn't a laughable opinion at all

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Dude, Shakespeare isn't even superior to Spenser or Sidney.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Great insight. Precisely why Spenser and Sidney are read so much these days, and the Earl of Oxford all but ignored.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Literature isn't a popularity contest dipshit

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Temporarily, it is. And I personally love Spenser.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            *Temporally, rather

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Literally insane. I could at least understood Spenser, but Sydney is just ridiculous.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          t. Bardolator

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Keats died in 1821
    >Shelley died in 1822
    >Byron died in 1824
    And in one fell swoop died the entire movement of second generation English Romantic poetry. I blame English culture for suffocating their geniuses.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      it's annoying that coleridge the underachiever and wordsworth the hack were the two that avoided early deaths

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Frick you

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          tbf wordsworth did some good stuff, it's just mostly shit

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Kek. Tbf (you) need to read more before dropping incredibly stupid, ill informed opinions. Not only did Wordsworth (and Blake) break the new ground, but the two were by far the best English poets of the late 18th, early 19th century, and it isn't even close. What protects Keats? Fake nostalgia, and the fact that his entire poetic corpus and surviving letters can be read in a single day. That said, the odes really are great-- all five of them.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            tbf blake, wordsworth, and keats are all equally good, but blake and keats more-so

            https://i.imgur.com/XAX0SbW.jpeg

            I like them both.

            >.jpg
            this you yeah ? you look like a sheep, mate

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            The problem with Keats is a complete lack of spontaneity, which doesn't at all apply to Shakespeare, Wordsworth, or even Byron. His best poems are like highly wrought israeliteels-- lovely, yes, but entirely self-contained. Was he endeavouring to break out of himself (as it were) before his untimely death? Yes, but unfortunately wasn't granted time enough for this to happen even to his own satisfaction. I truly get general 'love for Keats' -- his case really *is* tragic. Part of the tragedy being that even Shelley's a more valuable poet, in my opinion. Not to suggest that Keats has no value at all, because he clearly does, etc.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            So what do you think of Coleridge?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I love Coleridge, but then again, not alot of poetry. Biographia Literaria and The Friend essays prompt comparisons with the great essayists of that time-- Lamb, DeQuincey, among a few others, and a little later, Hazlitt. This assessment:

            it's annoying that coleridge the underachiever and wordsworth the hack were the two that avoided early deaths

            so far as Coleridge is concerned is merely Hazlitt's envy come down through the ages. Though a brilliant stylist, Hazlitt's not nearly as rich substantively, nor near so helpful to the reader, as Coleridge remains.
            Some of his poetry is of course brilliant.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            wasn't it de Quincey who fricking roasted him for being a pseud when he got into religion and philosophy in old age

            https://i.imgur.com/LTYrJVT.jpeg

            >The kind of man that Keats was gets ever more horrible to me. Force of hunger for pleasure of every kind, and want of all other force—that is a combination!
            >Shelley is a poor shrieking creature who has said or sung nothing worth a serious man being at the trouble of remembering.

            based Carlyle poster

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      The sadness of the fact only adds to the romance which is ultimately what they would have wanted

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Keats was a lovely person. Donne is apparently a cheap fame-hound.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    keats had a true and genuine love in fanny brawne, who influenced his poetry for the better
    byron had lots of sex with italian princesses and various illegitimate children
    the latter was probably more fun, but the former more beautiful

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Shelley said of Keats, after inviting him to stay with him in Pisa after the latter fell ill: "I am aware indeed that I am nourishing a rival who will far surpass me and this is an additional motive & will be an added pleasure."
    Bros, what could have been...

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    A fever killed Byron, but I won't deny that he left us like a chad, he was fighting those filthy ottomans.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I like them both.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >The kind of man that Keats was gets ever more horrible to me. Force of hunger for pleasure of every kind, and want of all other force—that is a combination!
    >Shelley is a poor shrieking creature who has said or sung nothing worth a serious man being at the trouble of remembering.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >a poor shrieking creature
      Yeah, ok Thom ass

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Carlyle’s opinions of his century’s poets/fiction writers is always funny lmao.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Kek. As are his opinions of most of his contemporaries as well as most of the historical personages he deals with. Strange thing is, when he likes someone (for instance, Mirabeau) he just can't stop sucking their dick. Odd duck.

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    he was a psycho who would do anything to feel powerful, hence his running off to some piddling war like it was the most important thing in the world

    compare to today's Palestrannies

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