My first book

Release day is here who is copping this

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Nothing Ever Happens Shirt $21.68

  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Waiting for an epub 😉

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Jesus christ.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/KeYXDDu.png

      lol

      redscare podcast and it's consequences have been a disaster for zoomer women and homosexuals.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/KeYXDDu.png

      lol

      see, this was a fun read
      in fact, I realize this is hard to write well and she has talent
      BUT there is a glaring flaw with it, and that is the fact that it's entirely comprised of terminology and specific actions tied to the cultural expression of the last (at max) couple of years, and it is already losing relevancy
      >muh relevancy
      I mean that these words are little boxes in which people have become accustomed to perceiving reality in, and the boxes are rapidly changing as time goes on
      the boxes a classical-culture-pilled gymbro is thinking in in 2024 are going to be vastly different from a bohemian AI-pilled fashionbro from 2034
      the piece is going to lose relevancy faster than any other work of literature, unfortunately, because it reduces human interactions to the conditions that make the exact depicted form possible

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >because it reduces human interactions to the conditions that make the exact depicted form possible
        it's worse than that, the style is not really fit for expressing "interactions" at all. these online culture expressions are about signalling identity, they're far too abstract and static for narrative fiction. "he was like fight club and the matrix, she was like office space and american beauty" is not just lame because the references are outdated, it would have also been lame in 1999. narrative prose needs concrete images and actions, not just a narcissistic obsession with defining everyone's "vibes"

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I can’t judge the whole book from the passages that have been posted, but just from what I’ve read, she completely misunderstands what art is and how it works. She’s not creating universal art here. She’s writing for a very particular audience of hyper-online subcultural groups from Brooklyn who are familiar with what’s discussed on Twitter and IQfy. She’s not representing our generations from an external perspective to analyze the effects the internet has on us and how we communicate in the noise. She IS the noise. She’s writing slop to be a part of the slop. It’s narcissistic garbage and entirely expected from a mid 20s white woman who thinks she’s gonna be the Hemingway of our generation. This writing has no staying power or impact whatsoever.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          The universal is in the particular.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/KeYXDDu.png

      lol

      This would have been rip roaring hilarious 5 or so years ago. I'm over the whole Paul Town-type internet in-joke book thing.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous
      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Ok, that one's written by you anon.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/KeYXDDu.png

      lol

      [...]
      see, this was a fun read
      in fact, I realize this is hard to write well and she has talent
      BUT there is a glaring flaw with it, and that is the fact that it's entirely comprised of terminology and specific actions tied to the cultural expression of the last (at max) couple of years, and it is already losing relevancy
      >muh relevancy
      I mean that these words are little boxes in which people have become accustomed to perceiving reality in, and the boxes are rapidly changing as time goes on
      the boxes a classical-culture-pilled gymbro is thinking in in 2024 are going to be vastly different from a bohemian AI-pilled fashionbro from 2034
      the piece is going to lose relevancy faster than any other work of literature, unfortunately, because it reduces human interactions to the conditions that make the exact depicted form possible

      >because it reduces human interactions to the conditions that make the exact depicted form possible
      it's worse than that, the style is not really fit for expressing "interactions" at all. these online culture expressions are about signalling identity, they're far too abstract and static for narrative fiction. "he was like fight club and the matrix, she was like office space and american beauty" is not just lame because the references are outdated, it would have also been lame in 1999. narrative prose needs concrete images and actions, not just a narcissistic obsession with defining everyone's "vibes"

      It's amazing how the language has been reduced to obsession with signs and recognising them. Empty signifiers, shibboleths to prove how cool you are, dorky laughs, I get the references I'm self aware, self critiquing, ironic, I live in the zeitgeist, oh merry me, oh God, oh my, oh my, this is just like my favourite IQfy posts and insular tiktok communities, I love being part of the new edge, being in the know, blah blah blah.

      https://i.imgur.com/EN5OCi8.jpeg

      >

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      This is just ready player one for zoomers.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >woman tell us in detail how she spent months changing her personality to imitate the Chad she wants to get
        Surprisingly self aware

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Genuinely have a nice day if you can read this and take it seriously

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/KeYXDDu.png

      lol

      This is funny but reading 100+ pages of this would be exhausting

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      puking emoji

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Monkey covering eyes emoji. Anime nosebleed GIF. Henlo frend. hiiii.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      It's not so bad if you read it in a robotic voice.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/KeYXDDu.png

      lol

      >He was a boy, she was a girl
      >Can I make it any more obvious?
      >He was a punk, she did ballet
      >What more can I say?
      >He wanted her, she'd never tell
      >Secretly she wanted him as well
      >But all of her friends stuck up their nose
      >They had a problem with his baggy clothes
      >
      >He was a skater boy, she said, "See you later, boy"
      >He wasn't good enough for her
      >She had a pretty face, but her head was up in space
      >She needed to come back down to Earth
      I wonder if there's any inspiration from this song to her book.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/KeYXDDu.png

      lol

      best shit I've read all day lmao

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Okay, so you hate Ulysses and Finnegans Wake?

      Fricking LMAO at this TTTrash
      Bennington is a joke

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/KeYXDDu.png

      lol

      dios mio

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/KeYXDDu.png

      lol

      This looks like a zoomerfied version of the type of stuff I would write when I was 15. Sort of stream of consciousness, try hard artsty fartsy stuff. This way of writing is basically a way of masquerading the fact that you don't have any literary skills, and the insecurity of not being capable of writing anything of substance, so you decide to heavily lean on style above all else. It also has the double whammy effect of acting as a shield against criticism -"haha, you just don't get it, it's just post-ironic hyper-pop stream of consciousnesses webcore, it's just my style!".
      Very common in young artists (of all kinds, not only wannabe authors). Usually sophomoric stuff like this just stays a .txt on your hard drive, but she's a israelite-woman wombo combo so embarrassingly this actually ended up being published.
      I also just googled her age and apparently she's 26, which is all the more embarrassing. This is why you gotta start practicing young, so you can get this type of cringe stuff out of the way when you're like 16.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I miss avclub

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I don't know how it turned out to be even worse than I expected when I already had no expectations.

      [...]
      Are we just never going to get a good, young 21st century writer

      I'm working on it. Turns out writing a book is hard when it's not a twitter-esque mental dump by a chronically online woman.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/KeYXDDu.png

      lol

      This could be good if it were more parodic and venomous.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/KeYXDDu.png

      lol

      Maybe the Chinese are right in saying the west is in a terminal state of moral, intellectual, and cultural decline.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        No

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/KeYXDDu.png

      lol

      I like it

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      genuinely made me feel nauseous.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    lol

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I'll be brief: I hate woman

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      'this is pretty shitty. if you read one page of this it's okay, but imagine reading a whole book like this. this is why gimmicky shit never goes anywhere. it's always a dead-end.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Okay, so you hate Ulysses and Finnegans Wake?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          There's no way you're comparing a zoomer meme language book to Joyce...

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            No, but both use highly stylized prose that draws attention to itself and deviates strongly from every day language

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >deviates strongly from every day language
            That's because Finnegans Wake is in every night language.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Underrated post

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            You're being too objective. It's like saying pasta with ketchup is similar to a 4-star Italian bolognese dish because they both have pasta and a sauce derived from tomatoes.
            >bro, you don't like pasta with ketchup? it's the exact same thing

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Like most modern art, it's cool when an idea is expressed for the first time, but only then.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          The difference is gamers are even more subhuman than the Irish.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          It reads like Pynchon.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            No it doesn't

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          yes, they're just as bad if not worse

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Yes, yes, yes, I do.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Sun and Steel
      >hikkikomori
      >femcel
      >Serial Experiments Lain
      So this is based on IQfy? Or is there some proxy involved?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/DhBHKw0.jpeg

      Jesus christ.

      Are we just never going to get a good, young 21st century writer

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        If I ever get published, yeah. I actually got something brewing that's unique while not being dogshit

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Anon, if I ever decide to accept my fate as a wagie and quit applying for jobs on my off days I’ll be the writer you are waiting for. I’ll mail you my first book too.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/DhBHKw0.jpeg

      Jesus christ.

      the type of people who'd read this will blow their brains out in 5 years

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/DhBHKw0.jpeg

      Jesus christ.

      ...what the frick did I just read?

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    So this dogshit is like ready player one but with references only the xool kids will get? Hard pass on this nepo baby israelite drivel.

    Can anyone think of a single reason why one'd read this shit instead of just going to twitter, or here, or the secret discord, where the author took the ideas from to begin with?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Probably because the target audience is unironic Facebook Gen Xers and millennial academics who use Twitter/IG with varying levels of self-loathing

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It's amazing how the language has been reduced to obsession with signs and recognising them. Empty signifiers, shibboleths to prove how cool you are, dorky laughs, I get the references I'm self aware, self critiquing, ironic, I live in the zeitgeist, oh merry me, oh God, oh my, oh my, this is just like my favourite IQfy posts and insular tiktok communities, I love being part of the new edge, being in the know, blah blah blah.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      this is probably the last generation that's still halfway aware of the idiocy of it and tries to ironize engaging in it. In the future this will just be natural language.
      The medium is not only the message, but the baking tray for conscioussness. And the only way to navigate an infinite sea of information is via reductiveness, scrambling along references to references... Complex thought disintegrates. Just like you can't build cathedrals on a swamp.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Holy frick I fricking hate women.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      There has to be thousands of unread books by male authors who write like this, who have far worse talent than her

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Man I’m mentoring a student who is a zoomer and his prose is fun but so antiquated. I worry he’s not going to make it.
    >Padding aft to the wienerpit, I put the wheel over so that the breeze would turn Kipper’s bow toward the exit of the bay, rather than pushing her longways. At low speed, in low wind, all such inputs are languidly exaggerated and it was minutes before she swung round and I centered the wheel again. Sheeting out, I put her on a beam reach. I could feel some tension now in her rigging, as, even in light wind, thousands of pounds of silent force began to grasp us and press us onward.
    >In reverie, I nosed Kipper north-northeast with the sunset behind me. As I passed out of the lee of the bay and Shark Light’s beam flicked on, sweeping across me, the wind rose and the water flowing along her crimson boot-topping began to stream rather than burble by. It remained gentle enough though, that I needed only to rest an arm on a spoke of the wheel to keep it centered. Some liner, her lights pouring from every porthole and promenade to dance on the water, loped inbound to Sydney about a mile distant. I passed safely behind and felt Kipper dip, her bowsprit kissing a wavetop, then rise gently as I crossed the wake. I regarded the liner’s cruiser stern, uplighters picking out her name and registry and shining on the pale faces of fascinated passengers as they peered down to watch the lines of whitecaps cut by her screws recede into the Pacific dusk. For most, the Channel, Biscay, the Mediterranean, the Suez, the Arabian Sea and Indian Ocean had passed by just the same as their turbine-driven stately home traced the old Royal Mail routes on warrants still signed Victoria Regina.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      That's wonderful, but I agree that there's less patience for that style, unfortunately.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      That's wonderful, but I agree that there's less patience for that style, unfortunately.

      >google search that passage
      >no results

      Holy shit anon. If that’s really your mentee stop posting his shit here and help him get published. That’s some of the best prose I’ve seen from a young person.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      It's not really that it's antiquated. It's just way over-written.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Reddit tier critique.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      BIM BIM BIM BIM

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Elaborate on this.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          you must say the thing, the thing. it's the atomic age!

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Stopped reading after second BIM

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Very far from being good. He's trying to convey the beauty of going out to sea, but he's describing it the same way a detective describes their approach to a crime scene; just details, details, details, without feeling or wider effect, as

      It's not really that it's antiquated. It's just way over-written.

      said. The majority of it is merely actions that the main character takes -- steering the ship and looking around -- and the few moments of (attempts at) beauty there are here are buried between these actions; he never pauses to admire a vista, the way a real person would and the way you'd want the reader to, nor does he dilute it through the main character's perception to show us how *their* perspective works. It's boneless.
      This is why simply imitating a style isn't enough. You have to know what to write, too.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I don’t think this exactly fair. It reads like travel writing and reminds of Paul Theroux, in a way. I think the passage is more a meditation on the British empire (look how he ends it) than an attempt to describe going out to sea. Wouldn’t trying to convince the audience that is beautiful be extremely trite, anyway?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        perfect example of why writers should be extremely pick as to who's criticism they decide to listen to.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          In what way? He’s harsh but fair IMO.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        lmao stick to your genreshit

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          THAT is genreshit

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >everything I don’t like is genreshit
            Take the rope.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    the audible sample on amazon is tedious

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    a lot of extremely jealous bitter incels in this thread as expected! upset a female smarter and wittier than you published a book eh?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      shut up, hole. nobody's talking to you.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    morons on Agora Road have already mastered this style.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >God as some sort of strange creature-very Cobson like

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        You really need a terminally online user to write an accurate and genuine novel about the modern internet.

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Is she, you know... that last name.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous
    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous
      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        or mayhaps it be a mere ironical jest thoughbeit

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          https://i.imgur.com/F6R0SVX.jpeg

          she's a part of that dimes square crowd so it's not surprising that what she writes lacks sincerity and authenticity. there's no way that her writing will resonate with anybody except the same kind of edgelords that inhabit that world. without her connections she would not have gotten published. though i don't even know who published this novel. is it even a reputable publisher? probably not.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Penguin Press i.e. Penguin Random House

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >The following stories were previously published
            It's a story collection? I didn't even get this. Has anyone noticed how publishers don't put "stories" on the cover? I think it's because short story collections don't sell well. So they strategically (?) put no genre label on the cover and people mistake it for a novel. Lol.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            "stories" are mentioned in the very first line of the blurb

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Does she reference the sharty?

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    frick its not on libgen

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      https://send.cm/d/15x1r

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Can someone confirm this is the book and not 'p

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          It's up on zlib

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          serious question and related to the thread: why are zoomers so afraid of technology? you'd think they'd be very blase about it having grown up with it, but instead i always see them going "n-no i won't click that link what if it's a VIRUS, n-no i won't type into the command line what if i BREAK MY COMPUTER" like you'd expect out of some trembling grandma

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >My First Book - Honor Levy.epub
        Hero of the thread.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          we need to nuke whatever 48 year old single white woman read this and thought "YAASS QUEEN, SLAY!". Absolute brain rot. God save us.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Her name was Giancarlo Di Trapano

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >he was [male pop culture reference]
          >she was [female pop culture reference]
          >he did [thing i saw in a black and white gif on tumblr in 2011]
          >she did [thing that would only fit in with a tumblr blog that had a white and pink theme with only pastel colours]
          can i really just write like this in short disconnected sentences and get published? christ not even matty healy could write something this fricking dreadful.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >pop culture reference
            Half of that slop is downstream of this shithole, and the other half is downstream of (frog)Twitter, which itself right now is one of the multiple failed abortions of this shithole. Tumblr didn't do this, you did.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            online culture is pop culture. hyperreality is undeniable.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I bet you feel really smart rn

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            quite the opposite having read honor levys writing after entering this thread, sensory equivalent of a hammer to the skull i would imagine

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        https://i.imgur.com/PODhvLs.png

        >My First Book - Honor Levy.epub
        Hero of the thread.

        I can’t download shit from that link and I’m frustrated and wondering whether I’m getting trolled. I’m an idiot to open such a shady link, anyway, but I’m admittedly iphoneposting with Safari, which is surprisingly pretty much virus-proof. Every time I click “download file”, it just opens another spam tab with those moronic “your iPhone has been hacked! Immediate action is required” pop-ups made by Indian scammers like I’m on some shitty porn site. Thanks for the picture of the first full page (or so it seems), anyway.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          first of all you shouldn't be downloading shit without adblock, but even with adblock turned off it's giving me popups a couple of times and then it downloads the file on the third click

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          try this
          homosexualdrain.com/u/2LHqRBSj
          replace "homosexual" with "pixel" because the homosexual spam filter won't let me post it

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    She was serving biblically accurate c**t
    He was gooning-cave-bitch-you-live-like-this-maxxing
    She was in her Fleabag life but Miyazaki romance at heart moment
    He was at his post-Tate manospherianism
    When they met they had to warn George Bush the painter because a second wiener had just hit the fencel pussy
    It wanst a creepypasta but he even got lost in her backdoors
    She didnt have to time to clean it beforehand so it was Peanut Butter Jelly Time

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It looks like what a boomer idea of a zoomer book would be

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Arrived 12 years too late

  17. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I was just posting about this book in that Great American Novel thread

    [...]

    [...]

    . Honestly, I think people on this board are going to hate it because of how accurately it describes them. I don't mean to say that in a negative way, but her writing does throw a light on the silly boxes people force themselves in today.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >her writing does throw a light on the silly boxes people force themselves in today
      in what way?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I talked about my thoughts on this topic in this thread if you're actually interested:

        [...]

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          no i mean in what way does she throw a light on it

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            She writes "faux" autofiction about people in her generation who have been damaged by over-socialization, porn addiction, self-inflicted mental illness, and the atomization of community. The people thinking she's just attempting to write unfunny internet satire are missing the point, and it's clear considering how pissed off everyone from all sides of the fake internet political "forum" are about her writing. They are angry on a personal level, deeper than they would be if they simply hated her prose. And if they aren't? Then they pretty much just prove her point by reacting so strongly despite how silly and moronic her stories are. To quote myself posting in that thread:
            >They revel in the aesthetic of the "wired" and take pride in being damaged. They view their atomization as a victory, truth as subjective, and irrationality as a mark of maturity.
            >The same obsessive (likely autistic) personalities are present across all of these LARPing communities. Furries, trannies, orthobros, tradcaths, etc. all have a high concentration of depressive, anxious, lonely individuals who've lived online for so long that their online personas have started to bleed into the real world.
            >It probably wouldn't be too far off to assume that the common themes in literature going forward will be "irreality" and "depersonalization", but like a furious acceptance of being subsumed into the mass identity rather than a fight against the tide of personalized collectivism.
            And other anons who expressed it all better than I ever could:
            >there is not an actual community but the impression of one which gets conjured up cybernetically but produces no children, no art, no literature, not even warm feelings, only a cold spite for un-sympathetic people you wouldn't even want to risk a shouting match with for fear of being further ostracized
            >Basically since our actual culture is dead (narratives that attach us to the world around us, and gives us integrated ways of acting and being that lets us function well with the people around us, and a sort of background with which we can deal with problems) and we constantly have to deal with endless different situations, people, and ideas with no clear separation larping gives us a way of restricting our perspective and focus so the issues are actually manageable. It's atleast A determinate frame you can take up restricting your focus, and giving you a way to act. The opposite being simply not having any sense of what you ought to be doing or focusing on, and simply inundated with unintelligible information.
            >If you want to exist in a meaningful way at all in "mass society" you need to take on an identity/group that is intelligible within that system, and that is those things people larp as.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            that's a big wall of text that doesn't answer my question at all. what did you learn from her writing?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >that's a big wall of text that doesn't answer my question at all.
            It did.
            >what did you learn from her writing?
            Nothing new, since it's not like anyone browsing this site doesn't already know how warped the mentality of this generation is. Everybody sees it, they just think their own LARP is more acceptable than the guy across the table's. Her stories are basically like turning on the lights in a kitchen full of wienerroaches; they were always there, though you may not have noticed them for anything but the noise they were making and the smell of what they were attracted to.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            you could have told me from the start that you didn't actually read the book we're discussing. thanks for wasting my time

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            None of this seems to be authentically capturing any kind of person whatsoever, though. No one here (or on twitter, or whatever) actually believes or behaves in any way you (or the author) just described. For one, perceiving a hard separation between the online and the real is a warped perspective. They already bleed together from the outset, it's not something that has any neat containment. The web aesthetic is totally forced because no one online actually views themselves as online in an online way. If you were to translate this into a bad movie, it would be people sitting at a computer with computer stickers on it and wearing a shirt with a mouse pointer.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >They view their atomization as a victory, truth as subjective, and irrationality as a mark of maturity.
            I don't believe I've ever seen anyone embody one of these points, let alone all of them. On the contrary, people here seem extremely against all of these things and lament them, or even if they're part of some in-group, the way they view these topics are more complex than this writing style gives credit. It's easy to pen some kind of damning parody if you just decide from the outside how deep you deign everyone else.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            The fact of the matter is that their views aren't actually all that complex. They really are expressed best in a parodic style. "But in all unbalanced minds the classification is idolized, passes for the end and not for a speedily exhaustible means, so that the walls of the system blend to their eye in the remote horizon with the walls of the universe; the luminaries of heaven seem to them hung on the arch their master built. They cannot imagine how you aliens have any right to see, — how you can see; ‘It must be somehow that you stole the light from us.’"
            >people here seem extremely against all of these things and lament them
            That's true. That doesn't stop them from actively participating in them.

            you could have told me from the start that you didn't actually read the book we're discussing. thanks for wasting my time

            No, I read it. What did you expect me to do, write a review for you? I answered your questions sincerely.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >That's true. That doesn't stop them from actively participating in them.
            Right, so ... it wouldn't resemble the string of buzzwords and one-dimensional strawmen that these excerpts present then.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >They view their atomization as a victory, truth as subjective, and irrationality as a mark of maturity.
            I don't believe I've ever seen anyone embody one of these points, let alone all of them. On the contrary, people here seem extremely against all of these things and lament them, or even if they're part of some in-group, the way they view these topics are more complex than this writing style gives credit. It's easy to pen some kind of damning parody if you just decide from the outside how deep you deign everyone else.

            The extent to which people genuinely seek the truth here (or most places, really) is extremely limited. It boils down to a reading list whether or not they chose what to read from a chart, since they're all being catered to by the same algorithm.

            >That's true. That doesn't stop them from actively participating in them.
            Right, so ... it wouldn't resemble the string of buzzwords and one-dimensional strawmen that these excerpts present then.

            It resembles the reality perfectly. No amount of LARPing will change the fact that most of these people just shopped for a personality online until they found one that felt like it'd fit for a time. There is no depth here, just smoke and mirrors, people desperately desiring identity. All that changes from group to group is the costume they wear and the jokes which make them laugh. It's not a strawman if their high-mindedness is really one-dimensional.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Although I take issue with the framing here as if you're saying desperate seeking for identity is something unique to internet culture, even though it has been much observed and parodied in older works ... that still doesn't change that the way these people go about gathering their identity doesn't look like these book excerpts. No one talks like that, and so if you strip away the surface jargon, you're left with ... behavior that is simplistic to the point of being less nuanced than even the worst example of a midwit. Actual people, even when shallow, are still more complicated than the excerpts.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >No, I read it. What did you expect me to do
            i expected you to back up the statement "her writing throws a light on..." with at least one concrete example of the insight you found in her writing, but every time i ask you just go "uuuhh yeah her writing, there sure are words in it, anyway what i think about the internet is blah blah blah." you 100% didn't read the book. frick off

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >that's a big wall of text that doesn't answer my question at all.
            It did.
            >what did you learn from her writing?
            Nothing new, since it's not like anyone browsing this site doesn't already know how warped the mentality of this generation is. Everybody sees it, they just think their own LARP is more acceptable than the guy across the table's. Her stories are basically like turning on the lights in a kitchen full of wienerroaches; they were always there, though you may not have noticed them for anything but the noise they were making and the smell of what they were attracted to.

