Post the best book you've ever read.

Post the best book you've ever read.

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    idiot by dostoy

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Obligatory

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Is there anything in there about a village named Tijar where the people all rioted and went crazy, parading through the streets wasting/breaking things and so on? Tiqqun ascribed such an anecdote to the book, but I've actually flipped through one or two copies and not been able to find it quickly.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I don’t think so?

        Captcha: AMY42

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The Holy Bible
    The Republic

    Nothing else comes close.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      zzzzzzzzz

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Predictable. Those two books have filtered billions of men, and will continue to do so.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Literally two of the most popular books in history lol the Bible being the most popular

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Yes, and they've still filtered billions.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Neither of those books are literature

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            To pseuds, no. To every intelligent mind on the planet, of course they are. Just be silent, troony.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Nope, it's scripture

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            It is fully both.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Cringe

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous
  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I can't pick one, but I can pick two, so it's either
    >Rousseau's Confessions
    Or
    >Goethe's Faust in both parts

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Paradise Lost
    Meditations

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The Gospel of John

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Home Body by Rupi Kaur

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Must be the only book you've ever read.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    This as well as the sequel.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Gosh dern'it! Conflagration! Member doz days when'err we're shootin' dem fellers? I's miss dems...

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It's between this and The Temptation of Saint Anthony.

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Hard to pick a single one. What is the metric?
    >the book that you enjoyed most thoroughly while reading it
    Either The Brothers Karamazov or The Count of Monte Cristo or Sometimes a Great Notion
    >the book that "landed" the heaviest
    Probably The Elementary Particles, Serotonin, or crime and Punishment
    >the book that inspired you to write and think the most
    Love, Poverty, and War by Hitch
    The Call of the Wild by London
    Lives of Girls and Women by Munro
    Rabbit Run
    >the most artful, intellectual, or subtle masterpiece you've read
    The Map and the Territory
    Crime and Punishment
    Raise High the Roofbeam, Carpenters
    Dead Souls
    The Collected Stories of Nikolai Gogol
    Notes from Underground
    The Elementary Particles

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      lmao i had the same taste as you when i was like 16... i guess going on IQfy cna be good for expanding your intellectual horizons.
      hitchens is a homosexual though

      not sure if i have a favourite book... Yeats collected plays, yeats collected poems, dowson collected poems, russell history of western philosophy, lady chatley by dh lawrence, journey to the end of the night, the golem, the magic mountain, the art of memory, they're a basically random list of pretty good ones, but i dont think i could pick one favourite...

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >Yeats
        I hope you're not a Christian. Yeats will break your heart in the end.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >Yeats will break your heart in the end.
          What do you mean by this? I've been noticing all these little warnings throughout his work lately, where he tells you not to look too long or too deeply into the vision he discloses...
          >If any should look on our rushing band
          >we come between him and the deed of his hand
          >we come between him and the hope of his heart

          >there is no truth
          >saving in thine own heart....
          >then later in the same poem he tells you not to hunger fiercely after truth

          >We should be dazed and terror-struck,
          >If we but saw in dreams that room,
          >Those wine-drenched eyes, and curse our luck
          >That emptied all our days to come.

          I love yeats so much man... and no i'm not a christian.

          Lotta pseuds proving they haven't read Moby Dick or Ulysses since no one is posting either and they're the indisputable heavyweights of best books ever

          Can you explain to me why ulysses is so full of mean spirited gossip? Lady gregory is a spiteful old harridan, ae smells bad and kisses william blake's ass all day, bloom is a femboy who likes getting stomped on by dominatrixes .etc.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Lol, if the Yeats thread is yours, you and I are already in conversation. I'm your only poster in that thread. Since you're not a Christian (told ya, ya jabroney

            I guarantee he is a Christian. That you are too is both incidental and inevitable. No one who gives a shit about literature, history, or politics dislikes Hitchens except for the two reasons I named. No exceptions.

