>runs when your computer is turned off

>runs when your computer is turned off

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    how

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Idk

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      CMOS battery

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      You ever power down your computer but all those pretty RGB lights on your motherboard are still flashing? Yeah that's because the motherboard still runs even when the 'nominal' power button is off, which means that the BIOS is still running. You have to shut off the switch on the power supply unit to really turn off a computer.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        No i don't because i disabled usb power in bios

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        How about simply enabling ErP in BIOS? My tower doesn't produce any light when turned off with ErP.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        isnt that because new power supplies contain a very small 5v mini power supply inside them to still provide a small amount power to all the rgb bullshit and such?

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          That pin has been standard for a long time. It predates the Intel glowie chip.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      AMD has its own version too, and it can't be turned off. The only thing you can really do against the IME is flip the hap bit somehow (which doesn't even fully shut it down, it just tells it to turn off some functionality that it may or may not do since you can't ever tell what it's doing). Flipping the hap bit requires libreboot/coreboot (though some Dells can do it, or something?). System76's machines (which basically have Coreboot) and Dasharo's motherboard firmware (basically Coreboot) can flip the hap bit, for example.

      I looked into this a bit a while ago when I was building a machine, and to be honest, all the stuff above seems like too much of a hassle. I read a post from one of the System76 guys a while ago, and his basic takeaway was that the IME is probably not as nefarious as people think. He did say that getting a chip that doesn't have AMT capability is probably a decent idea though.

      It is essentially another CPU inside your CPU. A black box with godmode capabilities that never turns off as long as the power is connected. It is actually "god mode" too, because it runs on on ring -3, which is below the OS (meaning the OS can't see it or do anything about it).

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        https://medium.com/swlh/negative-rings-in-intel-architecture-the-security-threats-youve-probably-never-heard-of-d725a4b6f831

        Oh frick you are right this -3 thing is real, oh oh, maybe it's not nefarious by itself but that looks mega dangerous wtf

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Based minix

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Read the flamewar between the SeL4 developers and the MINIX guy. He gets curb stomped. It's very cathartic

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        link?

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >he doesn't unplug and pull the cmos battery whenever he turns off his computer

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >he thinks they can't remotely jumpstart your mainboard circuits

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      You have serious mental problems

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        the only person that would make this reply is someone that is angry at the possibility of someone circumventing their spying device

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Obviously bad, but I just don't care anymore. things are so fricked just get outside and have some fun, stop wasting away here.

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    We have bigger problems to worry about right outside our windows, right now.

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I've seen youtube videos about this and AMD's strange ass technology and let me tell you all of these modern PC's after UEFI was invented, it's all real sus and most of it is mandatory, no way around it also since it runs on separate chips and even processors. I don't like all of this stuff in home use one bit, now I can agree with some of its intended uses like workspaces where if something goes wrong you can connect and check for files and whatnot, but it's all mega sussy, there's also the lojack on PC's (literally from the same company, but named computrace) which they ship on sleeping mode and they can flip a flag to enabled or sleep (if you turned it on by accident in which case you call them to disable it) and they can switch flags by serials via a gps like network, once you flip to the disable flag though it warns it cannot "be reversed" as it is permanent (to the end user, from my guess it's a killswitch that disables the chip from what I saw) but how do we really know whats going on? Yeah computrace is good for laptops up to a certain degree also but still kinda eerie.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      You can turn the AMD version off in the bios and also it's got no keys enrolled by default so it doesnt matter anyway

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Actual 1984 tier global surveillance backdoor.
    You can tell by how everyone is eerily quiet and apparently not bothered by this thing existing, especially all the privacy "advocates" who will call you a schizo for not trusting it.
    You'd think all those people running wireshark 24/7 and writing entire essays about the privacy concerns of windows pinging microsoft servers to sync with NTP would be literally foaming at the mouth at the mere thought of a thing like ME existing and yet, not a peep from 99% of them. The entire open source/free software world should be pumping hundreds of thousands of dollars of donations and even more developer hours of work to get rid of this thing, and yet the only fix existing is a python script written as a side project by a literally who and abandoned years ago, and literally nothing when it comes to the AMD equivalent.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Anyone credible who tries to go against the Intel ME will be automatically suppressed through that very same system

