Orthodogs, are you okay?

Orthodogs, are you okay?

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >noooo you can't just literally believe something. you have to only pretend to. especially in current year!

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I actually have no problem with that. My problem with the LARPodox is their theology and their shitty attitudes.

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    If the blood of christ is spilled on the floor, i might actually cry

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Why do they treat the blood of their messiah as something holy instead of grape juice in a plastic presealed cup?

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    That's Jesus, you can't just mop it and forget about it. In case of emergency like an earthquake or some shit, the priest is also obliged to consoom the Christ chalice in it's entirety.

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    bump

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      K?

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Tell me you don't believe it's truly the immaculate Body and precious Blood of Christ without telling me you don't believe it's truly the immaculate Body and precious Blood of Christ.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Ok cannibal

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >In his first public controversy in 1522, he attacked the custom of fasting during Lent
        Lol, as if papist fasting isn't lax enough already. What a pussy.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Literal pagans back in the 2nd century used to slander christians as being cannibalists, with this being a big enough rumor that christian apologetics like St Athenagoras of Athens in his Plea for Christians towards Marcus Aurelius and Commodus spoke against this claim and others of atheism and immorality.

        • 2 months ago
          Dirk

          Lending support to a reformed view of the sacrament, not entailing the eating of Jesus carnally. If athenagoras thought he was substantially consuming the flesh of Christ he wouldn't have protested.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            …If they were accused of cannibalism it lends support for the traditional view

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            It doesn't matter what ignorant pagans accused them of, it matters what they themselves said.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            St Justin Martyr and St Irenaeus, his contemporaries, speak literally of it.
            >For not as common bread and common drink do we receive these; but in like manner as Jesus Christ our Savior, having been made flesh by the word of God, had both flesh and blood for our salvation, so likewise have we been taught that the food which is blessed by the prayer of his word, and from which our blood and flesh by transmutation are nourished, is the flesh and blood of that Jesus who was made flesh. For the apostles, in the memoirs composed by them, which are called Gospels, have thus delivered unto us what was enjoined upon them; that Jesus took bread, and when he had given thanks, said, “This do in remembrance of me, this is my body”; and that, after the same manner, having taken the cup and given thanks, he said, “This is my blood”; and gave it to them alone (First Apology, 66).
            >If the Lord were from other than the Father, how could he rightly take bread, which is of the same creation as our own, and confess it to be his body and affirm that the mixture in the cup is his blood? (Against Heresies 4:33.2).He has declared the cup, a part of creation, to be his own blood, from which he causes our blood to flow; and the bread, a part of creation, he has established as his own body, from which he gives increase unto our bodies. When, therefore, the mixed cup [wine and water] and the baked bread receive the word of God and becomes the Eucharist, the body of Christ, and from these the substance of our flesh is increased and supported, how can they say that the flesh is not capable of receiving the gift of God, which is eternal life—flesh which is nourished by the body and blood of the Lord, and is in fact a member of him?”
            St Athenagoras only says regarding cannibalism“….you cannot eat human flesh unless you have killed someone.” and christians abhor abortions and gladiator battles

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            https://www.earlychristianwritings.com/text/athenagoras-plea.html
            St Athenagoras on Cannibalism:
            >What man of sound mind, therefore, will affirm, while such is our character, that we are murderers? For we cannot eat human flesh till we have killed some one. The former charge, therefore, being false, if any one should ask them in regard to the second, whether they have seen what they assert, not one of them would be so barefaced as to say that he had. And yet we have slaves, some more and some fewer, by whom we could not help being seen; but even of these, not one has been found to invent even such things against us. For when they know that we cannot endure even to see a man put to death, though justly; who of them can accuse us of murder or cannibalism? Who does not reckon among the things of greatest interest the contests of gladiators and wild beasts, especially those which are given by you? But we, deeming that to see a man put to death is much the same as killing him, have abjured such spectacles. How, then, when we do not even look on, lest we should contract guilt and pollution, can we put people to death? And when we say that those women who use drugs to bring on abortion commit murder, and will have to give an account to God s for the abortion, on what principle should we commit murder? For it does not belong to the same person to regard the very foetus in the womb as a created being, and therefore an object of God's care, and when it has passed into life, to kill it; and not to expose an infant, because those who expose them are chargeable with child-murder, and on the other hand, when it has been reared to destroy it. But we are in all things always alike and the same, submitting ourselves to reason, and not ruling over it.
            He doesn't even speak about the eucharist, along with his reasoning being that you can only be a cannibal if you kill someone for their body.

          • 2 months ago
            Dirk

            What part of this is to be read as carnal rather than spiritual presence?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            “the food which is blessed by the prayer of his word, and from which our blood and flesh by transmutation are nourished, is the flesh and blood of that Jesus”

          • 2 months ago
            Dirk

            This doesn't prove your point
            In what sense is it the flesh and blood of Jesus? How do you know from context? Answer, this passage doesn't address the question.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            > In what sense is it the flesh and blood of Jesus?
            He says it’s the flesh and blood of Jesus. The Bible also does. Why ask this question? Just accept it on faith and shut it

          • 2 months ago
            Dirk

            >x is untrue. y is true. This source proves it.
            >that source doesn't prove y or disprove x
            >why are you asking x or y?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            What does transmutation mean in this case?