            ), he may break your heart in a different way. Maybe yours will grow as weary as his did. He broke mine by ultimately frustrating his own lifelong search for spiritual things and Truth, by ultimately rejecting Christ, and in so doing, rejecting all spiritual things because, for Him, Christianity was the last option. I think he held for awhile to shallow hopes of some Blakean unity of religion, but as those are all nonsense, he saw through it, but he couldn't bring himself to genuine faith, and died a weary hearted man. So far as I can tell from his many works I've read, read, and reread. Save in that final turning away, Yeats was my preconcepted twin. I mourn his passing (if it passed as it seems to have).

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Based on you calling Hitch a gaygor in response to someone recommending Love, Poverty, and War, ai can say with some confidence that you're triggered/mindbroken/butthurt over.one of the following two things:
        -his support for the second Gulf war
        -his hatred for Christianity
        I will bet a lot of money that it's the second one, and I will bet even more money that you haven't read Love, Poverty, and War. You just hate atheists and atheism.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          To guess he's a Christian with the list of authors he wrote...odd choice.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I guarantee it. No one who enjoys literature and writing hates Hitchens for any other reason than the two I named.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Pseud post. Way to prove only midwits like Hitchens.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Are you willing to denounce Christ, our Lord and Saviour, with timestamp to prove me wrong?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I never said I wasn't a Christian. I am one. I said I doubt he is. His list of authors are nearly entirely opponents of Christianity.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I guarantee he is a Christian. That you are too is both incidental and inevitable. No one who gives a shit about literature, history, or politics dislikes Hitchens except for the two reasons I named. No exceptions.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            And that you believe that nonsense is what outs you as a pseud.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            No. It's from many dozens of Hitch threads over 12+ years, thousands of unique posters, ZERO exceptions to the rule. So help me understand: where are all these non-Christian, non-Muslim, non-anti-Iraq war posters who recognize and acknowledge Hitchens's excellent contributions to political, social, historical, and literary commentary/criticism?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Who fail* to recognize and acknowledge you mean. Oh, they exist. But obviously there's none to point you to as we're speaking in a sparsely inhabited thread which you seem to have forgotten. Anyway, I don't care about your fanboying. It is inconsequential to me. Even more so now, as you've made it perfectly clear you're more of an emotional man than a rational one.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          To guess he's a Christian with the list of authors he wrote...odd choice.

          I guarantee it. No one who enjoys literature and writing hates Hitchens for any other reason than the two I named.

          No I'm not a Christian, I just think Hitchens was a stupid homosexual. If he was born 20 years later he would have been an eceleb owning the libs on college campuses. He was a polemicist and an entertainer, and he constantly gets the facts wrong in his angry rants against christianity. In one of his debates he even confused the vulgate and the king james bible lmao. When hitchens does try and address serious topics his arguments are confused and equivocal, and his dilletantism is obvious after you do a few hours research into the topic. (like his fumbling over david irvings trial and reputation, for example)

          Try Russell, in particular his History of Western Philosophy, if you want some interesting and thoughtful secular humanist writing. Most of Hitchens' interesting points are just plagarized from Russell anyway.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Why do you care about his rants against Christianity? I'm talking about his essays on history, literature, and politics, specifically the collection Love, Poverty, and War.
            Are you willing to denounce the Lord Jesus Christ?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >gets fully roasted
            >doubles down
            Peak midwittery.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I have been shilling Hitchens's essay collections for like six years, always telling people to ignore his cheap anti-religious stuff. But I learned that people CANNOT ignore his cheap anti-religious stuff. They just can't because they are unwilling to explore the work of an atheist who's hostile to their religion. That is where this comes from.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >liking Houellebecq
      I remember being 20