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      good post.
      its a mystery

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >and yet, not a peep from 99% of them. The entire open source/free software world should be pumping hundreds of thousands of dollars of donations and even more developer hours of work to get rid of this thing
      Because there has been ZERO evidence that the IME has acted like a backdoor, (i.e. active snooping with IME not enabled)

      There are two possibilities of why this is.
      1. There is no backdoor
      2. The lid is so absolutely tight that even after 13 years no evidence has been allowed to get out despite millions of devices with it existing and thousands of researchers, hackers and hobbyists analyzing and decompiling it.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        https://www.csoonline.com/article/572885/cybercriminals-look-to-exploit-intel-me-vulnerabilities-for-highly-persistent-implants.html

        It's not a "backdoor" in the traditional sense but it does act as a extra extra door if they find the right way, so yeah there is a reason for concern. It's like an extra door right beside the other door, it would never show backdoor pinging or any other activities, or any properties of one due to it's tightening and closed source coding but others see it as a freeway of sort, so yeah, it is in fact a problem anyways, even if it doesn't act like a typical opening, it would still end up as one eventually.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Give me a break.
        Using the thing for anything would constitute a serious security concern. Why would they go to the trouble if they have never used it?

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Nobody has decompiled it. Post files if so.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        It is a backdoor. Being the MASSIVE security vulnerability that it is makes it one. Look into SA-00075 (a.k.a. Silent Bob is Silent) or SA-00086. I'm surprised literally no one mentioned this, I thought you schizo freaks would already know.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      It's so weird. I thought it would be inevitable it would be cracked wide open sooner rather than later.
      Yet still nothing.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      It's a paid feature. You don't pay for it, so it's dormant and basically ignores all input and sends no packets. If you pay for it, it activates.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Fricking imbecile. The Intel Management Engine is always active even if you didn't pay for vPro.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          on that note, how can one use vPro? It's supposed to be an extra management layer, like VNC at the firmware level. But it does not seem to be doing anything in my home server.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >The entire open source/free software world should be pumping hundreds of thousands of dollars of donations and even more developer hours of work to get rid of this thing,
      but we're all neets or too busy or have no money

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      There is already a known solution to it (flipping the HAP bit) that even three letter agencies use. Barring that, there's RISC-V, which is not ready yet as far as I know.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Flipping the HAP is no full solution.
        Even with the HA flag set, it still swallows encrypted microcode updates for example.

        how hard can it be to put network sniffer on your router and see what intel IME is sending? fricking schizo

        It's trivial to exfiltrate data by other means.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >not a peep from 99% of them
      Typical schizophrenic ratio error debunks explodes the premises of his own argument.

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    What the frick? I thought you guys loved unix?

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    *laughs in libreboot*

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Wants to have Linux instead as firmware.
      Me too.

  10. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    even glowies dislike this shit. I think Dell managed to remove it for military laptops.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      If glowies despise it (and from what I read, they did a request via some request as to be able to disable it for the army personel you mentioned) the end consumer is screwed. and btw yea no one is looking for open source ways to disable it but I did see some guy had SOME knowhow and workaround to force a disable on particular models but it looked very wonky to me as it's by modified bios by said PC model injection, not by a particular tool like the official version of intelME disable tool (which is almost the same btw, just official, but it's instead a toolkit which chooses the model) leaving intelME on from what I've researched shouldn't be an issue in most user cases, as it's hardcoded in a cryptic way and not just anyone knows the ins and outs, but it's a side OS chip open port that is always on and it's vile, btw trying to remove the chip? Makes your mobo run 30 seconds and it shuts down, an anti tampering frick you for Intel users.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        sorry typo'd there, what I meant to say is they did the request via some paperwork

