Refrigeration

I'm starting an HVAC AAS program after a brainlet BS in Business Administration. This is from what I can tell a basic diagram of the refrigeration cycle, knowing this I need to try and understand more about how this works with various real world examples. My textbook (Modern Refrigeration and Air Conditioning) is very broad and roughly 1800 pages. I have started compiling a list of books to read and to help understand what exactly is going on in this field.

Does anyone have any suggestions on how to gain a better than average theoretical grasp on what is going on in these systems? Hearing my instructors and talking with them a bit, it appears that my earning potential depends on knowing more and being able to apply that knowledge. I am trying to target more of the industrial and very large commercial systems as that looks and feels like a better choice than servicing grandma's mini-split. I also have a potential job working with a large industrial refrigeration system that my employer uses, which is what pushed me into more schooling.

I suppose this thread could cover any other questions about refrigeration.

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I'm gonna read your textbook first

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      978-1631263545 is the 20th edition.

      978-1635638776 is the 21st which I could not find someone who has made a PDF copy as of yet.

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >I'm starting an HVAC AAS program

    Why is everyone doing this? Is the pay/demand really that good?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Is the pay/demand really that good?
      You'll earn more than twice what a university physics professor does.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        At some shithole degree mill? Yeah maybe but the physics faculty at my school all make at least six figures. A couple make mid-six figures. A tradie isn’t clearing 150 unless they own their own business.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Your school being?

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            dude, if you are an engineering or hard science prof, you're making bank

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Damn looked it up that's crazy. Makes sense why there's so many adjuncts these days

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >adjuncts
            oh ho ho ho, they get paid shit. the university system is buckling under the amount of people qualified for professorships and the amount of professorships, so universities hand out quasiprof titles left and right to give people work but not pay or treat them like full-fledged profs. it's not a good situation.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I don’t feel comfortable revealing that but trust me when I tell you that you would not be impressed at all by it. So I know if that’s what physics faculty make here then the faculty at the likes of the top dogs (Caltech, MIT, Harvard) must be making 200+ easy.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      OP here.

      So my job opportunity would be a 94k a year technician job, this is a 12k a year pay bump for from a building mechanic position. If I stick with industrial refrigeration or large commercial it’s basically 80k-120k a year pretty much wherever I go. If I strike out on my own or find a traveling job it is more like 130-150k a year.

      At some shithole degree mill? Yeah maybe but the physics faculty at my school all make at least six figures. A couple make mid-six figures. A tradie isn’t clearing 150 unless they own their own business.

      There is a shortage of qualified technicians. For whatever reason the broader industry stopped attracting enough new blood some years ago and the quality of technicians replacing the older generations is much lower.

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    ahem, THERMODYNAMICS

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    i'll also point out that people like engineering professors usually have side businesses that benefit from their work at their universities.
    so the revenue stream is good and there is always fresh meat to push through the grinder and do research for you

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Also similar for a lot of chemistry professors. Many of them have money rolling in or at least had a lot of money roll in from patented formulas.

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    1800 page manual on replacing starter caps lmfao

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    How old are you?
    Considering doing something like this at 28.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      31. I figure this is as good of a time as any to learn. I am really trying to hit the books and familiarize myself with as much as possible. I need to build a library and awareness that can take me through the next 30 years of career.

      https://www.danfoss.com/en-us/service-and-support/learning/#tab-overview

      I have seen this online learning platform from Danfoss. Has anyone looked at this before?

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    After getting an airconditioner after 25 years without one in a third world shithole, it feels so fricking good I unironically get aroused as I stretch out comfortably in bed.

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    OP bumping this to see if I can get any other answers.

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    This is like half a chapter in undergrad chemical engineering textbooks, and the exercises are full designs and specifications of such systems.

    Just learn it properly.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Can you give me an isbn I need some proof.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        For me, its Çengel and Boles

  10. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    you'll understand better once you start doing some hands-on labs
    >t. did my associates in HVAC but in IT now

  11. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    With refrigenators you can cool air to obtain energy.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Isn’t that backwards

  12. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The TXV (Thermal Expansion Valve) controls the rate of flow of high pressure liquid refrigerant into the large space of the the evaporator coil. There it evaporates into a gas, cooling. The evaporator coil is cooled and the environment heats the gas refrigerant. The refrigerant continues to the compressor where it is compressed bac into a liquid. The liquid is hot because it was compressed from a room temperature gas into a liquid (concentrating the heat, aka the kinetic energy of the atoms within). It then enters the condenser coil to radiate away that excess heat. The cooled liquid then doubles back to the TXV to start the process all over again.

    Somewhere you typically have a receiver drier (if it is on the liquid side) or an accumulator (if it is on the gas side). Both serve to filter and dry out the refrigerant. Drying it out using desiccant from the pervasive moisture of Earth is important because having other, non-refrigerant volatiles such as water can screw up the compressor.

  13. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Why not replace the expansion valve with a turbine that on the other side of the evaporator uses the energy to pre-compress the gas?
    Dehumidifies often use turbines to precipitate out the water.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      That’s basically a screw compressor.

  14. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Would it be at all practical to make an off grid refrigerator with compressed air? Use solar to run a compressor, store that in a big pressure tank, then run a line to a box with an expansion valve and run the cool air through piping in an insulated box?
    Is it possible to roughly translate consumption of a fridge to kWh produced by the panels, with some loses through the compression, decompression cycle?
    How do I calculate the necessary volume of the pressure vessel?
    Solar panels are affordable, battery banks are expensive. If a couple steel tanks could replace a chunk of energy storage, that would be pretty neat.

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