Man-Made Whirlpool Energy

Theoretically, if we open 4 channel paths to a large landmass, we create a huge vortex in the center of the landmass. Can we energize the perpetual motion of this vortex?

I drew it in the picture, I think it's understandable. How much would it cost to create such a water canal path?

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  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    No, because the damage to nature would be really great. I don't think it's ethical at all.

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Why would it whirlpool?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      This is because multiple currents in opposite directions collide to form a vortex in the center of the landmass.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Okay. I will think about this. Seems ineffective compared to just putting machine in regular waters due to channels limiting force, but still interesting so I will think.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Wouldn't the OP's project contribute to carbon emissions? With global warming at such a peak, we need to avoid such projects that can harm the environment. Also, as I said again above, it is unethical to use someone else's landmass for such environmentally damaging projects, instead we should focus on projects that are both healthier for the environment and cost-effective.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Lol. Doing anything (un)sustainable in whatever way requires some kind of mining, production, transportation, storage, burning and disturbing ecosystems. Calculations of environmental costs are subjective, disputed and changing all the time.

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Jonathan Trismegistus

    It’s possible using a fountain and burneil’s principle via; if the pressure of the body of water powering the stream via gravitational force is constant. Lunar tidal force could even be used for even better effects via tidal force dissipation. This is the only way it’ll whirlpool, but to me perpetual motion sucks; for creating any resourceful thermodynamic sources of energy.

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Perpetual motion machines are not possible. Period. End of discussion.
    Every fricking 12 year old thinks they can discover the secret to building a PMM. You can't. Smarter people than you have tried and failed EVERY time because you cannot outsmart thermodynamics.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      the whirlpool pulls energy from the earths rotation dumbass

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      The water cycle is perpetual enough compared to the scale of human lives, but if you prefer continuous motion machine, that would technically be more correct.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      jesus christ this is like the lowest iq pseudointellectual comment i have ever read
      >um actually you CANNOT smart thermodynamics
      he clearly meant that the energy was effectively perpetual since whatever forces form the whirlpool are near-limitless

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Now you're starting to understand the meaning and power behind the swastika and how that related to prehistoric Atlantis

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    bruh, isn't this just a hydro electric dam?
    Think about it carefully, for the water to flow in your drawing, the region where all 4 streams meet have to be at a lower altitude than the body of water it comes from, otherwise the water just settles. How is this different from a dam?
    They also use altitude and water flow to produce energy, your design is just stupid big.
    Also, no such thing as perpetual motion; suck enough energy out of the system and even this big boy vortex will stop. There's a limit to how much energy it can produce, because there's a limited amount of water, even if this is continent sized.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      The idea I want to present here is to have a hydroelectric power plant at the center and to distribute the generated energy evenly across the four corners of the landmass.

      As you say, there should be walls surrounding the landmass like mountains so that the water can flow downwards so that a whirlpool is created, otherwise, as you say, the water will not flow as idealized.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        So build a small scale model and see how much energy you can extract, then use math to scale it up to see if it could actually be profitable.

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Since this thread is filled with brainlets.

    In terms of hydroelectric power, we have the euler equation to work with. What kind of forces do you want or can translate to energy? Height difference, which would equal 0 in this case (which is pretty bad, since height is a major factor g*(h2-h1))
    Speed, which would depend on the current and translate to an autonomous rotational movement (drill).

    Now what your desired turbine can do is translate the incoming drill to mechanical energy and then to electrical energy.

    By removing the factor of height we have effectively only the speed of the current to work with, which equals 1/2 delta c^1.

    Now you need a turbine which is able to translate the said energy to mechanical energy. There are 4 types to work with:
    -Kaplan, Ossberger, Pelton, Francis
    Pelton only works efficiently for big height differences, same goes for francis. Kaplan needs at least a small height difference to work with... So only Ossberger is left. Which is basicly the modern version of a historically very inefficient Watermill.

    Mass Current * your speed energy = mechanical power -> now you have some losses due to the efficient factor ( dissipation etc). -> your generator has now that much to work with. Your power output is minimal and all in all rather ineffective way to generate energy.

    Maybe for designated colonies and only gpr that, but powering anythign beyond a small village? never.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      nice namedropping and textbook regurgitation

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Okay then Try to disprove said answer. Do the calculation yourself. Where is the energy supposed to come from? What is your scientific background beside shitposting on here.

        First law of thermodynamics:
        stationary, adiabatic
        0 = P + m ((h1 - h2) + 1/2(c1^2-c2^2)+g(z1-z2)).

        Your generated power is directly proportional to Water Mass/ seconds and speed, since height = 0 and enthalpy doesn't change

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Here for better understanding. The power output is also in the picture. As I said height is a major factor when it comes to efficient hydroelectric power. Just plain water is not really dense in energy, compared to wster vapor. That's why steam engines are a thing. Steam is much more energy dense. There are 2 very big hydroelectric plants on this planet One is Itaipu and the other is the 3 gorges Dam. Both have these 2 factors. Height + a shit ton of water mass to work with

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    So you're actually thinking of a landmass with a huge hydroelectric power plant, but you can live around it. You'd need a very large bucket-wheel excavator for that. Also, it's funny to get that kind of energy from plain water, the river has to flow downstream so that it gains speed.

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