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >even glowies dislike this shit. I think Dell managed to remove it for military laptops.
      my sides
      glowies are the ones who pushed it for Intel, AMD, and I'm sure Apple
      but they of course didn't want the same backdoors on computers, that is why Intel ME can be mostly disabled in hardware

      you cannot do this with AMD, though
      probably because glowies only buy Intel and don't need AMD to have the switch
      why Intel? maybe because Intel uses US fabs

  11. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    watch vid below
    It's genuinely scary, typing from ME disabled box though. Secondhand dell high end for some bank director probably. They have an option to disabl eit professionally. There's also the rpi flasher which is inferior. But watch this video to learn what it is from the official side of the story as well. It's obviously also a backdoor but it's also obviously a legitimate valuable product for sysadmins in companies.
    Learn the history and tech instead of just going paranoid. Paranoia is the only sane response though, but only after understanding the system.

    Sidenote: bought sff elitedesk hp, older generation. Disabled MEBx with wrong pswd (default admin but typed wrong due to nonus keyboard). Now bootloop, peripherals not even powered. Nothing melted. RAM is fine. CMOS battery replaced. CPU nothing changed. Why am I getting blackscreened bootloops? PSU integral good quality. It's mobo (though green light) or intel me stuff. No screen, only fans, powere on light, mobo light, no beeps, no post i think. Hours spent on 30 USD second hand pc i was gonna hsg for lolz. Learned lots. Help me now.

    also these captchas hard af wtf

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Ok so in your case you may be lucky, your glitch (in this case your particular bootloop) may be fixed by USB Bios flash recovery, HP laptops have an internal secondary boot with a usb key / combination (you must have the special prepared usb inserted to launch it), which would lead you to a secondary bios boot location, as long as your system boots and you grab the proper usb recovery kit from your mode, inject said file using an alt windows, load the usb to bootlooping PC via usb, and you may just fix said bootloop, just dont go messing with the settings wrongly again. This also works on some newer PC's and brands. Best of luck

      this is why I use a surge protector, I flip the switch and BAM, can't run with no power.

      Still runs even without it, uses capacitor /cmos combination I think, but I bet there are some limitations as to what it runs/does without power

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        what is it doing when the computer doesn't have enough power to turn on?

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I believe it sends pings, keeps a constant check when it will wake on, monitor sleep status, etc, even with the intelME disabled Windows (or even the mobo) still pulls this shit off in sleep mode. If powered it can power on your PC, even from hibernate, run in semi sleep (aka pretend the monitor is off) and does other creepy stuff in background and make it feel not compromised. It's a nightmare, btw UEFI was spearheaded by Microsoft so yeah, even if "secure boot" is a thing all these things conveniently just magicked into PC's by that period.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Schizo tier shit, any of that would be easily captured by any third party firewall, in a business of 500+ intel machines I don't get a single network log of equipment turned off, even when they are plugged in. Hell it would be easily proven yet no one has done that.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Maybe the machine you're monitoring with also has Intel ME and it knows not to display certain information.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Its a paloalto firewall, who the frick uses a pc for firewall?

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Intel ME is a part of all Intel CPUs.
            You do use a PC to access the firewall, don't you?

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            It has 3G telecom on the CPU, smart guy.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            They're always quick to point the gun, pull the trigger with the word Squizo but are quick to also skip the details they may not be aware of, impatient to hear answers or find them unsatisfactory, that the other person may or not know how to fully explain, and disregard the person as "crazy" until the shit comes to wreck them also, call me crazy but I think you're onto something with the 3G on processors.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            If there a 3G backdoor is on processors, we really ought to figure it out
            People could mod their computers and get free internet on those backdoor networks

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            lmao good idea, but if it's 3G isn't it limited to dialup speeds??

