Plymouth Plantation colony

Thanksgiving

Plymouth Plantation clothes:

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William Bradford reenactment:

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Plymouth Plantation :

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Mayflower Compact:

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William Bradford

https://blogs.loc.gov/law/2020/11/the-400th-anniversary-of-the-mayflower-compact/
https://www.history.com/news/mayflower-compact-colonial-america-plymouth
https://www.worldhistory.org/Mayflower_Compact/
https://plimoth.org/for-students/homework-help/mayflower-and-mayflower-compact

FULL TEXT OF POEM
https://poets.org/poem/courtship-miles-standish

https://pilgrimhall.org/pdf/Notes_Coles_Hill.pdf

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Beware Cat Shirt $21.68

Rise, Grind, Banana Find Shirt $21.68

Beware Cat Shirt $21.68

  1. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    The differences between JAMESTOWN vs PLYMOUTH

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  2. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    the name of God, Amen. We, whose names are underwritten, the loyal subjects of our dread Sovereigne Lord, King James, by the grace of God, of Great Britaine, France and Ireland king, defender of the faith, etc. having undertaken, for the glory of God, and advancement of the Christian faith, and honour of our king and country, a voyage to plant the first colony in the Northerne parts of Virginia, doe by these presents solemnly and mutually in the presence of God and one of another, covenant and combine ourselves together into a civill body politick, for our better ordering and preservation, and furtherance of the ends aforesaid; and by virtue hereof to enacte, constitute, and frame such just and equall laws, ordinances, acts, constitutions and offices, from time to time, as shall be thought most meete and convenient for the generall good of the Colonie unto which we promise all due submission and obedience. In witness whereof we have hereunder subscribed our names at Cape-Codd the 11. of November, in the year of the raigne of our sovereigne lord, King James, of England, France and Ireland, the eighteenth, and of Scotland the fiftie-fourth. Anno Dom. 1620.

    John Carver
    William Bradford
    Edward Winslow
    William Brewster
    Issac Allerton
    Myles Standish
    John Alden
    Samuel Fuller
    Christopher Martin
    William Mullins
    William White
    Richard Warren
    John Howland
    Stephen Hopkins
    Edward Tilley
    John Tilley
    Francis Cooke
    Thomas Rogers
    Thomas Tinker
    John Rigdale
    Edward Fuller
    John Turner
    Francis Eaton
    James Chilton
    John Crackston
    John Billington
    Moses Fletcher
    John Goodman
    Degory Priest
    Thomas Williams
    Gilbert Winslow
    Edmund Margeson
    Peter Browne
    Richard Britteridge
    George Soule
    Richard Clarke
    Richard Gardiner
    John Allerton
    Thomas English
    Edward Dotey
    Edward Leister

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Thomas Rogers
      I’m a descendant of this guy. Pretty cool.

      • 5 months ago
        Dirk

        My PGM brother

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        That's so amazing. Do you have anything to share...stories, artifacts, etc?

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          I don’t have anything too crazy. He’s on my paternal side and I traced him through some descendants of his that ended up founding a heavily Protestant town in Canada in the early 1800s.
          The guy has a Wikipedia page:
          https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Rogers_(Mayflower_passenger)
          He was a rich merchant that owned properties in London and Leyden, and helped fund the thing. He died in the first winter of 1620-21, but his son John, whom Im descended from, came over not long after.
          Based on some genealogical books I’ve found, his great grandfather Reverend John Rogers, who was a Protestant martyr burned at the stake in 1555. John’s grandfather was a Sergeant at Law in the 1400s who married into a junior branch of the de Courtenay family. His line claimed descent from the Norman Kings of Sicily and that de Courtenay line runs back to basically every single important Christian king you can think of—all the way back to Charlemagne through several lines of Frenchmen.

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            I am so jealous. I'm descended from Ireland :(. Are you Canadian ?

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            No, my family moved back to the US in the 20th century. Don’t feel too jealous btw. That’s just one line I found. If you do some research, you can probably find something very similar. Besides, I’m a 1/3 euromutt of poorer lineages from my mother’s side. The majority of my family were poorer but still decently well off Scotch Irish and Anglo-Welsh or Anglo Protestants.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Myles Standish

      I recall he was the only professional soldier they had, and according to his Wikipedia he never actually became a Separatist church member.

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        Yeah that's what I read, too. But having no records is not 100% proof.

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          It wouldn't make sense for him not to join the church, why would he have volunteered to go if he didn't at least sort of believe in Puritanism? IMO he probably did.

