Let's say you had the opportunity to implement a new education system in your country (and your country had very poor educational rates), what bo...

Let's say you had the opportunity to implement a new education system in your country (and your country had very poor educational rates), what books and models would you study to get an initial sense of which ideas could be successfully replicated in your country?

In summary: the best books about education/the best books about the best education systems.

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  1. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    >no US flag
    lol

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      further
      > canadian flag
      haaaaaa

  2. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    I made a YouTube video discussing this book (don't watch it. It was before I learned to write a script and edit)

    ?si=FmS05DcAztvE58gC

    I'm a libertarian but even I'm tempted by the Finnish model. All they had to do was pass a law saying that to be a teacher you need to graduate in the top 30% of your class in the top 3 schools and be mentored by 3 teachers. And lo and behold they are now top in the world. I know the author said it's not the unions. But it definitely is the unions, because the unions in America would never allow that to happen. It's crazy and infuriating to read that in America you don't need to be a math major to be a math teacher. You don't even need to be a math minor. You can score a 21 in the ACT and be a teacher, and while the average is 21.5 that means you can be dumber that the average American and become a teacher.

    The other great observation the author made was that everywhere she went, every body resisted and pushed against any change. When in Minnesota they tried to have higher standards for teachers, even though there's a teacher surplus of like 100%, they fought it. Some parents even argued that dumb teachers are better because they'll be able to sympathize with the dumb students.

    If the US abolished teacher's unions, and the parents became the customers (as opposed to the school board) we'd shoot to the top

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      >If the US abolished teacher's unions, and the parents became the customers
      And teacher pay rose more than 50%. No on is going to graduate in the top 30% in a top 3 school and then go work for 60k

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      >I'm a libertarian but even I'm tempted by the Finnish model.

      I have found out just a few minutes before I saw your post a book that deals with this very topic:

      https://www.amazon.com/Nordic-Education-Model-Neo-Liberal-Implications/dp/940077124X/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=

      >don't watch it. It was before I learned to write a script and edit
      Don't worry. We all need to start somewhere. I myself am trying to learn video editing so I know that some things might seem simple for people that are used to it, but are quite hard for a begginer.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      >All they had to do was pass a law saying that to be a teacher you need to graduate in the top 30% of your class in the top 3 schools and be mentored by 3 teachers.

      Brainlet here. I have a doubt.

      That sees very good, but how would you solve the problem of a lack of teachers in big, continental countries, like the US, Brazil, India, etc? Would you be able to supply the demand for teachers if you allow only the 30% best to become teachers?

      And what about all the rest of the 70% of people that graduate in english, history, geography, math, physics, biology...since there's limited jobs in research and in companies, what would they end up doing to earn a living?

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        Something else

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      The issue with America is already dealing with violent apes who can no longer be disciplined by bleeding hearts, and importing more violent morons. You can't ahead in that market.

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        Pretty sure Jethro from Alabama has nothing to do with that, but Europoids cheer it on like some kind of hollow victory.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      The US right now has a unique problem. We talk about teachers being underpaid, but the majority of them graduate in the bottom third, and most of the ones who do have good private sector employment prospects leave.

      The problem is that this creates a cycle of low talent retention leading to worse outcomes leading to the public being more averse to wanting to compensate them. This in turn leads to a situation where to keep the schools full at all you offer job security in leiu of money, so it gets very hard to change anything,

  3. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Rousseau's model of education obviously. No books until the age of 12. At the age of 12, let them discover him by himself. Then have him choose a trade wich he should finish around 18. At this point he can have his first history lesson, his first theology lesson (if he is taught about the God's he might become technically an anthropomorphist or later become an atheist altogether and we want to avoid that) and his first sex Ed lesson (unless he lives in a shitty neighborhood, than there's no reason not to tell him about the birds and bees at the age of 9, if you make a secrecy around it he won't stay a virgin until he's 20 but if it's physically manageable to keep him in ignorance until his mid-teens it would be ideal). And many other details I won't explain further these are just the ones that fell from the top of my head. Not sending him to school of course because school sucks lol.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Then have him choose a trade wich he should finish around 18.