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >3G telecom
            The Australian 3G towers are getting switched off in July/September this year. So that's good news for Intel users.
            Newer chips probably have 4G though.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            how hard can it be to put network sniffer on your router and see what intel IME is sending? fricking schizo

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I would, I may require new hardware for doing such tasks, and yeah maybe like everyone here is saying I won't find shit, but let me tell you with the vurnerabilities I wouldn't want this shit running either way

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Thx ill try with the usb alltough I dont think it'll work since peripherals dont seem to be powered anymore. Im just flashing the usb from a linuxbox dont think it has to be windows. also the elitedesk had some windows pro on it, I slapped fde lvm/luks debian on it before I cleared the tpm, wrongly cleared mebx and bricked it

        Intel ME runs an entire operating system of its own that could have wireless drivers for all you are aware of. Or maybe it just caches info for when you finally go online.
        Pick your 'fantasy'.

        Schizo tier shit, any of that would be easily captured by any third party firewall, in a business of 500+ intel machines I don't get a single network log of equipment turned off, even when they are plugged in. Hell it would be easily proven yet no one has done that.

        read more. runs minix, can acces peripherals. imei is on all pc's but obviously theyre not using it on all consumer pc's actively. Probably it's on and actively used as threeletter tier backdoor for badboys only, say 0.01% of consumers.
        There used to be special imei ports (think 1690-1695), imei just hijacks those and tells your little rooted os not to use and listen on those. Maybe a bsd based firewall without intel component (but they probably run intel nics so yeah there's that they would just ignore these ports as well) might pick up traffic.
        Start with my linked vid tired of spoonfeeding.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          If you do a full shutdown / powercycle etc and leave if without power in battery it may brick, but that's why you should quickly do the hp recovery research based on your model, also try smashing esc multiple times when the laptop or pc turns on before the bootloop, as it will show no logo but it may be still running, it will launch you to bios options quickly

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          bad boys bad boys, what chu gonna do

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            what chu gonna do when they come for you

  12. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    amazing
    I was gonna buy Intel.. imagine how sad I was when I noticed you had up-pay to get virtualization extensions.. and ECC support.. and most AVX512 extension..
    BUT.. then I noticed Intel were giving away this feature for FREE! ME in every cpu, even their cheapest! mad respect, very gracious of them
    maybe Intel-aviv aren't that bad?

  13. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    obsessed

  14. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Some system76 laptops disable the Intel ME system.

  15. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    this is why I use a surge protector, I flip the switch and BAM, can't run with no power.

  16. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >When your computer is powered off, it is essentially in a state of complete shutdown. During this time, the hardware components, including the CPU, memory, and storage, are not actively functioning. As a result, no software or processes can run on the computer.
    However, there are some exceptions to consider:

    >Wake-on-LAN (WoL): Some computers and network cards support a feature called Wake-on-LAN. With WoL, you can remotely wake up a powered-off computer by sending a special network packet to its network interface card. In this case, the computer is technically “off,” but it remains in a low-power state, ready to respond to the WoL signal.

    >Hardware Implants or Malware: Although highly unlikely for the average user, sophisticated attackers could potentially implant malicious hardware or firmware that remains active even when the computer is powered off. Such scenarios are rare and typically involve targeted attacks on specific individuals or organizations.

    >Battery-Powered Devices: If your computer has a built-in battery (such as a laptop), it may still have some residual power even when apparently turned off. In such cases, certain low-level processes (such as maintaining system time) can continue to run.

    >External Devices: Devices connected to your computer (e.g., USB drives, external hard drives, peripherals) can draw power from the USB ports even when the computer is off. However, this doesn’t mean software is running; it’s just a passive power supply.

    >In summary, while your computer is truly off, no software or applications can run. However, specific scenarios or features may allow limited functionality even during shutdown. Always ensure proper security practices to protect against any potential vulnerabilities.

    Sorry for using GPT but I was genuinely curious.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I don't use ethernet so I can't be waked on LAN.

  17. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    you can prove intel ME is a spy device by powering your computer off, leaving the battery in, and probing the traces on your board to see if any activity is happening

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      And you can prove it isn't by powering your computer off and monitoring the silence on the network ports it uses when it's on.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Wireless telecom on the CPU, check for that.

