R u archiving everything?

R u archiving everything?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I wonder what the venn diagram between privacytards and archivetards looks like, my guess would be that it's a full circle.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I'm a privacytard but I only archive some occasional stuff since I got aware of how much textual porn from my childhood got lost.
      All those texts and I only have memories to jerk off to.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      There are literal wikileaks being covered up and memory holed because the west are literally committing the largest genocide of all time.

      You deserve the rope.
      Then again, you give us no quarter so it makes sense I give you none.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >the west are literally committing the largest genocide of all time
        This. Russians are being wiped off the planet by NATO forces as we speak and no one is talking about it.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I did a brief search, through my usual schizo pages, and I couldn't find anything about it, or maybe I missed it. I do know that corporate media and NATO itself are pretty much in lockstep: Russia is genociding Ukrainians. It's a human rights crisis, and intervention is necessary, because [Alucard quote].
          The whole thing makes me sick, and the worst part isn't the fact that people are lapping it up and cheering for Armageddon, it's that I would have been one of them, once upon a time.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    paper may last longer, but how much information was ever printed at all?
    stuff deemed not important enough to make it to paper was simply never recorded, there was no historical equivalent to a geocities page about someone's cat

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      There is an inherent difference between digital information and physical renditions like books. The cost of keeping information in a book is almost zero after it's printed, while keeping digital information online is not. Serving a webpage requires active maintenance of systems, and a domain name which is a subscription. Unless you're serving static web pages then there's the cost of keeping bad actors (IQfy hackers) from your website which is also an ongoing expense.
      Keeping a book in a physical library requires orders of magnitude less effort than keeping an Internet website online.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        the cost of keeping data in a book before it is printed means most things aren't ever printed, moronic homosexual

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        You don’t need to host a web page to maintain digital information. You can throw it on a USB and lock it in a vault, exactly like you would a book. You’re not making a fair comparison.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Flash memory loses charge with time thus an unused USB stick will degrade and destroy the data. You can't even use mainstream SSDs as cold storage because the electrons keeping the information dissipate due to leakage. Every modern SSD is constantly regenerating the charges in cells because of degradation. That's why even if you don't write to it it will lose endurance if it's powered on, if it's not powered on then you will lose data instead.
          In order to keep the information secure you need to be sure the method used to preserve it has a long life span. No modern mainstream digital record method has that property. That's why there's an entire industry for it. And it's expensive, very expensive.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            The cost of keeping a usb charged is about the same as keeping a book from rotting from moisture. Plus there’s magnetic hard drives, DVDs, magnetic tape. Books might still win out, but digital isn’t as hard to keep as you’re making out, you don’t need a server. And as the other anon said, you can create more frivolous material digitally than you can with printing.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >The cost of keeping a usb charged is about the same as keeping a book from rotting from moisture.
            A powered low cost device like USB stick will degrade with time, just like any other electronic device. Keeping a book from moisture can be achieved passively, otherwise we wouldn't have had books that lasted 2000+ years. You know... far before we had electricity.
            >Plus there’s magnetic hard drives,
            Magnetic charge isn't permanent and degrades with time. It's a very precise piece of mechanics thus is delicate. Most modern HDDs don't survive 10 years.
            >DVDs
            Dyes degrade, look up disc rot. There are archival-grade discs but as I wrote before - they are very expensive.
            >magnetic tape.
            Magnetic charge isn't permanent, the tape itself can degrade. It's way more resilient than HDDs tho. Drives are ridiculously expensive.
            >Books might still win out, but digital isn’t as hard to keep as you’re making out, you don’t need a server.
            OP's about websites disappearing off the Internet so pretty sure you do need a server to keep them online.
            >And as the other anon said, you can create more frivolous material digitally than you can with printing
            Sure, but if we go that far one could argue that you can print the representation of that.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Archive disks arent expensive

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >no modern mainstream digital record method has that property
            CDs can last 200 years.
            But the CD dreaders will die long before that

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            i doubt any cd-r's can last that long, not without being sealed and stored in a dark, dry, cool environment at least... even then idk if the dyes are that stable
            there's a big difference between a pressed cd and a recordable cd
            that said, things like mdisc recordables and other dvd/bluray recordables with inorganic dyes probably could last that long if stored well
            that said, the lifespan of media is only important when the data in question is intended to be able to survive being unmaintained for generations. the nice thing about digital copies is that they can be done losslessly, like imagine if digital storage never existed, and we only had analog transfers to make copies with, every time you make a copy of analog media, the copy is slightly worse than the source, it's unavoidable, imagine if say, 70's music, instead of being digitised in or just after the 70's, the copies you heard today were analog copies of analog copies of analog copies, over time it will become worse and worse
            just look at the well-known sailor moon example, each transfer over the years has had worse colour than the last because the original film is degrading, we didn't have the technology early on to make an extremely high quality HD digital scan of it, so some information has been irreversibly lost to time