      Great, Then we should have a bunch of 18 yr old astronauts, cowboys, professional wrestlers.

  4. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    I'd separate all the brown kids from the human kids

  5. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    freedom to learn by carl rogers. basically along those same lines of non-directed therapy. the teacher/educator provides the student with resources (books, the teacher's own expertise, other experts, films, tapes, field-trips and so on), doesn't present any curriculum, doesn't direct the student as to what they need to learn, doesn't grade or assess the student, makes the student aware that they're available as a resource and a gateway to other potential resources and just sits back and follows the student's lead. this creates children who are self-directing, and who are inherently interested in what they learn

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      You mean ChatGPT?

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      Hell yeah, brother

  6. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    I think school shouldn't be mandatory for everyone. There's no reason to waste qualified teachers at ghetto schools where the kids don't want to learn anyways.

  7. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Plato’s Republic critiqued by Spinoza’s Ethics critiqued by Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit. Or a remix.

  8. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    I show them Hollywood movies, show them how the same actor can appear in multiple movies as mutiple people, and even cannonically die then come back in the next blockbuster. Then I tell them that if they die they'll come back, like in a Hollywood movie, and that I have magic powers to make them invincible to bullets.

    Then I give them an AK47 and send them over the border to rape and pillage my enemies. Younger kids are better at this because they lack life experience and will feel nothing at killing a man.

  9. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Ban everything but STEM and Vocational Training and ban women from attending school

  10. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    This is probably the best book on education ever

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      Care to explain?

  11. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    The best books I've read on education are (Atheists be warned ahead of time, these are all Christian authors):

    Some Thoughts Concerning Education by John Locke
    On Education by John Milton
    Belles Lettres and on Taste and Criticism by Hugh Blair

    And while it isn't a treatise directly on education, The Republic by Plato talks a lot about the education of youth and citizens, particularly in books 3-5 iirc.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      >unironically citing Plato as a good influence on children

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      The Republic could very well be renamed The Education of Plato. It’s meant to be returned to often enough for it to be called an educative work through and through.

  12. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    If I could start a new education system in my country it would be radically departed from the systematized, Prussian-model derived education in most modern first world countries. I doubt books exist that accurately describe a model that seeks to achieve what I'd hope to achieve, since real experimentation outside the paradigm doesn't exist in modernity.

  13. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    I was too obsessed with girls to focus on school work. Are there books about that?

  14. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Everyone gets to read Three Books
    Robinson Crusoe
    Plutarch's Morals
    Book of Job

  15. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    There isn't much to change, most schools are just daycare so wagies can work and thats all they are really intended to be

  16. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    As a burger I would do unspeakable things for an system wherein I could just take a test to get placed fairly into college and then get a career, books about the contemporary Japanese or Chinese education system would explain more. From what I gather the former is starting to focus more on interviews for college admission which I reflexively see as a vector for diversity hiring and petty HR screening, but it might have noble motivations.

    The underlying contradiction is that everyone understands schooling to be a hybrid daycare for wagie children/future wagie training course for better performing children, but it justifies itself with platitudes relating to "citizenship" and "values". Inspiration from Wilhelm von Humboldt and the Prussian model of education are blamed for causing conformity and strictness in America, but this is probably a mistake when Britain and France had similar compulsive schooling and Humboldt specifically stressed individual autonomy. Ironically, it would be more accurate to blame them for Weltbürgertum (cosmopolitanism) becoming a tenant of education. Of course Aristotle advocated for a kind of liberal arts education over a purely vocational one as well, so it's not anything completely new.

    Regardless of the origin, when you take the attempt at moral teaching by low-quality women who spent their 20's clubbing, and combine it with teachers unions/book publishers/universities debt trapping students in typical boomer-Kronid fashion, of course the result is something so ineffective that practically any education system or (even the absence of one) would be preferable. You would need to separate each role of education (moral teaching, vocational training, research) to delineated pathways, but most important of all, remove status-seeking midwits (mostly women) and profit motive from it.

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