  18. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    And then what? If the network port is dead the thing isn't doing anything.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      From what I read it has extra forms to bypass these ports, but if you search well enough, yeah you can "physically" stop the ports from working, uknown if they use intel software as a way to bypass said ports, but yeah there has been known methods as to alleviate this port nonsense.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        What does that even mean? If the fricking physical layer 1 side isn't doing anything, ITS NOT DOING ANYTHING.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          :^)

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            IntelME :^(

            No IntelME... :^]

            Using anything that won't give you headaches later: :^))

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Software workarounds and loopholes aka when your PC is on it may still go for it and try to do the intelME somehow without using the primary ports, one can never be too sure, what I did is run the intelME checking tool and learned some PC's have it "active" and those that don't/disabled, it will say it in different ways, it's somewhat easy to find

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            gpt

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        You can't use special intel software to breach the laws of physics.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Intel ME runs an entire operating system of its own that could have wireless drivers for all you are aware of. Or maybe it just caches info for when you finally go online.
          Pick your 'fantasy'.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I don't use ethernet though. Not to say that it isn't a concerning chip, but I doubt it can store all these wireless drivers from the factory, sounds like a bit of a waste of time.

            The concept that you can't physically monitor what is going out of the computer is also a silly idea

  19. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    [ ] Trust Intel
    [x] Don't Trust Intel

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      AMD's PSP is an ARM Cortex A5 with some private SRAM, a hardware crypto engine (a rather impressive one, if I may add), and on chip boot rom. The PSP has unlimited DMA access into every memory region, and can even override the IOMMU.

      It features an fully fledged operating system, called "Kinibi" (formerly <t-base) by Trustonic. It loads various drivers and applications during bootup. One of them is the fTPM, which is a trusted application emulating a TPM module.

      On Ryzen processors with integrated graphics, HDCP is handled by the PSP. It is also responsible for DRAM initialization, and supervises the boot process.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >a rather impressive one, if I may add
        absolute fricking garbage. you morons on this board are truly unbelievable spastics.
        https://github.com/PSPReverse/amd-sp-glitch

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Is this post written by fricking ChatGPT? Nobody I have met in real life has ever used "fully fledged" and this reads like an advertisement.
        Oh yeah, and ChatGPT lists things too, and this reads like a list. Since when does AMD feel the need to shill their coprocessors on IQfy?

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Paste it to GPT and ask it if it wrote that. It'll tell you.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I use "full-fledged" sometimes. But never "FULLY-fledged". Only chatbots do that.

  20. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >unplug ethernet cable after shutdown
    What can IME do to circumvent this? Save its logs and send them when the ethernet is plugged back in and the computer turned on?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      In theory that, keep separate processes running and who knows, but not much since the ethernet is unplugged.

  21. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    doesn't run on my machine (c)(r)(tm)

    https://github.com/mostav02/Remove_IntelME_FPT

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I was checking this, buuuut I found another link and:

      "The me_cleaner project [https://github.com/corna/me_cleaner], in development for several years, has created a special utility for deleting most of the image and leaving only the components vital for the main system. But even if the system starts, the joy is short-lived—after about 30 minutes, the system may shut down automatically. The reason is that, after some failures, ME enters Recovery Mode, in which it can operate only for a certain period of time. As a result, the cleaning process becomes more complicated. For example, with earlier versions of Intel ME, it was possible to reduce the image size to 90 KB but the Intel ME 11 image can only be reduced to 650 KB."

      https://www.ptsecurity.com/ww-en/analytics/disabling-intel-me-11-via-undocumented-mode/

      So...

      Just be careful if you're gonna experiment with this shit as "neutralizing" the ME part may work, may take a while and you pull it off (backup the firmware) but then if you did something wrong oops, at least the 30 minute window may be enough to restore the firmware if anything goes wrong.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >https://www.ptsecurity.com/ww-en/analytics/disabling-intel-me-11-via-undocumented-mode/
        interesting. thanks, anon.

