Scam books

Self help books are literally the new modern sophism

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    You're preaching to the choir here. How exactly do you expect us to respond here? We know self help books aren't really all that great.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      It's fun to shit on these books

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        If that's your idea of fun then I feel sorry for you, but carry on I guess.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >I feel sorry for you
          >I guess
          could you be any more of an insufferable, pretentious midwit?

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >art of clear thinking
    >fighter pilot
    They literally think they're seeing aliens.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Atomic habits is drivel for non-morons but for those who struggle with remedial executive functions I have seen it help them.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    If you don't take them to be the objective truth and panacea that they all claim to be, then you can derive some decent lessons from them

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I read a couple out of curiosity and they seemed mostly stoicism for dummies and armchair philosopher tier advices.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    is there a single self help book that is actually legit?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I don't think any of those typical self help books is useful but there are some books related to self help that are slightly more scientific that can be somewhat helpful. There are books on sleep, on breathing techniques, books on fitness etc. that contain non-trivial information and can be useful.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Layman therapy for specific issues goes a long way towards recognizing the patterns and building replacement habits and skills. Plenty of people are walking around who aren't quite severely pathological and respond well to being given that kind of agency. I'd argue that self-guided therapy like that is a key factor in improvement, but I don't have any studies on hand. It works well for nontraditional addiction models that target underlying mental health and mental processes as well as milder PTSD.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Dopamine Nation by Anna Lembke changed my life and I don’t say that lightly. It actually changed the way I operate on a day to day basis. It presents you with several studies and informed anecdotes about the psychology behind addictive behavior (social media, porn, video games, IQfy).

      There are books in that category that I’d label “self improvement” rather than “self help”. Nobody’s above improvement. Thinking that there’s not a single book out there that can teach you something new and improve the quality of your life is pure hubris.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >Thinking that there’s not a single book out there that can teach you something new and improve the quality of your life is pure hubris.
        It's true though. These books are all written under the false premise that one has "free will" and has the power to violate the rules of the universe.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          The books are part of how the deterministic universe unfolds, they can influence your deterministic brain.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Cope.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I think that self help books are not very useful for different reasons but when you look around you, some people obviously change.
            Imo those philosophical positions don't entail what many people think they do. For example atheism doesn't entail materialism, relativism doesn't entail that you can't criticise anyone and determinism doesn't entail that people can't change.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Why did you write this comment, anon? Answer me that, if you can.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Because I believe in truth and science and hate scamming bullshit

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            But why did you bother to write out a comment on an image board if everything is deterministic and our lives are merely rolling out on pre-built tracks?

            It seems you were trying to inform me of something- which would subsequently impact my way of thinking. Surely that’s a futile effort, since free will does not exist?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Simply because I hate bullshit pseudoscience and I acted according to that hatred.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            > I acted

            Did you, now?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >Being this much of a pedantic pseud homosexual

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >no argument
            >”ur a homosexual”

            Why get upset, anon? Our interaction has been predetermined, after all. You were always going to come up short, unable to make your case. Might as well lighten up while things play out the way they inevitably do, right?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >informed anecdotes
        Lol

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Anna Lembke is Chief of the Stanford Addiction Medicine Dual Diagnosis Clinic at Stanford University. In the book she includes examples of interactions she has had with her patients (with their consent and names changed).

          So yes: those are anecdotes, selected and interpreted by a party informed on the subject.

          Any more snark?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Post one of these ancedotes

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            no

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Addiction isn't real thoughever

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          https://i.imgur.com/nDqKc6W.jpeg

          Anna Lembke is Chief of the Stanford Addiction Medicine Dual Diagnosis Clinic at Stanford University. In the book she includes examples of interactions she has had with her patients (with their consent and names changed).

          So yes: those are anecdotes, selected and interpreted by a party informed on the subject.

          Any more snark?

          rekt

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      No. You need to read philosophy otherwise you become someone who reads self-help (a slave according to Aristotle and Nietzsche).
      https://www.chesterton.org/the-revival-of-philosophy-why/

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I started reading Psycho-Cybernetics after someone on here recommended it....and it's working. Maltz brings together the best of eastern and western thought into a simple, lucid, and astonishingly effective framework for living well. It would not be an overstatement to say that I am a changed man on account of it.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous
    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Every genuinely good book is a good self help book, just like any nutritious meal is a good self help meal and any fulfilling hobby is a good self help hobby.
      In Search of Lost Time is a legit self help book. Crime and Punishment is a legit self help book. Expose yourself to good things and you will live a better life.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Perhaps not the best place to ask but did anyone read this?

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Not sure why Goggins is on there. I read his first book, maybe this one is different. “Can’t Hurt Me” pretty interesting profile of a guy with childhood trauma and consequent supremely fricked up view of what it takes to “be a tough guy”.

    He’s clearly bonkers but does seem to inspire normal people to put on their running shoes a bit more regularly. It’s not a “follow these 5 simple steps to become a millionaire!” type of book.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It's hard being smart enough to quickly understand what somebody is trying to accomplish with what they say. Ideally it would be best to be just a little bit dumb enough not to question motivational advice.
    It's rare to be smart enough to constantly second guess what you're being told but also emotionally strong enough to willingly visualize and believe in useful lies when it's in your best interest on a personal, self-confidence level.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I like to make fun of these type of books but can't help but notice that every person that I know who reads them is more successful in life (material aspect) than me and all my other friends who like philosophy, feels bad, man.

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    In my circle, peoples reading this kind of books are from high-middle classe, already "successful" (a degree, garantied job etc) because of their situation. They didn't became like this because of theses books, but i think this kind of books help them assume that they are there thanks to their "efforts" and because they are better than others

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    You've got to be a real fricking idiot to fall for this shit. This is the book equivalent of getting scammed by cold callers pretending to be your bank.

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