Check out this ridiculous marriage advice from 1933 October 1933 issue of Reading Eagle reports on a survey that gathered information on happiness in marriage. And it's ridiculous.

Want to live happily ever after? Researchers thought they had the secret almost a hundred years ago. We stumbled upon this October 1933 issue of Reading Eagle newspaper, reporting on a University of Chicago survey that gathered information on happiness in marriage. Among the findings:

  • The longer the courtship, the better the chances for lifelong married happiness
  • …but only within the period of one year (this was 1933, after all!)
  • But don’t jump the gun, either. For every three months less than a year, the chances of married happiness diminish by 30 percent.
  • Father knows best when it comes to advice on a prospective partner—those who take Dad’s advice will be happier than if they ignore it.
  • Ignore Mom—things don’t work out so well when taking her advice, according to the article. (No word on whether those about to be married should think about what they themselves want).

Google has an archive of the newspaper here.

If you accidentally research yourself even earlier back in time, as I did, you may find this list of marriage advice from a suffragette, written in 1911:

What do you think—are there nuggets of wisdom in these ancient pieces of marriage advice, or is it seriously outdated?

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4 thoughts on “<span class="entry-title-primary">Check out this ridiculous marriage advice from 1933</span> <span class="entry-subtitle">October 1933 issue of Reading Eagle reports on a survey that gathered information on happiness in marriage. And it's ridiculous.</span>”

  1. Its a lot better than some of the old newspaper articles I have read on marriage but its so derogatory to women. We deserve to be treated as queens not as property.

  2. Taking time to court definitely strengthens committment to eachother. Similar to how not living together before the marriage strengthens the post-marital bond.
    But that's really it. I'd listen to my own heart before asking my parents what they think. And as far as mom vs. dad goes, mom would give the better advice. If it were up to my dad, he'd have us (my sister and sis too) all married right out of high school!

  3. My grandmother was born in 1933. She got married at 18. I can't believe this is the type of articles my great-grandmother would read in the newspaper. Crazy how times change !

  4. I kind of like the fact that they mention asking parents for advice at all, even if they do recommend ignoring Mom. Today it seems like most people say "screw my family, I do what I want."

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