Now that the dust has settled, how do these works stack up when compared to the others in McCarthy's bibliography?

Now that the dust has settled, how do these works stack up when compared to the others in McCarthy's bibliography?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    a novel about math... yeah i think i'll skip this one...

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >t. filtered STEMlet

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Why did this homosexual hate punctuations so much?
    These books are unreadable garbage like his other trash.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >These books are unreadable garbage
      the problem here is the reader, my fellow.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Kys moron

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I was so pissed, here I am getting marked down on papers for not putting a period one time and this homosexual comes along and sells a million books without any fricking periods at all

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        he used periods. commas sometimes too.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        The difference is you're paying people to read what you write while people pay to read what he wrote.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      realized he would never be as good as the literary greats of the 1800s and petulantly dove in the other direction

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It's kind of crazy how many classic novels this big dickus has dropped, I didn't even know he dropped this weird duo novel

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I found them both pretty disappointing. McCarthy sets up an interesting mystery and doesn't really do anything with it.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      It's not about the mystery. It's about a bigger mystery: A life lived.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Filtered

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymouṡ

    They're patchy. There are some very good things in them but they don't (in my opinion) quite work as a whole.

    I guess they're in the third tier of CM's works:

    T1:
    Suttree, Blood Meridian

    T2:
    Border Trilogy

    T3:
    Outer Dark, Child of God, No Country, The Road, The Passenger & Stella Maris

    T4:
    The Sunset Limited, The Orchard Keeper, The Stonemason, The Gardener's Son, The Counselor

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      The Stonemason should be in Tier 2. Stella Maris should be in Tier 1.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      How can you dislike The Sunset Limited, man? It's indeed preachy, but McCarthy has always been preachy. Even Blood Meridian had the priest.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I really enjoyed both. Can anyone explain the significance of the plane crash and titular passenger in the first one? I feel like it was never resolved

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymouṡ

      >the significance of the plane crash and titular passenger
      I've heard a lot of pretentious crap talked about this and been singularly unimpressed. There isn't going to be any ‘cunning meaning’ which we need to decode by analyzing subtle references. It’s a novel not a crossword puzzle.

      I think the closest it might approach symbolism is as a physical analogue for an emotional or otherwise intangible issue that Bobby Western (or the book) is concerned with.

      This sort of thing is quite common. It's basically Raymond Carver's short story formula — he picks a person at an emotional crisis point in his life and then finds some naturally-occuring physical event or circumstance that exemplifies / resonates with it. For example, in Menudo, the narrator is involved in a break-up (caused by his drinking and infidelity). He visits a friend, who says he'll make him menudo (Mexican sort of stew/soup). But M.C. falls asleep (drunk or hungover) and when he wakes up he finds everyone else has eaten it all. That's what's happening in his marriage too. His wife had been trying to nourish him but he wouldn't (or couldn't) make use of it, and it all went to waste.

      These things needn't be so cookie-cutter (this symbolizes this, this symbolizes this). They can be quite abstract. And we don't have to recognize them (or, heaven forbid, "work them out") to benefit from the story. In fact it's probably better if we don't. The important question is, does the plane sequence feel ‘right’ in The Passenger, or not? Does it feel like a good metaphor? If it doesn't, ‘decoding’ it won't help, and if it does, decoding it isn't necessary. Also worth mentioning — Cormac himself probably didn't arrive at it intellectually. More likely he just picked it ‘by ear’. I don't much go in for the "death of the author" crap, but it applies a bit here, I think.

      That said, here's my best guess for the parallel:

      Bobby doesn't like to think that Alicia is gone forever. The crashed plane is like death, and the missing tenth passenger is like whatever you think escapes death. Materialists might say, what survives of a person is simply the consequences of his existence (including the memories of him in the minds of those left behind. As W. H. Auden put it, "He became his admirers".) Religious people would say, what survives of a person is the soul. Bobby hasn't got enough religious faith to be comforted in this way, but he *wants* to believe. So he searches for the tenth passenger, but loses the trail.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >and titular passenger in the first one?
      I'm pretty sure the passenger is somehow, perhaps in a metaphorical or even metaphysical way, supposed to be the Kid. I've heard some people saying the novel drops the mystery because it's trying to tell the reader that's how "real life" is, but I think it's the opposite. The key to solve the mystery of the novel is to connect the points as if it was a dream. In his later years McCarthy got obsessed with the unconscious mind and how it could understand things by itself and then communicate them to the conscious mind through symbols, and he even wrote two essays about it. I think that's how The Passenger is meant to be read. Under a realistic logic the Kid obviously can't obe the missing passenger, but in a dream logic it somehow makes sense. He even talks about himself as a passenger in a bus a few times. Not to mention he had webbed limbs, perfect to swim away.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      doesn't the kid appear to bobby later in the book? the mystery of the missing passenger and the plane felt like an echo of that

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The Passenger is simply leagues ahead of Stella Maris and nothing can convince me otherwise.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I enjoyed them quite a bit and I think everyone else will be dick riding them hard in 10-20 years

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >I think everyone else will be dick riding them hard in 10-20 years
      they already do lol film rights were bought even

      https://i.imgur.com/6D10Wje.jpg

      Now that the dust has settled, how do these works stack up when compared to the others in McCarthy's bibliography?

      a total disappointment

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    do you think mccarthy actually knew anything about grothendieck's work or did he just namedrop him to seem intelligent?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Apparently he read everything he wrote, so I don't know if it was some skimming getting the most out of it or he understood the math, either way, he was really well read on his theories.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        He got the math parts good enough for a layman to read, but poorly enough to turn a mathematician off this. Such as Alicia treating topology as something inscrutable right after an esoteric subject that didn't get remotely the same treatment; even though topology is a mandatory undergrad course. I suppose McCarthy watched one too many of the "so deep, bro" YouTube videos turning cups into a donuts.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >Alicia treating topology as something inscrutable
          lmao wow

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Do you have any idea how impenetrable topology gets how fast?