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        You're pretty cool.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      If you are alluding to Dostoevsky’s worst novels, then, indeed, I dislike intensely The Brothers Karamazov and the ghastly Crime and Punishment rigamarole. No, I do not object to soul-searching and self-revelation, but in those books the soul, and the sins, and the sentimentality, and the journalese, hardly warrant the tedious and muddled search. Dostoyevsky’s lack of taste, his monotonous dealings with persons suffering with pre-Freudian complexes, the way he has of wallowing in the tragic misadventures of human dignity – all this is difficult to admire. I do not like this trick his characters have of ”sinning their way to Jesus” or, as a Russian author, Ivan Bunin, put it more bluntly, ”spilling Jesus all over the place." Crime and Punishment’s plot did not seem as incredibly banal in 1866 when the book was written as it does now when noble prostitutes are apt to be received a little cynically by experienced readers. Dostoyevsky never really got over the influence which the European mystery novel and the sentimental novel made upon him. The sentimental influence implied that kind of conflict he liked—placing virtuous people in pathetic situations and then extracting from these situations the last ounce of pathos. Non-Russian readers do not realize two things: that not all Russians love Dostoevsky as much as Americans do, and that most of those Russians who do, venerate him as a mystic and not as an artist. He was a prophet, a claptrap journalist and a slapdash comedian. I admit that some of his scenes, some of his tremendous farcical rows are extraordinarily amusing. But his sensitive murderers and soulful prostitutes are not to be endured for one moment—by this reader anyway. Dostoyevsky seems to have been chosen by the destiny of Russian letters to become Russia’s greatest playwright, but he took the wrong turning and wrote novels.

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    as i lay dying

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The Whale

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous
    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      This isn’t just a bunch of seething about my country is it?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        It’s Kafka, so I’d guess he’s praising the HUSTLE and BUSTLE of early 20th America’s progressive and negrified culture.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          no, it's the opposite.

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Definitely this, modern day travel writers wouldn't dare deliberately use anachronistic King James era English unironically or even ironically

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Lotta pseuds proving they haven't read Moby Dick or Ulysses since no one is posting either and they're the indisputable heavyweights of best books ever

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I don't care about homosexual Sea Journeys nor Pervert Town Antics, sorry.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Moby Dick is so incredibly autistic that half the book can be summed up as "They were on a boat".

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Filtered

  17. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Best book I’ve ever read has got to be this post from IQfy

  18. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    A Canticle for Leibowitz

  19. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    https://t.me/intelslava/58555

    Russian White wienerroach kill them all

  20. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    On the Road influenced my life more than any other book.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      How so?

  21. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    probably either infinite jest or anna karenina which i read back to back my senior year of high school

  22. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Also sprach Zarathustra

  23. 1 month ago
    Anonymous
    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >duuuuuude I’m going CRAYYYYZEEEY the book

  24. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Walden by Henry David Thoreau

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >this homie planting beans, measuring pounds and watching ants battling

  25. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I'm not very well read, but I'm trying as of recent. Were this the best fiction I've ever read thread, Hamlet wins, but I really enjoyed this.
    I've started Dostoevsky's The Idiot for something a bit more serious thoughbeit

  26. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Grapes of Wrath

  27. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Fictions - Jorge Luis Borges
    Ka - Roberto Calasso

  28. 1 month ago
    Anonymous
    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Can you elaborate why you like it so much? I was planning on reading it.

  29. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >the mathematical ordering of the chapters
    >the fact that you can read the chapters in reverse order and it still makes sense because the real "ending" is the central chapter
    >kinoest type of existentialism

    it's too good

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I got filtered by this book. I need to read it again.

  30. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    In terms of sheer prose, the King James Bible leads the pack.

    In terms of impact, The Power of Awareness, by Neville Goddard. Not so much for its content, as for the fact that it's content leads to new angles on Christianity, on Advaita, on Vedanta, on German Idealism, on consciousness and meditation. It's a bomb, and it blew up everything I thought I knew about everything.

  31. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I'm writing it.

  32. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Gravity’s Rainbow but I never finished it and didn’t understand it

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