Most of what Europeans conquered and colonized were backwards ooga-booga tier cultures, but the loss of the Inca Empire was genuinely tragic.

Most of what Europeans conquered and colonized were backwards ooga-booga tier cultures, but the loss of the Inca Empire was genuinely tragic.

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  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The child sacrificing must end.
    Now we must sacrifice women because they be witches!

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >execute suspected criminals
      >"woah this is literally the same as killing 8000 children to ask huacaxotoquetzolotl for a good harvest"

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        What makes all of Mesoamerica more ooga booga then the Inca/Andes

        I don't know about Andean sacrifices, but most Mesoamerican sacrifices were captured enemy soldiers, and there were specific rules and processes around who could be sacrificed and when, even slaves had rights around this.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Witch burning was hardly systemic, and most of it was calvinist/huguenot dogs in germany and france.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I mean the first Spaniards didn't care about it, though they did arrive expecting such practices because of what they found elsewhere.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        In fact, no conquistador ever personally witnessed an Inca sacrifice, basically all details are from later sources.

        Early documents of the conquest don't even mention sacrifices, or if they do, the only precisions are when discussing north coastal natives (former Chimu empire territory), whose priests were largely independent from the imperial church. Even the conquistadors themselves mention coastal sacrifices only to juxtapose how more civilized the mountain people were over them (interestingly without attributing human sacrificing practices to mountain people in these comparisons)

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >Early documents of the conquest don't even mention sacrifices, or if they do
          For example the Samano-Xerez letter, an early document about the discovery of "Peru" (actually the shores of modern-day Colombia and Ecuador, though it does describe a place in modern Peru just next to Ecuador but doesn't provide more than the name).

          It has descriptions of the natives along the Colombian coast. Still, perhaps, more importantly, the seemingly more advanced natives from coastal Ecuador, who were vassals of the Inca Empire, called the Guancavilca, rebelled during the Inca civil war and were subdued again by Atahualpa.

          This does not mean that human sacrifices weren't performed in coastal Ecuador btw. For example, decades later, Cieza describes that sacrifices were sometimes performed on a sacred small island adjacent to Puna Island (the largest island off the coast of Ecuador, unrelated but the aforementioned rebellion persisted in Puna for a little longer). However, as can be seen, concerns about human sacrifices weren't the main driving factor of the conquest (duh), but rather the search for precious metals.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >the largest island off the coast of Ecuador, unrelated but the aforementioned rebellion persisted in Puna for a little longer
            Pic shows the rough extension of the Guancavilca league and this video briefly covers its rebellion along with other events that happened during the civil war.

            During the initial phase of Pizarro's 3rd (and last) voyage to Peru, the island of Puna seemed independent when he first visited it, but was subdued by a governor from Quito sent by Atahualpa when he arrived in Tumbes.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >In fact, no conquistador ever personally witnessed an Inca sacrifice, basically all details are from later sources.
          And because of this, many aspects of Inca religion and its human sacrifices vary widely from author to author. Some claim they were regular and scheduled, while others do not. Some say the sacrifices were very large, while others argue the contrary. Some even claim that the Incas did not engage in any kind of human sacrificing practices, as Inca Garcilaso de la Vega and the Anonymous Jesuit claim.

          Pic related is for example what Cieza thought about the matter, he was one of the most well-versed in Inca history and quite neutral, translation:
          "Some people publish – and perhaps some writer, in a hurry to write, will soon publish – that they killed on their feast days, a thousand or two thousand children and an even greater number of Indians; and these and other things are testimony that we Spaniards accuse these Indians, wanting with these things to cover up our own greater errors and justify the mistreatment we have given them. I am not saying that they did not sacrifice and did not kill men and children in such sacrifices; but it was not as it is said, not by far. They sacrificed animals and livestock, but human creatures much less than I thought, and certainly, as I will tell in its place."

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    They were at the mercy of forces they didn't fully understand - namely, disease

  3. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    the Inca were just as ooga-booga as any settled African civilization, they just stacked rocks all pretty-like

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Why

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      The Inca state and its workings was objectively more impressive than tiny straw hut city-states whose greatest accomplishments was selling slaves to euros and arabs, and no, muh iron doesn't change that at all

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Do not mess with muh straw huts

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      The conquistadors thought Incan cities were more civilized than European ones.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        If they were really that great and superior to European civilizations, then why didn't the Europeans carry on the same practices? It was probably hyperbole.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Not that anon but I remember an account mentioning the people did it so because the punishes for littering were severe, and in many places the irrigation canals that supplied water to the houses ran alongside the streets or between them, pic related is an original Inca street from a small town

          Basically all Inca punishments were severe btw, even as a soldier your hand was cut off if you stole a single ear of corn, these are a few of the laws enacted during Pachacuti reign, there are many more known but more are unknown:

          He ordered and commanded
          - The war captain on campaign should not leave any province behind with the danger of rebelling and as he advances, he should establish posts along the entire route, staffed by people from the region.
          - These posts should be supplied with food from the same province, with lands planted specifically for this purpose.
          - In each of these provinces, a principal lord should be appointed to provision the post, which should be visited every ten days, and if this lord fails to provision the post, he should be hanged on the spot; and the curaca (local chief) of that province should lose his lordship.
          - The captain who conquers provinces should place the insignias of those provinces in his house and on his belongings, and he may adopt the surname and title from it if he wishes.
          - Each war captain should ensure that each province constructs a tambo (rest house) along the royal road, and that they place mamaconas (priestesses) with chicha (corn beer) and food for those from Cuzco who pass by.
          - Each curaca of a province should ensure that they know if a noble lord from Cuzco leaves Cuzco and travels along their land’s route, so they can come out to the tambos to greet him with people prepared to carry the lord’s loads from tambo to tambo.
          - If these carriers pass beyond a tambo, the curaca of that province should receive ten blows with a stone on his back with all the strength of a man.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            cont (these are about war campaigns, there are others about other subjects)
            - If this curaca repeats the offense, he should be deemed incorrigible and hanged in his tambo.
            - The captain leading the war party should command that every forty leagues from Cuzco to their destination, the tambos be supplied with all kinds of food: corn, chuño (dried potatoes), potatoes, quinoa, chili pepper, salt, and dried meat; fish and livestock.
            - This food is for the war party and they should take what they need until the next tambo, and the distance between tambos of forty leagues should be called Xuco Guamán, which means "falcon's flight."
            - Each year, the curacas of the provinces should fill these tambos.
            - The captain leading the war party should be very careful to discipline his troops because if any of his soldiers forces a woman from a province, he should be hanged on the spot.
            - If any soldier enters a house of a provincial and takes something, even a handful of corn, he should be punished according to the severity.
            - If any soldier strays from the royal road by a sling’s throw, his foot should be cut off.
            - If any of these soldiers enters a cornfield and takes even one ear of corn, his hand should be cut off and hung on a high pole in the same place with the ear of corn he took.
            - If any of the soldiers takes any livestock from transit, he should be hanged in the presence of the whole troop and the animal should be slaughtered, and the hide stuffed with straw and hung on the same rope as the hanged man.
            - If the war captain does not enforce these laws, upon returning to Cuzco, even in victory, he should be publicly hanged, and he should not be buried or given any funeral honors.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        they were just taking shots at shitty european cities

  4. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >dude roads lmao

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >if a libertarian calls out this argument he is being a chud
      >but Incas are based for having roads like the Romans did 2k years after

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Who gives a shit how long after the Romans they had roads? They arent a derivative culture.

  5. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    this guy who elevates the Amerindian to several months, I wonder if his sources are reliable

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      the guy who does what now

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