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            is that really due to degradation? doesn't really look like anything that couldn't be corrected with adjusting the color balances

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            yes, it's the film degrading over time. without any context you may think it was just a poorly made transfer, but this is far from the only example
            and yes, these could be corrected to recover most of what it should look like at this point, but eventually that won't be the case, the film will get worse and worse until we're left only with the best digital scan as the best copy in existence, and that will never degrade with further copies (at least it doesn't have to, lossy encodes are another can of worms which aren't really the fault of digital as a concept)
            https://unwritten-record.blogs.archives.gov/2016/01/11/film-preservation-101-why-are-old-films-sometimes-pink/

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        there's pros and cons, for example duplicating digital data has no cost compared to a book, like i can see a page with information i like and hit save, burn it to a cd, shit i can print it onto paper
        see a book i like? sure i can scan it, but that's a lot more work than copying a file

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >there's pros and cons, for example duplicating digital data has no cost compared to a book
          It does have a cost. You need a system to read the source, you need a system to write the copy, and you need a medium to keep the copy. Usually the cost is negligible, but it's not always the case. Try finding a working system to duplicate an 8" floppy. Now try to find a system to even read it in 50 years.
          >like i can see a page with information i like and hit save, burn it to a cd, shit i can print it onto paper
          All of that has a cost. Most people don't even have a disc burner/reader anymore nor do they have printers. You're giving examples of having to use specialized hardware to achieve your goals, all of which is relatively expensive.
          >see a book i like? sure i can scan it, but that's a lot more work than copying a file
          Of course, but we're talking about keeping the information online vs. keeping a book existing. Both of which are about preserving the information in question.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            yes, with digital information you tend to need to upgrade them to new media, both for physical media life reasons and for media obsolescence reasons
            on the plus side, over time the cost of storing data drops over time, like for example think about the cost of storing 100MiB of data in the 80's compared to now, even just personally when i upgrade my storage the old storage basically just gets backed up and put in a small corner of the new storage since it's always much larger
            the best thing about digital information is that it's much easier to produce many copies, not a lot of printed material gets that luxury
            as for devil's advocate, i understand your view, just because it's digital doesn't mean it can't be lost, but no matter what you're keeping, there's always a maintenance cost, even if it's just providing a physically secure location away from weather effects/moisture/heat/bugs/etc. nothing is free. store a bare book in a forest and see how long it lasts

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I never said that keeping printed material is free. I argued that keeping digital information isn't free as some in this thread believe.
            The difference in cost depends on usage. The reason websites disappear is because keeping them online isn't free.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            i don't think anyone who knows anything about this genuinely thinks websites stay online forever
            yes, i'm aware there's a saying that's something like "what is put online stays online forever", but that's not intended to be interpreted so generally and literally, it's more about information that is desired, and not because the original source will always be there, but because information is so easily duplicated that the data will be shared around "forever" (re: for as long as anyone cares to do so)

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            and morons who complain about this are the ones who aren't willing to share anything

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        books take up lots of space physically, where are you going to store them?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          bytes take up lots of space physically, where are you going to store them?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            one book of relevant text is like few megabytes at most, few terabyte HDD fits in my pocket

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I got my name written on a grain of rice at the county fair
            that dude could probably fit war and peace on a booklet the size of a thumb drive

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            excellent that solves the problem then!

            let's hire that guy to record all of humanity's history and culture

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        The only information of value to humanity are philosophers and engineering books, everything else are little works of art. Wew lad.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >The cost of keeping information in a book is almost zero after it's printed
        Where are you gonna store it? Also bear in mind that books aren't resilient to environmental damage so if you don't store them properly they'll degrade. Recently in my country there was some repository of old handwritten books that didn't get digitized and got lost in a fire, turns out paper is very fire friendly.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      the quality has gone down significantly
      most of the crap (including this post) these days is not worth preserving long term

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        that's my point, you have to weigh up the fact that more information is being lost against the fact that more information is being recorded in the first place
        nobody in the 19th century was taking photos of what they have for breakfast every morning, they had photos taken for much more important reasons, making the photos more valuable (even if still only to themselves)