  22. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It's literally just software to bring up hardware and manage it.
    Enterprise cucks can use it for spooky out of band management, but that code isn't usable unless you can activate and enable it. Barring some unknown exploit vector, it isn't possible.
    Obviously nonfree shitware being so ingrained in powering hardware is insane and I wish we could stop it, but that isn't happening soon, unless you buy a Talos II desktop and be one of the few thousand people who run a ppc64le desktop with it.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Out of band management
      In other words:

      Launch the IntelME on target PC by remotely registering it, once connected online you can see what files and changes are done on said PC, can even download said files remotely speaking like as in Anydesk or any remote tool.

      Can reconfig, ping and do a quite a few commands, that is to say this is used in an ethical stolen PC scenareo or remote management by an IP for a PC hard to reach or related situations. Can bypass security levels at the same time as even if the "perpetrator" (the target PC and the user) even IF he used a firewall the chip can bypass all securities because it is launched freeport right beside the firewall aka the firewall is useless (in a situation where sensitive data is stolen it can be in theory retreived if the same hdd or drive is used, and if changed it will still ping back and any hdd can still be accessed)

      >Not a concern to everyone else who this can be exploited

      ok

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        You can't remotely register it. If you have a consumer sku you can't even futz with it at all.

  23. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    it cannot run without power, I don't have CMOS battery and PSU cable is disconnected.

    I am safe, also running amd cpu

  24. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >unplugs pc

  25. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It’s probably a physical access back door. Not a network one.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      It's a network one and the chip can bypass the firewalls once connected, it's not some rando physical backdoor, more like a pseudo phyical root access via network tunnels.

  26. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >tfw I paid $200 extra for a motherboard with a BMC when I could have just used IME for free
    really? that's stupid now I feel like I got scammed

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Yeah in your case that could be a thing, IntelME could be useful, if the server board already had an upgraded IntelME, but the thing is I think you need to pay for the implementation license fee of the Intel corporate user interface that is related to it, and it's a hefty ton of a price (iirc 800+ or some shit) to be able to use it, because it requires to go through Intel's channels. I looked it up to see if I could use the software to take "ownership" of my boards but no, it's quite expensive, so yeah IntelME comes free, the software to manage it and implement it is the catch.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        instead of disabling Intel ME we should be focused on making it run our own open software instead. Are there any projects towards that? Is it even possible? When I search for it all I find are scripts and programs to disable parts of it.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          It's a smoll chip, I think 1mb, if you tamper it, you risk the board's safe mode to enable, because the mobos depend on some instructions from the chip to run normally. Now if you did alter it far enough that it had the instructions, what ? maybe a small software could be run, maybe Doom, because: will Doom run in a IntelME chip? Even if it does the mobo needs the chip somehow unless said chip could be expanded, it's not documented territory to run Doom from some not open source and impractical chip, I say go for it but it may be tricky, since as you can see on the github the whole process to modify the firmware is long and risky, and if you mess up you have to desolder and reflash manually I think, but sounds neat.

  27. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    This board is filled with absolute morons who know nothing about technology

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Don't bully me.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Stop confidently making assertions about things you have no understanding of

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >stop confidently making assertions about things you have no understanding of
          The competent are empowered by morons here, because the morons minds are open to make any connection.
          This is well know moron.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            No the morons run around screaming useless noise about things they don't understand and make it impossible to get any useful info from this board.
            Some idiot screaming about ime on IQfy isn't going to make some magical superhacker look into it and figure it out.
            There is plenty of information about it out there and instead of reading any of it and understanding that information people just scream backdoor over and over again and post moronic shit like oh it uses a 3g modem to send spying data so unplugging a network cable doesn't do anything.

  28. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Oh no no, vile da jooos now know about your love to little kids? Ahaha, I have nothing to hide.
    *exhibitionist*

  29. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    They don't even need to backdoor your hardware anymore, all your activity goes to cloud servers if you're on Windows.
    They can write exploits for programs that have an open port too.

