>Science still hasn't discovered what wavelength correspond to Magenta and White

>Science still hasn't discovered what wavelength correspond to Magenta and White
>People still believe that colors are absolutely related to wavelengths
When will we get out of this phase?

Shopping Cart Returner Shirt $21.68

DMT Has Friends For Me Shirt $21.68

Shopping Cart Returner Shirt $21.68

  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    you forgot to add, black is not a color, because it is the absence of any color

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      black lights matter

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Black is the color the mind uses to represent the absence of photons hitting the eyes. Thus, color is in the mind, not in the world.

      The only people who are confused by color are people who still believe in naive realism.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        black is not a color idiot, what are you talking about? i didnt understand jackshit of what you were saying with that naive realism

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >i didnt understand jackshit of what you were saying with that naive realism
          Take that as a sign that you're out of your depth.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >representing a sequence of events from right to left
        Disregarded, did not read. I don't value the opinions of people too stupid to understand that all sequences should be represented from left to right when communicating in English.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonynous

          Filtered moron. It didn't even occur to me.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Science still hasn't discovered what wavelength correspond to Magenta and White
    The combined wavelengths of base wavelengths? They still behave as a singular wave and the varying wavelength can be mapped as a wavefunction of the change of the oscillation through time, as to where the association with a specific colour comes from, and why it is qualitatively expressed as it is, is a different question entirely.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      define "base wavelength"
      yellow is perceived as a mix of red and green light, yet do we still define it as a "singular wave"?
      what make it any different from magenta at all?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Doesn't matter if it's a constituent wave or if the base wavelengths are made from any wavelengths, it's the specific combination of electromagnetic oscillations which elicits the reaction, more specifically the rate of energy flow in a certain pattern is what elicits the reaction as all electromagnetic radiation is the same thing just dilated/contracted such that the energy transfer rate is increased/reduced, so colour perception is more accurately related to the energy transfer rate per unit of time

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        What we interpret as white light is any light consisting of a near-uniform superposition of visible wavelengths. The sun's emitted spectrum is not uniform, but when you factor in Rayleigh scattering and absorption lines in the atmosphere, the intensity distribution of the incident spectrum from the Sun (at least the part our eyes our sensitive to) flattens out pretty significantly.

        We have three types of retinal cones that correspond to peak absorptions of about 420, 530, and 560 nm (all with different standard deviations in absorption). We interpret color based on relative difference in the absorbed light from the different cones: The bigger the difference, the more saturated the particular color our brain interprets, and the smaller the difference the more desaturated the color. So white light is just what we interpret when the distinction in intensity across the absorbed bands of wavelengths is negligible.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Thanks for effortpost

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        We see magenta when our red and blue cones respond simultaneously. However there is no "simple" wavelength that will do so, only combinations of multiple waves (see the low overlap of S and L cones). The same is not true of yellow, which as you mention is caused by responses in red and green, M and L cones. But because of the overlap photons with only specific wavelengths (~570-590 nm) such as those emitted by lasers, will stimulate both of those cones so we will perceive the color yellow.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          magenta is because your receptors are too pussy to see there are more types of brown and it's a shade of diminished spectra peaking before the high end

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          equations exist for superposition of waves though. should be able to write some composite wavelength of the superposition of two waves

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Sure, but that's the difference between magenta/white and yellow/cyan. The latter don't require that composition, while the former do.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            True

            samegay

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            There's something wrong about it

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Probably two color receptors vs three color receptors being excited?

  3. 1 month ago
    Barkon

    Magneta is pure wavelength

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    White and magenta both can only be displayed through a combination of wavelengths.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >OP showing off the colors for his feather boa again

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    color of love and color of benevolence
    they're both special so they were made that way to highlight that

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >People still believe that colors are absolutely related to wavelengths
    They are absolutely related to wavelengths. A color is a distribution over wavelengths, and the distributions corresponding to magenta and white are very well understood.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The schizopost is stale as frick, frick off.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >durr chords can't be isolated to single wavelengths, therefore sound isn't related to pressure waves.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    buy a spectrometer instead of shitposting this board over and over

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    still believe that colors are absolutely related to wavelengths

    What else would it be you fricking homosexual. Do you randomly see magenta out of fricking nowhere? No? Then its your retarted brain interpreting signals that it is recieving. Particular wavelenghts or some combination of them, certain interactions of photons, doesn't matter, its basically the same thing. If producers of the screens that we look at your retarted picture at knew how to make them show magenta, then guess what, magenta isn't some kind of unsolved mystery.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >This amount of sperging
      Looks like you felt called out by this thread, it takes one to know one.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      There is a difference between colors being caused by wavelengths and wavelengths BEING color. That's the key question.

      This is really a philosophical discussion, which is why it goes by so many stem bro's heads.

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Magenta light didn't exist before the RGB system was created

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      True

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous
      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        There is no magenta light here, only pigment

        [...]
        samegay

        moron schizo

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          The only way you can see it is through light bouncing off it. That's how the camera which took the photo saw it, too.

  13. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Honestly the science behind purple is absolutely fascinating. The blend of low/high wavelengths to create a continuous colour wheel is the closest evidence I've seen to intelligent design.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Magenta is the color of love, you'd bet that God would give a special quality to that color.

  14. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Computers have always used 3 numbers to represent colors.
    That should tell you that 1 number cannot do it (easily, without some advanced math frickery) otherwise programmers would not waste the additional memory and complexity.
    Wavelength is 1 number.

  15. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    among the six colors that a computer's rgb produces (red, yellow, green, cyan, blue, magenta), magenta is the only one whose FF are separate from each other (FF00FF)

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      That is almost as insightful as pointing out that of all the words you used in your post, "is" is the only two letter word.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Woah, it's a hole in the middle

  16. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Sure they have. It's the interference pattern between 700nm and 400nm light.

  17. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    color is a mental construct. light sources just excite different part of the mental state related to color. anyone who tell you otherwise is an NPC.
    try to do a DMT trip and tell me that light creates colors.
    lol, lmao even.

  18. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Hue color and temperature are different.
    Hue can be a psychiatric definition of color, color is the definition of either temperature or Hue, temperature is in related to the spectral decomposition of black body radiation. Color is seen as the composition of various spectra, and Hue therefore is the qualitative scattering of light which gives those colors

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Red is for hot temperature
      Green is for temperate temperature
      Blue is for cold temperature

      So what is Magenta then?

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Red is for hot temperature
        >Blue is for cold temperature

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Cot temperature. Or hold temperature if you prefer.

  19. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Never

  20. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Apparently not a lot of animals are capable of seeing the color Red, as they mostly specialize in seeing UV colors instead

    Nature has deemed Red not so important to be seen, for some reason

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Nature has deemed Red not so important to be seen, for some reason

      If you are a deer, moving at dusk/dawn mostlly, why would you care about red. You don't really eat anything red.

      UV is highest at dusk/dawn so it would make sense for most animals that utilize that to specialize in that light. For predators too.

      There is also a trade off for light sensitivity and seeing color. Movement detection in low light crucial compared to red.

      That said, primates that pick berries and/or watch for red fertile asses to frick would care about red....

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *