Name a programmer as productive as this lad

Name a programmer as productive as this lad

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  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Terry Davis

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    What is the usecase for 2.7 trillion digits of Pi?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Finding out whether that asteroid is or isn't part of your cosmic space-property with regards to rounding errors.

      https://i.imgur.com/gyC91G7.jpeg

      Name a programmer as productive as this lad

      Idk, is that really *good*?
      That's just really *a lot*.
      Carmack's fast inverse square root hack is good.
      Chris Sawyer's TTD/RCT in ASM is good.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Carmack's fast inverse square root hack is good.
        he stole it from CS academicucks because he's a sociopath (and based)

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Maybe.
          I mean, it is something you can figure out yourself, if you're a bit brighter than most.
          (Or maybe also a *lot* brighter, I have difficulty telling 😉

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            You can read about it on the wiki page. Here:

            >History
            >William Kahan and K.C. Ng at Berkeley wrote an unpublished paper in May 1986 describing how to calculate the square root using bit-fiddling techniques followed by Newton iterations.[4] In the late 1980s, Cleve Moler at Ardent Computer learned about this technique[5] and passed it along to his coworker Greg Walsh. Greg Walsh devised the now-famous constant and fast inverse square root algorithm. Gary Tarolli was consulting for Kubota, the company funding Ardent at the time, and likely brought the algorithm to 3dfx Interactive circa 1994.[6][7]

            >Jim Blinn demonstrated a simple approximation of the inverse square root in a 1997 column for IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications.[8] Reverse engineering of other contemporary 3D video games uncovered a variation of the algorithm in Activision's 1997 Interstate '76.[9]

            >Quake III Arena, a first-person shooter video game, was released in 1999 by id Software and used the algorithm. Brian Hook may have brought the algorithm from 3dfx to id Software.[6] A discussion of the code appeared on the Chinese developer forum CSDN in 2000,[10] and Usenet and the gamedev.net forum spread the code widely in 2002 and 2003.[11] Speculation arose as to who wrote the algorithm and how the constant was derived; some guessed John Carmack.[7] Quake III's full source code was released at QuakeCon 2005, but provided no answers. The authorship question was answered in 2006 when Greg Walsh contacted Beyond3D as their speculation gained popularity on Slashdot.[6]

            >In 2007 the algorithm was implemented in some dedicated hardware vertex shaders using field-programmable gate arrays (FPGA).[12][13]

            But stealing it is even better than coming up with it yourself.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          ideas can't be stolen
          they just are and you can use them

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        NASA uses 16 digits from what I can find.

        >Carmack's fast inverse square root hack is good.
        it's not his

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Carmack's
        Not his, he just used it.

  3. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Why should I care about "people" I'm never going to meet or interact with?
    Why should you? Is your life that sad?

  4. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    waste of time

  5. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous
  6. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Isn't this the madlad who made qemu? Love this guy.

    Also, IIRC, he broke the pi record in part by simply leaving his computer running for a long time in a closet.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Bingo! ffmpeg and tcc too
      https://bellard.org/

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Bingo! ffmpeg and tcc too
      https://bellard.org/

      I take back what I said.
      >by simply leaving his computer running for a long time in a closet
      Holy based!
      I thought he used a super-computer (in which case it would've been gratuitious).

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >I thought he used a super-computer (in which case it would've been gratuitious).
        that's what was incredible. he used a common desktop PC everybody has at home. a Japanese guy broke his record a few years later, but using a supercomputer in datacenter lab lol

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Bingo! ffmpeg and tcc too
      https://bellard.org/

      >qemu
      >ffmpeg
      Dude is just out there, casually spawning billion dollar industries.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        And yet he probably isn't even a millionaire, such is the life of freetard and academia cucks.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        And yet he probably isn't even a millionaire, such is the life of freetard and academia cucks.

        Worst of all, every Internet user in the world is using his software, directly or indirectly, yet nobody even knows his name.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Everybody in the world owes him something.
          Whether you choose to claim in monetarily in immediacy, is left to you.

  7. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Let me guess: you NEED more digits?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I need less
      π=3

  8. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Jon Blow

  9. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Mr. Nagoor Babu sir (M. Tech)

  10. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Once Stacy finds out that I've computed more digits of PI than anyone else, she'll totally want to have sex with me!

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