Recommend me some Brazilian novels in English?

Recommend me some Brazilian novels in English IQfy. What holds up best in translation?

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  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Bumping because I also want to read some 'zilian IQfy.

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Anything by pic related

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Any suggestions where I should start?

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous
    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      "Terras do sem fim" by Jorge Amado.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      The only ones I've read from the chart are Guimarães Rosa, Lispector and de Assis. the GR books I read in spanish translations with the original portuguese texts alongside (pic semi-related, the rest of my spanish/portuguese copies are in rubbermaid tubs in the garage). My first language is spanish and I was studying portuguese at the time, so I felt I had a good understanding of the language and neologisms of the author. Lispector and de Assis I read in the standard english translations found in trade paperbacks today (New Directions for Lispector, FSG for de Assis) and found them to be serviceable. Lispector is an odd bird: I had access to the portuguese originals back at university when I was reading her, but her language is so clear and limpid that a lot of the meaning comes from the cumulative effect, and the english translations were perfectly apt to capture that effect.

      https://i.imgur.com/31tbRVM.jpeg

      Anything by pic related

      That better than food guy cliff brought her to my attention but I still haven't read her.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Since your first language is spanish (and, especially since you understand portuguese) you certainly might understand GR.
        How did you like it?
        Also, their style are polar opposites, but I just couldn't recommend Graciliano Ramos enough.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I was admittedly a plot-gay back in my university days, so I read it mainly for the plot and themes (epic quest, vivid descriptions of battles, philosophical musings on life and death, deals with the devil, forbidden/tragic love). What I found was on par with the greatest books (think Don Quixote, Moby Dick, Canterbury Tales, Dante's Commedia, Ulysses, hell even Gravity's Rainbow for how off the wall some of the situations and ironies can get), and it really made me appreciate how a book can transcend the narrative to become something more meaningful than the sum of its parts. I hadn't read them at the time, but it made me appreciate Thomas Bernhard and Patrick White when I came to read them years later, and I thought it was a step above many of the other LatAm writers I was reading at the time (García Márquez, Vargas Llosa, Fuentes, Cabrera Infante, Cortázar, but not Rulfo, Donoso, Lezama Lima, Felisberto Hernández or Onetti). I haven't reread his stuff (or many of the others) since then, it's been almost a decade, but whenever I do think about those books I think I should.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I'm glad you liked it and will take your recommendations of LatAm authors (never read Onetti and Donoso, even though I've heard about them).

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Any work of Guimarães Rosa conceived from "Sagarana" and onwards will, somewhat, get lost in translation. That includes "Grande Sertão", the first mention in the pic and his magnum opus. Also, it's much more dense than Sagarana.

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I'm Brazilian. The only Brazilian fiction writers I really like are Jose de Alencar and Machado de Assis.
    That said, we have good translations of foreign books. Our best translators of Tolstoy, Dostoevsky and Homer are really good. IMO, the best Brazilian Homer translator is far better than the best Portuguese one.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Why is that?

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Don't know about translations, but I would recommend:
    >Machado
    >Lima Barreto
    >Graciliano Ramos
    >Manuel Antônio de Almeida
    >João Guimarães Rosa
    >Gustavo Corção
    >José Geraldo de Vieira
    >Octávio de Faria
    Imo José de Alencar, Jorge Amado and Aluísio Azevedo sucks but you can try it if you want

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I'll give some a try, thanks!

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      recommend some brazilian writers for a guy that loves faulkner, gaddis, joyce.
      i'm a brazilian but have only read guimarães rosa lmao

      where do I start

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Clarice is closest to the writers you mentioned
        I also found Raul Pompeia's O Ateneu to be close in themes and style to Joyce's Portrait, and honestly preffered it to the latter
        Machado rings very close to the prose of european XIXth century novelists, but I love his characteristic humor, and the old Rio setting of his works
        Lima Barreto is terrific as well, and very political, but might be not what you're after
        >have only read guimarães rosa
        how did you enjoy him?
        I'm currently reading Grande Sertão Veredas, and it's probably the greatest thing I've ever read in my life
        although I can't imagine recommending it to a foreigner as a starter BR lit
        It's incredibly difficult to read, and most of it is probably lost in translation

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I said I only read Rosa, but I also read the three most famous of Assis' novels.
          I found them a bit boring, romance/realism isn't really my thing. My favorite from him is definitely Posthumous Memoirs, I enjoyed it a lot.
          Also read Euclides' Os Sertões, which is an epic book in every single aspect: the scope of it, the battle itself, the writing. But of course, not close to any of the previously mentioned writers.
          About Veredas, I thought it was fantastic, on par with some of the greatest writers of the period.
          Making a ridiculous analogy it's like a mix of joyce with mccarthy, but of course it's such a great work it's unfair to compare him to any other writer, it's a very unique book.
          And yeah, it's tough recommending it to foreigners, but at the same time Rosa himself helped with some translations and was happy with the result iirc.

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Murilo Rubião is a personal favorite, and one that I was recommended on a br thread here on lit
    he only ever wrote short stories, and his entire work ammounts to no more than 200 pages, but it's beautiful and incredibly worth it
    never read anything like it

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Careful with translation. My mind is reminding that English translation of one these Brazilian classics was sanitized to be politically correct to burger standards. I just can't remember which one.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Yeah that's fair. Unfortunately I cannot read Portugese so English is all I can do.

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I worry that all works to greater or lesser extent get lost in translation. I am forever to only appreciate classics written in English I suppose.

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