  30. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    my pc has no electicity and on the same power strip is also the network switch which then has no electricity. my pc does not have wlan. Guess I am fine.

  31. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >~~*Intel*~~

  32. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    https://www.tomshardware.com/news/how-use-intel-sa-00086-detection-tool,36003.html

    I will run this tool, I ran two, one showed as disabled I think but this one showed as "error", my guess is Intel wants this process to be confusing as to force you to download these "updated drivers" instead of just patching out the god damned thing already, this whole thing needs further research and actual clear solutions

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      i thought you were referencing those IME removal tools (which it isn't), but it made me want to say this:

      be VERY careful when running any of these tools that claims it can turn off the IME, especially if you are running a relatively new intel CPU. in newer intel CPUs, the IME is required for your system to turn on fully
      you can brick your CPU (what a funny phrase), and i don't even know how you'd recover from that. maybe a clone of all binaries from another working CPU of the same model? how would you even get that?
      in any case, don't be a moron and brick your CPU

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        is that even possible to brick a cpu? I mean overheat or short yeah but do cpus even have brickable stuff?

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          it's like

          I was checking this, buuuut I found another link and:

          "The me_cleaner project [https://github.com/corna/me_cleaner], in development for several years, has created a special utility for deleting most of the image and leaving only the components vital for the main system. But even if the system starts, the joy is short-lived—after about 30 minutes, the system may shut down automatically. The reason is that, after some failures, ME enters Recovery Mode, in which it can operate only for a certain period of time. As a result, the cleaning process becomes more complicated. For example, with earlier versions of Intel ME, it was possible to reduce the image size to 90 KB but the Intel ME 11 image can only be reduced to 650 KB."

          https://www.ptsecurity.com/ww-en/analytics/disabling-intel-me-11-via-undocumented-mode/

          So...

          Just be careful if you're gonna experiment with this shit as "neutralizing" the ME part may work, may take a while and you pull it off (backup the firmware) but then if you did something wrong oops, at least the 30 minute window may be enough to restore the firmware if anything goes wrong.

          says
          that specific tool nukes the IME's firmware and (i assume) inserts in its place a piece of code that tells it to turn off/function differently, or something
          if you use this tool on the wrong CPU model (a newer one, for instance) you will nuke parts of the CPU's firmware that are required for booting your system, etc
          >is that even possible to brick a cpu?
          it's possible to brick anything that has firmware on it, as far as i know. bricking just means that the machine becomes unresponsive to inputs that it normally would respond to, making it as useful as a brick

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            What CPU's have firmware? What kinds of instructions besides booting (which I just found the bios is supposed to do) would a CPU have?

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            all modern CPUs have firmware aka microcode. It affects how instructions are processed and executed.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I wish people would stop using the word firmware.
            The more correct term is cuckware.
            The only firmness that exists with most this shitware is the fact it is cryptographically signed and verified, thus literal computer cuckoldry.
            Back in the old days, you'd have to frick with the actual hardware to write new code to it.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Flaccidware

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          The other guy is wrong to some degree, essentially the IME is required at boot before the CPU "turns on", along with the RAM. It's approval is required for your PC to boot.

  33. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    My Macbook Pro M2 doesn't have this problem.

    Cheers.

  34. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    deboonked by hex rays employee

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      That's moronic, the capabilities are listed on Intel's site. The only thing in question is, do certain agencies have access to the keys that signed ME? And is there a default provisioning which enables a backdoor? Until Intel makes with the source code for Intel ME you can't check either way. I don't need some moron to tell me otherwise, this is simple logic.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Black person he literally reverse engineered intel ME
        get off this board

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Nothing you said changes what the person you replied to said either. No one knows who has access to the key material that signs valid payloads that can run in ME's space. It's still a botnet.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Nothing you said changes what the person you replied to said either.
            >And is there a default provisioning which enables a backdoor? Until Intel makes with the source code for Intel ME you can't check either way.
            >Black person he literally reverse engineered intel ME