            >Her stories are basically like turning on the lights in a kitchen full of wienerroaches; they were always there, though you may not have noticed them for anything but the noise they were making and the smell of what they were attracted to.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            yes, this the part were i became 100% certain you didn't read her at all lmao. if you had anything concrete to say you wouldn't have to bullshit like that

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            You have my pity about your marketing internship making you shill on the internet.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            > That's true. That doesn't stop them from actively participating in them.
            In relation to "them secretly having a subjective approach to truth", you don't know this. You assume this because it's more comfortable to assume that truth is impossible to find than to find the courage necessary to pursue it. Every normalgay does this; it's their #1 psychological defense mechanism when confronted with an actual worldview

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Sure, but it’s also artistically barren at the same time. I can appreciate the attempt at conveying these kinds of para-philosophical beliefs through an artistic medium — which is really just what I believe literature to be in the first place — but going too far into it as is clearly the case here makes the work abrasive and the message obscure. There’s a reason people consider Ulysses Joyce’s magnum opus and not Finnegan’s Wake. There’s a measure of sublimity and respect in Ulysses which just isn’t present in Finnegan’s Wake.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >There’s a reason people consider Ulysses Joyce’s magnum opus and not Finnegan’s Wake.
            Only midwits think that. Marshall McLuhan, Samuel Beckett, Umberto Eco, and others, chose the Wake.
            >'
            You're a moron

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >Marshall McLuhan, Samuel Beckett, Umberto Eco
            If Umberto Eco and Marshall McLuhan are your idea of a towering intellect I can see why you’d favor this kind of work over something with a little authenticity instead

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >filtered by McLuhan
            I’ll give you Eco

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Far from artistically barren, I think people just aren't willing to engage with it honestly. A lot of people are just going to make up their minds about her right out of the gate without trying to understand what she's doing. See

            [...]

            Although I take issue with the framing here as if you're saying desperate seeking for identity is something unique to internet culture, even though it has been much observed and parodied in older works ... that still doesn't change that the way these people go about gathering their identity doesn't look like these book excerpts. No one talks like that, and so if you strip away the surface jargon, you're left with ... behavior that is simplistic to the point of being less nuanced than even the worst example of a midwit. Actual people, even when shallow, are still more complicated than the excerpts.

            I'm not saying that it's unique to internet culture.
            >No one talks like that
            I've met quite a few people online who really do talk like that. They've usually got a transgender flag profile picture made on picrew. I don't think every single one of them is entirely serious about it, but you have to remember how many of these people are genuinely autistic (and proud of it).
            >going too far into it as is clearly the case here makes the work abrasive and the message obscure
            I don't think that's a fair criticism, honestly. I personally don't care if a work is abrasive and obscure. The Waste Land, The Sound and the Fury, Finnegan's Wake, The Syntactic Revolution, they're all at varying degrees of abrasiveness and obscurity, and I love them all. I just don't buy into the idea that Ulysses is more sublime than Finnegan's Wake for its restraint. Don't take this as me saying this book is anywhere near on the level of anything by Joyce, Faulkner, etc., though. I just thought it was a good read.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Yes, some of them talk like that ... here and there, on Twitter. But what about inbetween that? The excerpts here seem to present these people as like this 24/7, completely typified by their online persona. I just don't think even for the terminally online that this approaches sufficient verity, even for parody. As for me, I'm also basing my reaction off of her interviews and internet posts, which are shockingly vapid and not as probing or funny or anything compared to your typical edgelord she's trying to emulate, rib, capture, whatever. The problem with her genre of net culture is what it's competing with--how many people want to read a fictively-dressed version vs. continue their Twitter scroll? Any given Encyclopedia Dramatica article is a more compelling read, captures something more complex and sufficiently human, than any of the prose I've read so far. It seems like the only audience is the semi-impressed reviewers at NPR, who are too at a distance from places like here that they think it's being captured effectively, and will eat it up like a kind of strange bit of on the ground reporting ... even though they're totally unequipped to tell the difference between what would or wouldn't be authentic, anyway.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >Yes, some of them talk like that ... here and there, on Twitter. But what about inbetween that?
            That's a bit dismissive of the effect social media has on people and how widespread it is. Twitter, Discord, Instagram, TikTok, and so on are large platforms and you'd be hard pressed to find people without an account on at least one of those sites. The internet isn't entirely cut off from the real world, it bleeds into it. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cFQvFfkoJoE
            >completely typified by their online persona
            This is also rapidly becoming a reality. People are becoming less like themselves and more like their online personas, or rather there seems to be a loss of persona entirely. The line between the internet and reality is only going to get blurrier. As I said before, "a furious acceptance of being subsumed into the mass identity rather than a fight against the tide of personalized collectivism".
            >how many people want to read a fictively-dressed version vs. continue their Twitter scroll?
            Again, there's a whole lot more going on than just fictional or copied social media conversations.

            [...]

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            What does a "loss of persona" look like exactly? And what about engaging with the internet can't be applied to reading books? You read a book, it shapes you, you move around your life, it shapes you, you bring that to a book. A lot of discussions on what the internet is and how it works and its effects seem based on feelings or even fantasies, and not the actuality. Yes, you can say there's a blurring, but at what point are your romanticizing that because it sounds interesting? The post you link to tells me there's a conflict of morals, and there's sexual temptation, and there's failure to embody an adopted moral guidance ... that isn't exclusive to the internet, nor does the mere existence of themes and character dynamics mean they're excellent examples of same. I guess what I'm trying to say is I'm skeptical that beyond the appearance of having a point, I don't really think the genre of internet fiction is anything but arbitrarily drenched in recognizable (soon to be dated) jargon that is ultimately pointless.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >What does a "loss of persona" look like exactly?
            I'd say it looks like the current wave we have of embracing and affirming the fantasies and delusions of the mentally ill/easily manipulated. When people can no longer differentiate themselves from their persona, it's because their persona has been absorbed into who they really are. I alluded elsewhere to the phenomenon of creating personal realities by placing yourself in a feedback loop. That's what people are doing now, though it's nothing new; social media just galvanizes it.
            >And what about engaging with the internet can't be applied to reading books? You read a book, it shapes you, you move around your life, it shapes you, you bring that to a book.
            Well, books aren't people, of course. They aren't intelligent, and they don't take position as your friend (yet). Your friends do not exist in books: they exist online and, for many, only sometimes in real life. People also engage with the internet much more than they do books, so they're much more likely to be influenced by something someone says online than something written in a book. But all of this is beside the point. Anything books can do to influence young minds can be done better with the internet.
            >but at what point are your romanticizing that because it sounds interesting
            The last thing I want is for this to be true. It isn't even interesting, it just sucks.
            >that isn't exclusive to the internet
            It doesn't matter if it is. I don't know why you're so fixated on this or that being exclusive to the internet.
            >nor does the mere existence of themes and character dynamics mean they're excellent examples of same
            That's also beside the point, since I was replying to this:
            >She is mixing icarus, kamikaze and the cross in one paragraph and really saying nothing.
            It was never about them being excellent examples of those themes, but just illustrating that they do indeed exist in her work, and that the references are there for a reason beyond just being references.
            >I don't really think the genre of internet fiction is anything but arbitrarily drenched in recognizable (soon to be dated) jargon that is ultimately pointless.
            It certainly isn't anything spectacular yet. I just think that Levy could write something great in the future if she builds on what she already has.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >It doesn't matter if it is. I don't know why you're so fixated on this or that being exclusive to the internet
            Because to my mind if an aspect of fiction isn't pulling its weight, it's just weight. There's a reason so much of fiction of value that is "about" a subject is often indirect or discursive, yet paradoxically ends up capturing that subject more than if it was more direct or cataloging. Levy's stuff just seems like it's pasting itself with sequins endlessly. Her insta profile is Derpina for frick's sake, it's too fixated and self aware of its subject matter. It's an appropriative and exploitative approach, not natural at all and without any unique gain, like a filmmaker wearing a t-shirt of a stock photo of a movie camera. Even as an ironic or performance comment, it wastes its resources.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >how many people want to read a fictively-dressed version vs. continue their Twitter scroll?
            This is always going to be the ultimate problem with any attempt to capture the Internet in fiction.
            Perhaps the only way I can think of to get around that is to set the story in an Internet that the reader can't access for themselves, which means either a bygone Internet based on forums and dial-up or an entirely fictional Internet. But then you're more likely to run into problems of verisimilitude.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Levy's approach to the subject, politics, and her style are all deeply flawed (which I won't get into here). Yet, her idea of depersonilzation through being coddled on the internet and your idea of literature next big theme being depersonilzation (which I think is an idea Levy would probably agree with) is an idea that has the most potential and will probably be killer of post-modernism in the mainstream, in due time.

            Post-modernism is all about looking inward into modernity and the structure of everything, with irony. The current floating idea that is slowly remerging is depersonilzation through powerful structures akin to og modernity and a style that's aware of one's depersonalization either consciously, subconsciously, or unconsciously (an example of unconsciously is bad books talking about race or shitty ya romantic fiction) this style and theme, in my opinion, is already starting to rewind the clock of all post-modernism stagnation.

            I'm of the opinion that post-modernism is on its hind legs through movies, but it isn't really all that relevant nowadays in literature. Levy would probably class herself as post-modernist if she were forced to pick, since she loves Bret Easton Ellis and writes a lot of autofiction. It's only when you realize how dated her internet speaks and the state of literature, do you get a real semblance of a nugget of truth. Her Internet style is a facade to the real truth in her writing and the pedestal being put on her through media is a certain desire that's more than just money. That idea is that Depersonilzation is unconscious, learned behavior. Levy seems to have some understanding of some of the effects of too much internet since it makes her seem like a total freak in rl interaction. Which can't fully be blamed on her, due to her being coddled on the internet, its only what she did with this coddeling, that is hers to blame. She seemed to lose focus on the internet and rl dynamic, and more on how the internet overpowers rl. So when she writes on the subject matter despite having half the truth, she fails.

            I think what needs to happen after people learn of Honor's mistakes as a writer and persona, is some up-and-comer who can fully encompass the connection of a internet persona and rl person, and how that connection happens in a depersonal society, consciously or unconsciously. If someone can make a great piece of literature on this idea, I think it'll make people aware that post-modernism is no longer the zeitgeist. For irony artistic style and theme, can't hide depersonlization that stirring around in all of us. The personal in all of us has become depersonal, whether consciously or not. Through forces like the internet putting it all on scrutiny in a daily flux.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            This is all reasonable, but the great internet-age novel won't come as a literal mirroring of internet culture/forms of communication, but, if at all, as some metaphorization of it. Judging from the excerpts itt, she's writing in basically a realist style - just piling up snippets of online culture that are supposed to make a whole. Some snippets are fun to read and clever, but if that's all there is, it's not worthy of a novel.
            A really great novel would capture the structure of the online experience without just cataloging it.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            That's what I'm going for in my own writing. It's not the focus. It's mostly there as fun subtext

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            yeah i just think it's stupid

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            That's fair.

  18. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Cool gimmick, but that's all it is. This kind of prose doesn't have any longevity, particuarly seeing as internet slang changes so rapidly, so in a year it's already going to be cringey and outdated. Its only merit will be to act as a sort of gen-z time capsule, which someone in the future may pick up as an oddity to write a video essay on. That's about it.
    She doesn't seem like a terrible writer, all things considered. And she's clearly a nepo baby, so she could make it quite big if she loses the gen-zisms.

  19. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >He’d tell her all this. He promised himself. Not yet, but soon. Soon all the living he’d done in this degenerate modernity—all the pain, the alienation of this domesticated zoo life, all the leg days and the pained pursuit of perfection, the looksmaxxing, the pinwheel sandwiches after the funeral, the larping, the posting, the kissless, hugless, handholdless virgin days—would be worth it. He messaged her, I wish you were real lol and she replied, sometimes I don’t feel real and he replied, lmao. He wasn’t actually laughing, he couldn’t while his tongue was pressed hard to the roof of his mouth like the forums had taught him to. I want you, he typed, imagining his fingers on her skin, pressing down hard on each key. Blushing emoji, she replied almost instantly. He was Pyramus. She was Thisbe.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >book presented as deeply "getting" internet culture
      >takes things said on the internet literally

      The amount of people who sincerely do the tongue thing vs joke about it online is a mystery, not a fact

  20. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    if you could read finnegan's wake you could read this zoomer version too

  21. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >attempting to "learn something" from some 26 year old hipster socialite meme girl rather than just reading it for humor and entertainment

  22. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    dimes square sucks.
    the people here are so vapid and uninteresting. obsessed with social status and always jockeying for clout. it’s disgusting, and also so boring
    can’t wait to move upstate and be alone in the woods with my boo

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I agree walter

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I agree walter

      [screencap of that dasha tumblr post where she says 'i'm just trying to get famous' that i don't care to find]

  23. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    wait a minute did israeli white women just steal our incel culture? how is this allowed, fricking culture vulture frauds.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      it's a young millennial's impression of whatever gen Z is.

  24. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    For me, the difficulty is that I don't read in order to see "my time" mirrored in a book. I have a minimal interest in reading depictions of my generation, class, or region, and I do not try to find those things in novels.

  25. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    unfortunately the whole book isnt written like these excerpts and like 90% of it is boring female blog style alt lit stuff that will only appeal to similsr females and seems like its from that 2014 scene or something. if it was all written in the crazed zoomer adderall talk itd be better but theres a lot thats sort of "look mom look lit industry boomers im a good writer too with serious thoughts its not just a gimmick look im gonna write about abortion now"

  26. 1 month ago
    Anonymous
    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Can confirm this is from the book. Haven't read anything else from it, but this passage is disappointing. I thought the idea might go somewhere interesting at first, but more than half of it is just word definitions with suggested alternate future definitions that are...also entirely valid definitions right now, without the added accelerationist/hedonistic/technofuture premise that's poorly laid overtop. Feels very self-congratulatory, as if the second definitions are at all unique; maybe I'm losing some key piece of information on account of this being an excerpt, but this is autofiction, right? so I don't imagine a good excuse.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        What reader is that you're using?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Icecream Ebook Reader. I don't normally read ebooks on my computer, so this is just whatever out of date version I installed years ago. Good enough to check random epubs at least.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Do you normally read ebooks on your phone? I only ever read them on my computer because the screen is bigger.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I use an e-reader, like with a proper e-ink display. I'd feel like shit trying to read a novel on my computer screen.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I try not to read israelites

      here's an example of why I don't read israelites
      you know how she managed to get published? because uncle maury over at the publishing company tossed his niece a bone. her abba and him got to talking after the mohel sucked on her little cousin's bloody shmeckel last year

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Sure, but besides any nepotism there's still going to be an underlying belief from the execs that the book will make them money. You can say there are better similar writers, but the point is that something about the style and substance of this one is enough for some exec to okay it and allocate it an advertising fund. These people still want to make money, and the nepo criticism only means they're not doing it as efficiently as they could, not that they're ditching the money entirely for the sake of family.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >there's still going to be an underlying belief from the execs that the book will make them money
          no. not at all. these companies make money from handful of uber bestselling authors and laundering money for political books. the rest of the shit they put out is purely for creating cultural cache and backpatting. money is the absolute last reason this was published. it was not designed to make a single, red cent. it's a literary void, printed at a loss

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            You don't think it's a bit of betting going on? You get however many of these people in a year and advertise them and you hope one turns big or gets you your money back. Play a game of averages and even the losses on some or many can net positive, and the mental math behind choosing those people is going to be "more likely to be worth it than not." Those bestsellers have to come from somewhere too. But sure man, I'm sure those greedy israelites love their losses.