          ?si=VxzfhTP2jlWStVDt

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Stella Maris:
            >Could you explain topology in something like that straightforward a manner?
            >You're not being facetious?
            >No. I'm not.
            >I dont think so.
            And then the namedrops the Poincaré conjecture. Like, really? There's a semester worth of topology she could have used before dropping the Poincaré. Topology doesn't turn into anything that can't be vaguely explained to a simple person until maybe the fundamental group; point-set topology is pretty damn explainable in the same way she handwaved another subject a few pages before.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Alicia wasn't giving a seminar on topology that she should have begun with undergrad topics. Her field was fairly advanced topology and that's what cohen asked about. Their conversation had veered into deep waters by that point.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Stella Maris:
          >Could you explain topology in something like that straightforward a manner?
          >You're not being facetious?
          >No. I'm not.
          >I dont think so.
          And then the namedrops the Poincaré conjecture. Like, really? There's a semester worth of topology she could have used before dropping the Poincaré. Topology doesn't turn into anything that can't be vaguely explained to a simple person until maybe the fundamental group; point-set topology is pretty damn explainable in the same way she handwaved another subject a few pages before.

          Math is gay and stupid, the most based part of SM was when alicia brought up how Wittgenstein convinced Russel to give up math entirely after convincing him it was all tautology

          Do you have any idea how impenetrable topology gets how fast?

          ?si=VxzfhTP2jlWStVDt

          >yeah bro heres some extremely complex masturbatory equations to describe whats happening with a substance that could never exist in reality and has virtually zero practical purpose
          Why are mathgays like this

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >Why are mathgays like this
            beauty is truth--truth beauty

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I felt the same about when she was talking about music in Stella Maris. A decent impersonation of someone who's studied classical music talking about it that didn't quite ring true.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >muh science! muh trannies! muh smart dialogue!
    His most reddit book by far

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Easily his worst book. Its honestly feels like a draft from his Orchard Keeper days.
    Its a shame it replaced The Road as his his final novel. Thematically, The Road is a perfect last novel.

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    He was met with initial rejection due to it's very STEM focused subject matter, but I feel like they are books that will only ripen with age and become more accepted, like Blood Meridian was. There is a great deal to like about them

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It felt a lot like McCarthy writing in the same style as the Glass family saga, and I love those short stories, so I naturally liked The Passenger and Stella Maris. In particular I loved Alice, which doesn't seem to be a popular opinion, and I get it, because usually I dislike women too, but she and the kid where the best part of these books for me. The one thing that keeps me from calling them a masterpiece though is that McCarthy over did it by making almost every single character as smart and precious as the Glass kids. I get that the guy spent his last years talking with geniuses daily, so perhaps that type of conversations became commonplace for him, but when everyone is a small time hustler who is also a big brained philosopher then it's hard not to feel it's all staged and it takes away from Bobby and, specially, Alice's supposed tragedy of being so smart that they are detached from the world.

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I was kinda meh on The Passenger at first, then loved Stella Maris. But I find myself thinking about them both from time to time enjoying The Passenger more and more in retrospect, and them both as a complete thing. The kind of literature that grows in your mind and slowly sinks into you. I'll probably reread soon.

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    How do you picture Alice, bros? For me she was like a young Pamela Anderson dressed as a librarian. No wonder Bobby wanted to hit it.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Something in between Daniela Witten and Daphne Koller. Witten grooms herself for Twitter too much, so sprinkle some Koller in there, or maybe Marina von Neumann Whitman.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Bro, those b***hes are plain as frick. Alice is supposed to be banging.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Bro, Edward Witten. John von Neumann. John. Von. Neumann. Witten. if you don't find those genes irresistibly attractive, I don't know what to tell you. See a conversion therapist!?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymouṡ

      >young Pamela Anderson
      She's very thin, borderline anorexic, in Stella Maris. Perhaps not quite as bad before that but still thin, I think.

      "Thin" isn't the word that springs to mind when I think of Pamela Anderson.

      We're not told much about her appearance. She's very beautiful, some israeli genes, blonde hair, and looks quite child-like, even in her twenties.

      The most obvious famous attractive blonde israeli female I can think of is Scarlett Johansson. (Her natural hair colour is a bit darker than how she has it, but I think it's still blonde.)

      So "Scarlett Johansson if she lost two stone" is the first approximation I guess. Wonder if AI would draw that?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymouṡ

      >young Pamela Anderson
      She's very thin, borderline anorexic, in Stella Maris. Perhaps not quite as bad before that but still thin, I think.

      "Thin" isn't the word that springs to mind when I think of Pamela Anderson.

      We're not told much about her appearance. She's very beautiful, some israeli genes, blonde hair, and looks quite child-like, even in her twenties.

      The most obvious famous attractive blonde israeli female I can think of is Scarlett Johansson. (Her natural hair colour is a bit darker than how she has it, but I think it's still blonde.)

      So "Scarlett Johansson if she lost two stone" is the first approximation I guess. Wonder if AI would draw that?

      I tried Bing with "thin blonde israeli beautiful waif" and got <pic attached>. Not bad, but she needs to be a bit thinner. I tried "anorexic" and it said that was a Bad Thing to ask for. "Very thin" didn't do anything much.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      like alison brie

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Passenger is very good minus the sister parts, Stella Maris is ok as a companion piece but it's just him wanting to talk about math and shit but the ending was pretty emotional no homo

  17. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Stella Maris is decent, it at least doesn't assume that the reader is a numbnut who couldn't manage a basic education. The Passenger is almost as tedious as any oldfic.

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