          • 5 months ago
            Dirk

            I agree, everyone in the settlement would have joined the parish at least nominally. I wouldn't say he would need to "believe in puritanism", because puritanism isn't (wasn't) a competing faith with the CoE, it's a more reformed/pure articulation of English spirituality. Like all non clergy he probably didn't get into the weeds of debate over the prayer book or vestments or other puritan issues. In fact being a layman is all the more reason to suppose he was a puritan sympathizer. Puritan sermons were pop culture, that's why so many of them were written down and exist to this day.
            Fun fact the current general minister of the united church of Christ is himself a mayflower descendant

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            >UCC general minister
            And of course here's the elephant in the room: how they became Unitarians (the UCC is basically just one step before UUism)

          • 5 months ago
            Dirk

            >became unitarians
            >one step before UU
            You're a bozo

            The UCC contains those congregationalist churches that did not become unitarians. Often, like in Plymouth, the unitarians won the parish so the orthodox trinitarians picked up and built a new, orthodox church.

            It's also idiotic to read this controversy back onto the pilgrims 200 years before

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            Isn't the 4C their true successor?

          • 5 months ago
            Dirk

            True? Untrue? It's arbitrary. They're all successors with organic connection to the early congregationalist movement. It's also no stretch to say the Baptist movement, which often cares about congregational polity even more, is a valid child of the congregationalist pilgrims. John Piper is an obvious puritan preacher who wrote his dissertation on Edwards but he's part of a historically swedish Baptist denomination. Joel Beeke is a walking puritan encyclopedia but his denomination is Dutch reformed.

            I don’t have anything too crazy. He’s on my paternal side and I traced him through some descendants of his that ended up founding a heavily Protestant town in Canada in the early 1800s.
            The guy has a Wikipedia page:
            https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Rogers_(Mayflower_passenger)
            He was a rich merchant that owned properties in London and Leyden, and helped fund the thing. He died in the first winter of 1620-21, but his son John, whom Im descended from, came over not long after.
            Based on some genealogical books I’ve found, his great grandfather Reverend John Rogers, who was a Protestant martyr burned at the stake in 1555. John’s grandfather was a Sergeant at Law in the 1400s who married into a junior branch of the de Courtenay family. His line claimed descent from the Norman Kings of Sicily and that de Courtenay line runs back to basically every single important Christian king you can think of—all the way back to Charlemagne through several lines of Frenchmen.

            Go sign the descendants book

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            >Go sign the descendants book
            I didn’t even know that was a thing. Where is it and how do I sign?

          • 5 months ago
            Dirk

            I've mixed it up, there's descendants books of particular families, especially those with existing houses like this one
            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jabez_Howland_House?wprov=sfla1

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

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          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            ?feature=shared

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            I read a long time ago an interesting passage that said while in church children would get hit with a stick by a guy walking around the pews (if they were acting up). I also read that they'd pray for legit 48 non stop hours every week.

          • 5 months ago
            Dirk
          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            Do you have more? Like videos and such? I can't find anything on my searches

          • 5 months ago
            Dirk

            Not really sorry

            Inspired by this thread I did a genealogical search and I'm only at nearest a 3rd cousin of certain mayflower passengers. I look up my wife and she's a direct descendent of three different mayflower families. I am so mad right now.

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            I have zero Mayflower ancestors descended from Irish potato peasants. So jealous of your wife

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            I agree. Then again, he was not their first choice. They originally almost asked James Smith.

  3. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    The art of this one event and people in time is vast. So much of the world changed from this one place- Plymouth.

    I could not find some of the art pieces but most of them are housed in Pilgrim Hall.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Just read some guy after finding out his wife committed adultery dropped his kids off on the Mayflower. The two died but oldest lived.

  4. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    It's amazing how many people died before one little colony of less than a 100 could grow to 7,000 in a hundred years. It's amazing what they accomplished.

  5. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Culminating to one day of Thsnksgiving and brotherly love and help from Squanto

  6. 5 months ago
    Anonymous
  7. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Governor Bradford of Massachusetts made this first Thanksgiving Proclamation three years after the Pilgrims settled at Plymouth:

    "Inasmuch as the great Father has given us this year an abundant harvest of Indian corn, wheat, peas, beans, squashes, and garden vegetables, and has made the forests to abound with game and the sea with fish and clams, and inasmuch as He has protected us from the ravages of the savages, has spared us from pestilence and disease, has granted us freedom to worship God according to the dictates of our own conscience.

    Now I, your magistrate, do proclaim that all ye Pilgrims, with your wives and ye little ones, do gather at ye meeting house, on ye hill, between the hours of 9 and 12 in the daytime, on Thursday, November 29th, of the year of our Lord one thousand six hundred and twenty three and the third year since ye Pilgrims landed on ye Pilgrim Rock, there to listen to ye pastor and render thanksgiving to ye Almighty God for all His blessings."

    William Bradford
    Ye Governor of Ye Colony

  8. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

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