            I'm not suggesting this book in particular is going to be or is worth being a bestseller, but it's not unreasonable to suggest that the calculus behind choosing it includes a belief that it will make money.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            It will make money because she's israeli. It's also how she got published.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >it was not designed to make a single, red cent. it's a literary void, printed at a loss
            >It will make money because she's israeli
            You don't look like the guy I was replying to, but come the frick on. Go ahead an elaborate if you're going to take a new tangent.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            If you're israeli you're pre-destined to find success in some media field. quite simple

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            those two things are by no means mutually exclusive, you'd be surprised what creative accounting, government grants, tax writeoffs, and so on can achieve despite on paper losing significant amounts of money

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Books are sold through marketing, not inherent quality. Push an author up as le voice of a generation, have your house homie critics write some raving reviews, create a public persona for the writer (cute weirdo girl works excellently) and you got an assured nyt bestseller.
          Nepotism is actually quite efficient because money and influence remains within a tight-knit group and can be reliably controlled. Why does the mafia work as a family and doesn't headhunt for the "best" criminal professionals? They know working as a community in the end will have more impact than spreading yourself out in search for maximum quality.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        damn dude, you're a real nasty hardcore beast. it's a shame you don't show up at rallies to contribute with that absolutely filthiness I can tell you embody at every level. you got a uniform or any tats or what? I bet we get you in a uniform, put you out in public you'll absolutely go off.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          the israeli genital mutilation cult must be exterminated for crimes against humanity
          death to israel and death to all yahweh worshipers

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            yeah you say that and act all deranged on IQfy but you don't actually show up at rallies. shame!

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            they let Black folk burn the cities and the political and media establishment had their backs the whole way
            now some college morons are protesting israel and the police batons are swinging
            ZOG runs the government, for now, but the debt is out of control and inflation is getting out of control
            change is made through assassination, not protesting on the street

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous
    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      It doesn't seem much like a novel. Reads more like an essay or blogpost.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      it turns out this isn't even a novel. it's a short story collection though maybe she doesn't know the difference between a short story and an essay.

      https://i.imgur.com/w5Gprzv.png

      Penguin Press i.e. Penguin Random House

      then nepotism

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Words are magic, that's why it's called spelling.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I thought it was kind of cute, honestly.

  27. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I read the first few chapters of this earlier today, and my verdict is that Honor Levy is the zoomer version of Melissa Broder. Same extremely online and extremely mentally ill vibes, and very similar subject matter (the desperate pursuit of male validation, having your sexuality and body image shaped by the internet at a young age, confessing embarrassing things for shock value). The main difference is that Levy seems to be trying for a highly affected ironic and detached style, whereas Broder is more purely confessional and uncomfortably earnest. I don’t like either of them very much tbqh.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Women seem to lack the Faustian spirit. They can do a bit of prose poetry, write about their feelings and do some confessional self-analysis. But higher realms of abstraction? A vision of the vast metaphysical shadows of history? A will to construct cathedrals of language to manifest the sublime majesty of the celestial symphony? Nada. Nothing. They can't do it. They can't even understand it.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        It's understandable that you might perceive differences in artistic expression between genders, but it's important to approach such observations with a nuanced understanding. While historical contexts have often limited women's access to education and opportunities for creative expression, many women have indeed made significant contributions to literature, philosophy, and other fields requiring abstract thought and deep introspection.

        From Virginia Woolf to Emily Dickinson, Mary Shelley to George Eliot, there's a rich tradition of women writers who have delved into complex themes and abstract concepts. Additionally, contemporary authors like Donna Haraway, bell hooks, and Judith Butler continue to challenge and expand our understanding of metaphysical and abstract ideas.

        Creativity and intellectual capacity aren't determined by gender but are influenced by various factors including cultural norms, access to education, and societal expectations. It's essential to recognize and celebrate the diverse voices and perspectives that contribute to our understanding of the human experience.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          homies too lazy to write their own replies

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Saying that I dislike two specific female authors doesn’t mean that I believe women in general are incapable of understanding higher realms of abstraction and exploring complex themes in their writing. You sound like an arrogant, condescending idiot.

        It's understandable that you might perceive differences in artistic expression between genders, but it's important to approach such observations with a nuanced understanding. While historical contexts have often limited women's access to education and opportunities for creative expression, many women have indeed made significant contributions to literature, philosophy, and other fields requiring abstract thought and deep introspection.

        From Virginia Woolf to Emily Dickinson, Mary Shelley to George Eliot, there's a rich tradition of women writers who have delved into complex themes and abstract concepts. Additionally, contemporary authors like Donna Haraway, bell hooks, and Judith Butler continue to challenge and expand our understanding of metaphysical and abstract ideas.

        Creativity and intellectual capacity aren't determined by gender but are influenced by various factors including cultural norms, access to education, and societal expectations. It's essential to recognize and celebrate the diverse voices and perspectives that contribute to our understanding of the human experience.

        Frick off, you ChatGPT-addled subhuman.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        It's understandable that you might perceive differences in artistic expression between genders, but it's important to approach such observations with a nuanced understanding. While historical contexts have often limited women's access to education and opportunities for creative expression, many women have indeed made significant contributions to literature, philosophy, and other fields requiring abstract thought and deep introspection.

        From Virginia Woolf to Emily Dickinson, Mary Shelley to George Eliot, there's a rich tradition of women writers who have delved into complex themes and abstract concepts. Additionally, contemporary authors like Donna Haraway, bell hooks, and Judith Butler continue to challenge and expand our understanding of metaphysical and abstract ideas.

        Creativity and intellectual capacity aren't determined by gender but are influenced by various factors including cultural norms, access to education, and societal expectations. It's essential to recognize and celebrate the diverse voices and perspectives that contribute to our understanding of the human experience.

        Both of you should frick off forever

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Okay actually, upon rereading parts of both books in question, I was being unfair to by making that comparison. Honor is a significantly better writer than Melissa Broder (although that bar is on the floor) and at times her work is legitimately clever and entertaining, but a lot of her essays/stories just seem like pointless navel-gazing autofiction and ultimately feel vapid and insubstantial. She has talent, but needs to develop it. I’m curious to see what she’ll come up with in the next few years.

      I still haven’t found any zoomer writers who manage to incorporate the internet into their fiction in a way that satisfies me. Patricia Lockwood does a decent job of that in No One Is Talking About This, but she’s a millennial and so is writing from a different vantage point.

      Side note: I forgot how fricking disgusting Melissa Broder’s So Sad Today is. My First Book is much more tasteful.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Not fair to judge Broder on her Twitter meme book tbh. She's written two or three novels since then.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          After reading So Sad Today, I have no real interest in reading her novels. I’m curious though: have you read them, and would you consider them good?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Do you like Tao Lin?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I read the first chapter of Taipei after seeing it brought up in a thread a few months ago, and hated it so much that I didn’t continue. Do you like Tao Lin? Maybe I should force myself to give it another try and see if something clicks.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Maybe try 'Richard Yates' or his short story book. He does a few interesting things with the novel form, but since he himself is the subject of all his books that's the central polarizing factor that seems to divide people, lol.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Lockwood is terrible, only marginally better than Levy. Too much cringey self-absorbed journal blog crap. I've seen IQfy take the best stabs at the internet experience. But some mentally incel will never get major publishing.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >Lockwood is terrible, only marginally better than Levy.
          Absolutely moronic take. It’s over for you. She’s the voice of her generation. Sorry that you can’t appreciate kino.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            i've never read any of those people but i can tell from this post alone that you're some kind of moronic simp

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >mfw anon actually feels qualified to pass judgement on someone else’s opinion about a writer he hasn’t even read
            >mfw anon actually thinks that anyone who likes a female writer must be simping

            I could give a detailed explanation of why I love her writing, but it would only be wasted on you.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            i don't need to read her because i'm not judging her writing but your posting, and your posting reeks of a simp's desperation. everyone can smell it

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >your posting reeks of a simp's desperation
            I'm a straight woman who likes her work in large part because I find her life experiences relatable, but go off I guess

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Post it then. As a 27yr male who's been on the internet since he was 9, I found "No One Is Talking About This" unreadable.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >She’s the voice of her generation.
            Correct, but that doesn’t make her good at all.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Lockwood can at least hold a sentence, and sometimes even string a few together. Her problem is dull predictability, particularly when she's trying to be shocking. Like Moshfegh and all those creative writing people there is a kind of functional American cleanliness about it.