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >there was no historical equivalent to a geocities page about someone's cat
      But just imagine for a second if there was. Would you just throw it away too?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        if there was a record of a person's cat from 1,000 years ago, it would be interesting
        if there was a record of 1,000,000 people's cats from 1,000 years ago, one of them wouldn't be nearly as interesting
        we only treat ancient information as valuable because there's little of it and we want to know more about it. if we had too much, then finding new information wouldn't be nearly as interesting

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >there was no historical equivalent to a geocities page about someone's cat
      arimasuyo

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >the oddly specific descriptions of the cat's qualities
        >that near worship of the cat
        This reads like a synthesis of Lovecraft and justinrpg.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I have a literal bag of lyrics, poems and music that I've made over decades.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    all content published on the internet since 2013 is garbage anyway

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Yes, in my head.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Yes.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      award

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Anon, there are ancient tablets written in cuneiform that are grocery lists. Some dude in Mesopotamia recorded what he ate for breakfast.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      888888888888

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    i have 200GB of science/engineering/math books , I have them on 4 different HD, if anything gets overjewed and censored to the point where you cant find it I'll be able to share it with the world.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      at that point books about farming, keeping cattle etc. would be much more valuable

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      AI will scan your thoughts and memories and if it finds illegal knowledge, it will be deleted.
      When you have the brain implant, that is done automatically and you don't even know.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    put me in the archive!

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    but I have adhd and need a text-to-speech ext
    I need the innernet

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Your kindergarten school work papers have been in the trash for a long time and nobody, not even you, is ever going to miss how you counted to a hundred and could write the alphabet.
    38% of what exactly is "no longer accessible"
    There are some things like old games that "you miss a lot" but you're never going to play those again except maybe once as a nostalgia trip.

    >it's just gone unlike paper!
    Again, there's a tonne of wasted paper you made that you don't even remember the contents of.
    So fricking what.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I literally burned everything I wrote down in school because that's how useful it is in real life.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Isn't copying your data to new drives every 2-3 years the best way to maintain your data?

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >implying 38% of those webpages had any meaningful information
    >implying we don't have overwhelming amount of information sources now
    Shit thread.

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I have enough YT videos, movies, TV shows, documentaries, porn, comics, ebooks, roms, games, music and misc to last till I die. Stopped counting at 70tb.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      How do you store all that?

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I'm pretty sure that >38% of all written text gets destroyed over a decade if you include people's diaries and school assignments and shit

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    False equivocation. People's blogs are not "mankind's knowledge". You can't even make this claim for most research papers nowadays.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I bet archive autists think they are morally superior cause they have 100 harddrives full of CP and Dickbutt memes. I'll be laughing my head off when their house is raided (and offsite backups) after they die and all of their harddrives are destroyed lololol

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Only the prettiest asmr girls.

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    If you can store and have an internet connection you can host an exact mirror of the site with ipfs, that anybody else could also locally host. If literally none of the sites users or admins could be fricked to use IA or ipfs then the site was worthless shit

  17. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Speaking of archiving, has anyone undertood CDX index files by any chance?
    I understand how WARC files basicly are a dump of all HTTP data and a bit more.
    To find a specific HTTP response I need a index, so I stumpled across CDX files.
    https://www.loc.gov/preservation/digital/formats/fdd/fdd000590.shtml

    But they are basicly just a minified list? Isn‘t that totally ineffective at scale or have I missed something?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      read the section
      >Relationship to other formats

  18. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Fricking morons, we already solved this problem. Any useful information has already been fed into an llm.

  19. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I find it comforting to know that the internet is not forever.

  20. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >instances of webpages == knowledge
    moron
    the web has become more consolidated

  21. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Have we solved long term digital data storage yet?

    Here are the specs:
    >long term (at least thousands of years)
    >robust (does not degrade or lose any data during lifespan and is immune to electromagnetic interference and can be handled roughly)
    >does not require active power or maintenance to retain the data
    >can be written to at least once and read multiple times during the lifespan
    >preferably high density
    >preferably fast
    >preferably cheap

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      rocks arranged in a matrix

  22. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tape_drive

  23. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    That's why the continued existence of the Wayback Machine must be ensured.

  24. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Save
    Absolutely
    Everything
    While
    You
    Still
    Able

  25. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    this is why i down loaded all of wikipedia a few years back. That AI untainted version, will be illegal, and super valuable.

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