          • 2 months ago
            Dirk

            You tell me, I didn't bring it up

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Refers to the process of transformation or conversion of one substance into another. The quote is discussing a change where the food, blessed by prayer, is believed to be transformed into the flesh and blood of Jesus. The term emphasizes the profound and miraculous change believed to occur by Justin Martyr

          • 2 months ago
            Dirk

            >one substance into another
            Citation?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            The etymology of the word "transmutation". It comes from Latin "trans-" meaning "across, beyond, or through," and "mutatio" meaning "change." So "transmutation" literally means to change from one state or form to another. It is used in various contexts, including alchemy, where it famously referred to the supposed conversion of base metals into gold, and in physics, where it describes the change of one element into another through nuclear reactions. The same word is what Justin Martyr in the 2nd century uses to describe the Eucharist

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >What part of this is to be read as carnal rather than spiritual presence?
            Wine --> Blood
            Bread --> Flesh
            They describe it as being his body and blood of the incarnate Logos, with St Justin Martyr comparing it in a parallel with him becoming incarnate, along with saying it's not common bread and wine. It can't be a spiritual presence since God is present in everything as a Spirit, plus the parallel focuses on his incarnate body.

            “the food which is blessed by the prayer of his word, and from which our blood and flesh by transmutation are nourished, is the flesh and blood of that Jesus”

            Also, St Justin Martyr uses transmutation.

          • 2 months ago
            Dirk

            Because God is omnipresent... The spirit of God can't be present in any place in particular? Read Matt 18:20 again

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >The spirit of God can't be present in any place in particular? Read Matt 18:20 again
            God was always with St Moses before he manifested himself in the burning bush. Even so, the difference between him being one place and being in the eucharist becomes thin and the eucharist loses it's importance. Further, God is also present in every sacrament and liturgy more or less so by that logic just being in the church would be the same thing.

            >one substance into another
            Citation?

            Not him, but
            https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/transmutation
            >the act or process of changing something completely, especially into something different:
            This is a bit different with the eucharist or at least the catholics' view.
            >Catholicism, Eastern Orthodoxy, Oriental Orthodoxy, and the Church of the East teach that the reality (the "substance") of the elements of bread and wine is wholly changed into the body and blood of Jesus Christ, while the appearances (the "species") remain.
            >Transubstantiation ("change of the substance") is the term used by Catholics to denote what is changed, not to explain how the change occurs, since the Catholic Church teaches that "the signs of bread and wine become, in a way surpassing understanding, the Body and Blood of Christ".[74] The Orthodox use various terms such as transelementation, but no explanation is official as they prefer to leave it a mystery.
            https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eucharist

          • 2 months ago
            Dirk

            The etymology of the word "transmutation". It comes from Latin "trans-" meaning "across, beyond, or through," and "mutatio" meaning "change." So "transmutation" literally means to change from one state or form to another. It is used in various contexts, including alchemy, where it famously referred to the supposed conversion of base metals into gold, and in physics, where it describes the change of one element into another through nuclear reactions. The same word is what Justin Martyr in the 2nd century uses to describe the Eucharist

            So not "substance" yeah?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            > It is used in various contexts, including alchemy, where it famously referred to the supposed conversion of base metals into gold, and in physics, where it describes the change of one element into another through nuclear reactions
            In short, Justin Martyr's use of "transmutation" in describing the Eucharist aligns with the traditional view, which is to believe in a real transformation of the bread and wine into the body and blood of Christ.

          • 2 months ago
            Dirk

            Goalposts

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Your coping skills are incredible

            Why does he use the word "common"? Not as "common" bread and wine? Shouldn't he leave it unqualified if he believes it was transformed into flesh and blood?

            John 6:51
            51 I am the living bread which came down from heaven. If anyone eats of this bread, he will live forever; and the bread that I shall give is My flesh, which I shall give for the life of the world.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Ok, can you answer the question now?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            That scripture answered it…Jesus’ flesh is called bread, the bread of life. Not common bread

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >That scripture answered it
            I don't see anything about Justin Martyr here
            >Jesus’ flesh is called bread, the bread of life. Not common bread
            Do you believe the flesh of Jesus Christ is bread?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Not common bread

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Why does he use the word "common"? Not as "common" bread and wine? Shouldn't he leave it unqualified if he believes it was transformed into flesh and blood?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >So not "substance" yeah?
            That's what the catholic term Transubstantiation refers to.
            Not every word is going to be 100% the same as it's secular use (ex. Hypostasis in platonic and christisn philosophy).
            Also substance, or commonly "nature/essence", in christian theology refers to the what something is or whatness. By a change of substance, we are to understand something becoming another.

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Have you tried getting a life?

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >use a towel
    How else are you going to get rid of a stain on the floor?

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I legit thought I saw a crumb once on the floor. I quickly ate it before anyone could step on it. It was just a pearl of cotton that had likely fallen off someone’s clothes.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Could have been antidoron anyways, still not great but better than stepping on the body/blood of Christ. You should see the amount of blessed crumbs my toddlers generate...

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        True that. Still a far less humiliation than if I had been right.

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