        Recently there's been a lot of Young writers trying to break away from that, and though I'm not sure mid 2020 internet schizo babble (perhaps a level removed from l33t speak) is the stylistic revolution they've been looking for, the new wanna be avant garde is at least trying to be different.
        This effort might be transparently simple and overly affected but at least she knows to do something new. If the first quarter of the century has been defined by an intentional avoidance of style (for commercial as well as ideological reasons) if literature is going to have any sort of staying power (forget about a comeback) we need more of that.

        Personal guesses that some kid on substack is going to figure this out and make a boatload of money.
        Then every masculinity coach and influencer will take notice until finally, 6 or 7 years too late, penguin will try and follow through.
        ( ,

        Lockwood is terrible, only marginally better than Levy. Too much cringey self-absorbed journal blog crap. I've seen IQfy take the best stabs at the internet experience. But some mentally incel will never get major publishing.

        )

  28. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    mf's really talk like israelites really are god's chosen people. shit, man, i don't mind.

  29. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    god I wish there was a world war. zoomers are done

  30. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >IQfygays shitting on a novel they haven't read for 154 posts meanwhile not even knowing it isn't even a novel

  31. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    probably her and all her friends are on this thread. Jonty, if you're reading this, just stop. you're a boomer with down syndrome and heroin addiction, you'll never be a girl online.

  32. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Kill Honor. Behead Honor. Roundhouse kick a Honor into granite. Slam dunk a Honor baby into the trashcan. Crucify filthy Honor. Defecate in Honors food. Launch Honor into the sun. Stir fry Honor in a wok. Toss Honor into active volcanoes. Judo throw Honor into a mineral grinder. Twist Honor heads off. Karate chop Honor in half.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Hi Honor

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      HONOR KICKING GOD IN THE FACE. HONOR KILLING GOD. HONOR EATING GOD. HONOR VOMITING GOD. GOD ON THE FLOOR. GOD IS DONE. GOD IS GONE. GOD IS DEAD. I AM FREE. I AM FREE OF GOD. I AM FREE OF ALL GOD'S JUDGMENT. I AM FREE OF ALL RELIGION. I AM FREE OF GOD'S RELIGION. I AM FREE OF ALL THE RELIGIONS OF GOD. I AM FREE OF THE RELIGIONS OF GOD. I AM FREE OF RELIGION. I AM FREE OF RELIGION IN MY TRUE RELIGIONS. ALL ASS. NO APOLOGIES. I AM FREE OF THE "I'M SORRY" GOD. I AM FREE OF THE "I'M SORRY" GOD. I AM FREE OF THE "I'M SORRY" GOD. I AM FREE OF THE "I'M SORRY" GOD. I AM FREE OF THE "I'M SORRY" GOD. I AM FREE OF THE "I'M SORRY" GOD. I AM FREE OF THE "I'M SORRY" GOD. I AM FREE OF THE "I'M SORRY" GOD. I AM STILL SO SORRY. I AM SO SO SO SORRY. I SHOULD BE SILENT NOW. I AM IN HELL. I’M SORRY GOD. I’M SORRY GOD. I’M SORRY GOD. I’M SORRY GOD. I AM SORRY GOD.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Ms. Levy, this is what happens when young people glom onto religion out of contrarianism.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        cringe

  33. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Imagine how shit it would be to be her reading this thread. It's a markov chain of
    >wow this is shit
    >wow this is great
    >nepobaby israelite
    >etc.
    and none of it feels good because the people who like it probably have awful taste (they're the same people this is being written about, but the dregs), and the handful of people willing to take it earnestly have zeroed in on the flaws she's probably already aware of (beyond the writing to an extent, into the nycnepojudaism stuff that she's definitely self-aware about if not self-conscious).

    Outside of it you've got the yes-men probably taking quirky photos of/with/for her, doing the regular milieu of altgay tricks, doing the right drugs and attending the right parties and cafes and so on, which no doubt feels incredibly shallow (these are also the same people she's writing about, but in the haute circles of its domain), all writing their own obvious drivel. And then there's a cesspit like this where you'd like to believe the interactions are more earnest but the vast majority of it is without substance and filtering ends up impossible but still it can manage to be incisive.

    All this because your PR guy has paid someone who told a guy to hire an Indian subcontractor to shill your book here, so all you can do is sit back and see how artificial it is while the discussion carves an ugly hole in your skull. (Else she made the thread herself, or some anon, but it doesn't really matter.) Imagine you've taken too much of whatever drug your not-really-a-friend last gave you and you're reading this. Imagine you secretly lust for recognition (maybe not more than anyone else) even if only in rejection but the honest reality is meaningless sewage. Imagine trying to write about what underpins this but somehow you've chosen a line that cannot in a million years intersect with your subject.

    Anyway, thanks for posting that epub, Honor. I'll read it just because I had a dream about you once where we talked in a school hallway in front of your locker.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      simp homosexual

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      master b8

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      The glazing is crazy. She ain't gonna let u cum inside her lil bro

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >man engages in performative empathy towards a mediocre arthoe because he wants to frick her
      many such cases

  34. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Read from it this morning.
    https://lithub.com/shoebox-world/
    Just looked like nonreflective creative nonfic from the average girl with identity issues. If it's fictional, the character she's rendered is sorta realistic, I guess, but there's no meaning or transformative power or informing aspect or anything to actually glean from reading the piece. Ot just looks like inane rambling from an unmedicated chick who has no desire to fix her own issues or seriously think about anything, which I can get anywhere on the internet.

    There's little skill to it. I probably could've written it, and I'm not that good of a writer. The repetition that's employed during the climax of the story is a very cheap/overused rhetorical device that isn't pleasing to read. The character's thoughts are too shallow to garner any sympathy or empathy from me. At the end of it, I just wanted her to shut up, which I succeeded in making her do by not reading the rest of the book.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Literally just alt-lit sekrit club shit with IQfy memes added to a slightly younger audience.

      >Ugh I can't stop taking pills
      >Ugh these pills maaaan
      >My ex-goyfriend used to punch the wall 🙁
      >I like this, I did this, I want this, I thought about this... Reminds me how much I hate being around self-absorbed young women

      Maybe it's because I'm in my thirties now, but this kind of writing just irritates me at this point. Ten years ago I would have probably read it, since I read Tao Lin etc, but even so the whole cultural climate just seems so different now.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Actually, I was being too harsh here. Reading some more excerpts I actually think it is quite entertaining, and self-aware enough to acknowledge that it is maybe necessarily post-cringe. It reminds me of Weirdcore music or whatever.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >post-cringe
          I do not ever want to read a book that is described like this. Bad on purpose? Come on, that has got to be the worst excuse for an artist in any discipline. Reading this is like scraping my eyes with sandpaper.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >https://lithub.com/shoebox-world/
      This isn't badly made based on the first couple of sentences, but holy shit, the "I took Adderall" trope is such a tired, beaten-down literary cliché at this point, it really makes me wonder what the author is thinking. It started around 1991 with American Psycho, went through various iterations like Tao Lin and now feels like the copy of the copy of the copy. Or maybe that's the point?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        In several interviews she says that BEE was a huge inspiration. She went to Bennington like he did too.

  35. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Honor, if you're reading this, you should consider changing your persona so you're not a pick me girl for the alt-right and most conservatives. You're doing yourselves zero favors trying to get an audience who'll always hate you and your work. 2nd stand up for yourselves. The articles I read of you make you seem like a pushover for your own beliefs. If you do this, your public perception will definitely get better. Best of luck

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Sorry, b***h, but the cool kids are all epic racists. And if this israelite wants our epic gamer dick, she'll write what tell her to write, how we tell her to write it. Capiche?