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            If its been entirely reverse engineered then why can't it be disabled on all CPUs

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            because its signed
            certain parts of it can be disabled as noted by one of the people who reverse engineered it (he is also a speaker in the talk linked before)
            https://github.com/corna/me_cleaner/wiki/How-does-it-work%3F

            That doesn't fricking mean anything you absolute moronic Black person homosexual.
            Some cia Black person can still compel the key holder of Intel ME to build valid signed and executable malware and you have ZERO RECOURSE to prevent it.

            you dumb Black person homosexual idiot stupid blah blah blah ... im objecting to the
            >you cant check either way
            bit because its plain wrong
            i never disputed the fact that other agencies can use the same signing key

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            That doesn't fricking mean anything you absolute moronic Black person homosexual.
            Some cia Black person can still compel the key holder of Intel ME to build valid signed and executable malware and you have ZERO RECOURSE to prevent it.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          > t. glown
          He's ripping out pieces of it. It's not been reversed.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            hes ripping it out blidnly then? writing random bytes at random offsets?

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Wait he got root on a running Intel ME MINIX instance and then dumped the unencrypted filesystem?

          Oh, no. He didn't.

  35. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    https://www.reddit.com/r/programming/comments/makszo/two_undocumented_intel_x86_instructions/

    There have also been undocumented instructions found that allow fishing around in the microcode functionality of x86 chips. It is safe to assume all modern integrated circuits have intelligence service mandated tampering. And by mandated I mean you will be sanctioned out of existence (see lavabit email service) if you don’t comply. Look at the history of the cia over the second half of the 20th century, you are a scitzo if you don’t believe that modern circuits are backdoored, just like all other technology and social institutions.

    Also you can look up data exfiltration methods but there are literally dozens of methods to exfiltrate data in air gapped system like heat, sound etc etc, other physics based stuff.

    When you put all of this together it seems obvious any chip in the last ~~~15 years is basically a fricking listening device. I would also assume that this type of functionality is very rarely activated unless you are like a nation state actor who is a serious threat, but the fact these systems are in place is telling where the future is headed, if the only way you can maintain order is by backdooring every fricking chip and social institution then you become the dictator in some sense.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous
    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous
  36. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >he doesn't have a physical power disconnect switch on his PC

  37. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >jpg

  38. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >has a physical internet kill switch when he isn't using it.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Won't unplug the ethernet overnight even when it may cause the internet funnies

  39. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Good thing I never turn off my computer then

  40. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    iTODDLERS BTFO

  41. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >noo it uses special hidden packets that no firewall can see
    T. absolute moron that has no idea how computers work but love hearing themselves talk

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      If this were the case, I'm pretty sure you could just sniff the cables?

  42. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    more than half the comments here are trying to muddy the waters like flat earthers or no-spacers do in real conspiracy threads. the other half barely has any idea what they are talking about. there are a few good posts trying to provide actual information, but nobody's paying attention. this is sad. and good enough proof that there's something more to the ME that needs to be explored further.

  43. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    why is it so fricking hard to give me a fricking cpu with a flat memory space without anything else.

  44. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    So what would the solution be if I wanted to build an airtight computer with no easy sidechannel attacks, no ME, no backdoors, no spectre, no meltdown, etc?
    Get a really old system and use that completely offline, or what?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >no easy sidechannel attacks
      Don't use it in public
      >no ME
      Older password
      >no backdoors
      Impossible. You either wrote the OS and all apps yourself or you have to trust that those that did aren't malicious. If you don't trust your vendors and you can't write an OS, then you have to stop using a computer.
      >no spectre
      Only relevant if OpFor can already run code on your machine. So if you trust your OS and your apps and your OS and apps are patched, you are immune. If you don't share the machine, you are immune.
      >no meltdown
      See above.

  45. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    IQfy when
    >iLO
    ...
    >iDRAC
    ...
    >IPMI
    ...
    >Intel ME
    picrel

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