      Let this be a lesson to ya: Speak up again and I'll flush your head in the toilet and give you the meanest swirlie of your life. Then I'll ram my foot up your c**t. Also lose some weight.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        This is the most reddit thing I've ever read in my life, and it reeks of projection

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous
    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      She is clearly a redscare-ite. The female urbanite liberal-skeptical who uses the internet too much has already been alpha and beta tested by these hoes so there is nothing to worry about

  36. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I’m going to write a book about Zoomers much better than you have written here. You will all know my name soon enough. I can promise that.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      You just missed the trips, which I personally, would take as a message from the universe. I roll so you may rest in peace. Keep on rollin bbbyyy chocolate starfish

  37. 1 month ago
    Anonymous
  38. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    He was growing tomacco in a beat up planter on the balcony. She was wearing brown sweatpants that were supposed to be white. She was about to say it, the S already formed on her lips. He put a finger over her mouth. "Shhhhh, this is a Chuck apartment." he said.

  39. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    trips and my novel will my mog hers.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      brother you could vomit onto the pages and it would mog her book

  40. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    sounds like people are eating this shit up
    https://www.theguardian.com/books/article/2024/may/15/my-first-book-by-honor-levy-review-extremely-online
    >Levy writes in her own referential language, a lightspeed style that must be post-post-post modern. The lexicon of memes is important to Levy (though perhaps less so to any reader over, say, 28), so significant that she spends the longest section of her book explaining it to us. Z Was for Zoomer is Levy’s dictionary of online slang; an ABC of neologisms from the internet’s collective consciousness, often illustrated with the author’s personal experiences. I am 24 and have spent plenty of time online, enough to know what Levy is referencing when she writes that “fat bugs bunny is named Big Chungus”, but as a true historian of the web, Levy further fleshes out several concepts.

    >NERF, the toy gun company, stands for “non-expanding recreational foam”. Levy explains that to “nerf” is now a verb, to “weaken or make less dangerous”, a way of evening out the game. “A prevailing theory is that if we want to play fair, we should nerf rich white men,” writes Levy, but she has her doubts.

    I feel like I should be angry, but I am just sad. They don't want books from us that are good, they want meme-filled reference fests so they can jerk off over how difficult having ADHD is and how much the writer is on twitter all day. If a guy wrote this it would 100% be dismissed as cringe.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      neither you nor the person who wrote that review over at the guardian read the book.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Do you think I'd subject myself to this shitheap after reading the excerpts from this thread?
        I'm genuinely all ears for any defense you have for this kind of writing, because right now I feel crazy for knowing that it even got published. You'd be doing me a favour.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Weren't you just simping? Real abrupt change of pace here

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >Weren't you just simping? Real abrupt change of pace here

            >I feel like I should be angry, but I am just sad. They don't want books from us that are good, they want meme-filled reference fests so they can jerk off over how difficult having ADHD is and how much the writer is on twitter all day. If a guy wrote this it would 100% be dismissed as cringe.

            how the frick did you get 'simping' from that?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >enough to know what Levy is referencing when she writes that “fat bugs bunny is named Big Chungus”
      They don't know it started on this board.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Big Chungus was started by Jim Sterling who makes up stupid names for shit like this all the time

        t. meme historian

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Honor, easy on the reddit

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >I am 24 and have spent plenty of time online, enough to know what Levy is referencing when she writes that “fat bugs bunny is named Big Chungus”
      This single line is so awful I don't know where to start.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I hate it

  41. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Feels good to work harder than this. The universe collapses the tunnels of wasted youth..

  42. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Can someone key me in on this Levy gal? Why is there so much hype for this book when she doesn't have a Wikipedia page or even 10k x followers?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Levy
      hmmmmerbing

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      She wrote a book specifically for this board

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        To troll this board maybe, if anything this book seems like pure Twitter/Insta/Discord zoomer brain. Which is much of IQfy to be fair but it's a bit much to call it a IQfy book.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          It has references to shit that IQfy popularized

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            ok. it's too offputting to investigate further THOUGH

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      10 years late to the alt lit party, trying to do mid 2010s vintage viral marketing

      If she really wants to do it right she should go have sex with Tao Lin

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >go have sex with Tao Lin

        unironically true. you can't be a real (female) writer post-2000s if you haven't had sex with Tao Lin

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I don't think Tao Lin will have sex with any woman under 300lbs

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Isn't he a volcel now

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Why is there so much hype for this book when she doesn't have a Wikipedia page or even 10k x followers
      >debut author with none of the above has article written about her in a major publication
      israelite lauds israelite. nothing more than that

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        you say that as if that's a bad thing.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          considering judaism is a supremacist genital mutilation cult, it is

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      just ask the girl in the mirror

      also since this is the e-girl/IQfy books thread has anybody read this from the ads?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Why did you ignore the advice on /wg/, and critique general? Re-edit the book, its honestly unreadable? The esl mistakes are too prominent, especially in the first page.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          idk, ask him. i'm genuinely asking. the "everyone who posts about IQfy authors is the author" meme is kinda stale even if it might be true half the time. i bought the paperback version of ogden nesmer's eggplant then it was promptly destroyed in a storm by my leaking ceiling lel maybe i'll get another one.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >i bought the paperback version of ogden nesmer's eggplant then it was promptly destroyed in a storm by my leaking ceiling
            lol!

  43. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    There's something amusing in seeing well respected publishers jumping in on the schizo book bandwagon.

    Also based on what's been posted here her writing is actually worse than the stuff she was posting around 2020. But seeing as this is about as low effort as it gets I guess who gives a shit.

    Forced meme is forced.

  44. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I heard of Honor Levy for the first time yesterday. The excerpts look funny. I do not intend on reading the full book. I watched an interview w her. She's cute.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      She's not going to frick you dude.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Good. I don’t have to pretend to like her meme book then. I will not read it.

  45. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    honor levy moved away from nyc back to la in with her bf and says she wants to have kids. so much for the flourishing dimes square lit scene.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Do you ever think about how it's 2024 so there's a 95%+ chance she eats that guy's hairy butthole?

  46. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    dimes square girlies win again
    listen to the pod
    https://redscarepodcast.libsyn.com

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >the meme is now being stormfront racists

      gay also paul cupo is boring

  47. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    people who are going to actually read this should also check out LIVEBLOG by m. boyle

    megheads wwa

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Are you the anon who recommended LIVEBLOG to me in another thread a few months back, and compared it to Knausgaard’s My Struggle?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        No I don't really care for Knausgaard.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Lol okay, I guess there are multiple LIVEBLOG enthusiasts round these parts.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            tbh it might have been me i'm drunk 50% of the time i post here and maybe i was feeling knausgaard-y. there is at least a handful of megan boyle posters here for sure though.

  48. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    There was another "it girl" and "voice of her generation" in the mid 90's who got unearned attention from boomers who pretended to be hip
    Of course she never accomplished anything literary after that and became a lawyer and got unmerited jobs with law firms

  49. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    So how much did the publisher pay for this book? Anybody have any idea?

  50. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    took a peek at the book after scrollin thru this thread. the zoomer language does lessen in comparison to the first story, but overall the My First Novel isn't really that interesting. 4/10 I've read worse, but I've read a lot better books/anthologies as well

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Well, at least you admit that you're rating the book based on taking a peek

  51. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Went to school with this b***h. She smelled like tuna. Every single day.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Give us more lore, please

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >someone managed to progress to story two
      impressive

  52. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >funny_shitting_indian.jpg

  53. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I started reading it and it's better than I thought although nothing really stands out. I don't know why they put that moronic shit as the first story...it's easily the weakest one I've read so far.

    I mean she has some talent but she needs to do a lot more work and find her real voice.

  54. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I'm a young writer and no one cares. I live in Manhattan and I am writing about true love. If you want to know more, message me on Urbit. I am actually a good writer too, not just an e-girl. I will only see success in like 40 years, and I have no problem with that. This is all I can do. I am a writer.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Ru me? How do I contact?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >I will only see success in like 40 years

      i don't think it works like that

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