The Cleanest Taboo in History

St. Jerome didn't have a bath for forty years. Queen Isabella, of Spain, who supplied Columbus with the men and means that led to the "discovery" of America, was given a bath the day she was born, another on her wedding day and a third after death, when she was prepared for burial. A famous English prelate never bathed and never changed his clothes. New robes were put over the old ones which were allowed to rot and fall off. Wherever he went, worms, maggots and vermin fell from his robes. There are records of men being tired in court and accused if heresy or infidelity for having bathed.

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  1. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    Buckle's History of Civilization says:
    >Bathing, being pleasant as well as wholesome, was a particularly grievous offense; and no man could be allowed to swim on Sunday. It was, in fact, doubtful whether swimming was lawful for a Christian at any time, even on week-days, and it was certain that God had on one occasion shown his disapproval by taking the life of a boy while he indulged in that carnal vice. As bathing was a heathenish custom, all public baths were to be destroyed (by order of the Spanish clergy), and even all baths in private houses.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      In the early part of the 19th century bathtubs and washstands were unknown in Europe. There were no washing facilities at the court of Catherine de Medici so that the seat of the court was changed ninty times in the course of six years so that the filthy rooms could once more be habitable. There were three thousand rooms in the palace of the Spanish kings, the Escorial , but not a single bathroom. There was no bathroom in the palace of the sun king at Versailles. A bath tub presented to the king was placed in the park and converted into a fountain because there was no one to use it.

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        Only at irregular intervals did people of the period cleanse themselves. For the most part they perfumed themselves several times daily instead of bathing. Only decades later did men began to bathe themselves again and John Wesley dared to proclaim that" cleanliness is next to Godliness." There is a vast difference between this doctrine announced by Wesley and the proceeding one, that filthiness is next to Godliness which allowed St.Patrick to acquire sainthood merely by becoming the filthiest man in Ireland.

        • 1 week ago
          Anonymous

          In this respect Benjamin Franklin was a man ahead of his time; he imported a bath tub from France in 1778. This caused quite a stir among his acquaintances, but did not dent the social ostracism of bathing. Forty years later, during the presidency of James Monroe, a White House scandal was created when he said simply that he was going to take a bath. He went into another room and took a bath in a tub for which he paid twenty dollars. His political advisers screamed to high heaven about this indecency of his. There was a rumor that later, Andrew Jackson threw out Monroe's bath tub. At any rate, in 1873 the Commissioner of Public Health Buildings called attention to the unsanitary condition of the President's home, and mentioned it's lack of bathrooms. In 1849 a " public Bathing and Washing Association" was established in New York for the purpose of supplying bathing facilities for the people of New York City. There were few baths at the time.

          • 1 week ago
            Anonymous

            It is amusing to recall medical opposition to the use of the bathtub, as amusing as their violent opposition to railways and rapid travel thereon. Just as they declared rapid travel would be extremely dangerous to the public health and advocated building a wall ten feet high on each side of the track; so, when the bathtub was introduced into America, the medical profession denounced it as an "obnoxious toy from England," and passed resolutions and called on the government to prohibit its use because it would bring on "phyhisis, rheumatic fever, inflammation of the lungs and a whole category of zymotic diseases."

          • 1 week ago
            Anonymous

            Some of the conquistadors thought the reason the Aztec and other Mesoamericans kept dying from smallpox was because they bathed too much
            And Spain literally banned bathing in Mexico by the natives

          • 1 week ago
            Anonymous

            The Phoenicians were preparing soap from goat tallow and wood ashes in 600BC (they used it to barter with the Gauls), and the Celts produced something similar, which they called "saipo" (so much for the Mount Sapo theory). But none of these people realised that they could use the stuff for washing. Until the 2nd century AD, soap was used either as a treatment for skin conditions or as a sort of hair gel. With the decline of the Pax Romana, Europe almost forgot about soap. In 1672, a German sending a box of Italian soap to a Lady von Schleinitz felt it prudent to enclose a set of instructions as to its use.

          • 1 week ago
            Anonymous

            The saxons even had to slaugther the danes because they were bathing too much!

          • 1 week ago
            Anonymous

            nah hol up
            them phoenicians was black PUNICS
            sheeit

          • 1 week ago
            Anonymous

            Bathing together with sick people definitely did spread smallpox

          • 1 week ago
            Anonymous

            I can almost smell the crusty buttholes and musky body odor of Isabella

            Is like toddlers who refuse to bath when they are full of muck

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      Kek, even by whig history standards, this is utter rubbish

  2. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    Why are those black people cooking the white people in your picture? Are they cannibals?

  3. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    >A famous English prelate never bathed and never changed his clothes
    Who?
    >There are records of men being tired in court and accused if heresy or infidelity for having bathed.
    Proof?

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      Shower, now.

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        Evidence not found

  4. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    Bathing had been a thing in Europe since Ancient times.
    It fell out of fashion as a result of the black plague.
    Europeans were advanced enough to understand there had to be some physical cause (and not just God's wrath like dumb brownoids thought), but failed to identity the real culprit and blamed water instead.

    So they stopped bathing from the 15th century until the early 18th century.
    It's in that era that all the infamous "smelly Europeans" stories come from (notably the Versailles court).

  5. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    imagine the smell

  6. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    Europeans bathed a lot in the medieval period, but something happened going into the early modern that turned it into a taboo.

  7. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    "By the fifteenth-century, bath feasting in many town bathhouses seems to have been as common as going out to a restaurant was to become four centuries later. German bath etchings from the fifteenth century often feature the town bathhouse, with a long row of bathing couples eating a meal naked in bathtubs, often several to a tub, with other couples seen smiling in beds in the mid-distance."

    "contrary to popular belief, on the whole at this time, it doesn’t seem as if most church organizations had a big problem with the bathing itself, just the perceived immorality exhibited at many bath houses. For example, 6th century Pope Gregory I is known to have encouraged Christians to bathe regularly. "

    As to Isabella, if its even true, one can simply wash the feet, head, and other parts and will always be clean even without full baths.
    A bowl with water is enough.

    These narratives are just born out of cherrypicking. Progressives are always mad about the coolest part of history so they gotta make up myths.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      >just the perceived immorality exhibited at many bath houses
      ayo

  8. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    Thousands of years earlier God had already given the Hebrews strict laws about cleansing themselves, personal hygiene, washing their hands, not touching unclean things and health and dietary restrictions.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      That's not about health, hygiene or cleanliness as such, it's about avoiding the cooties. There is some overlap, like touching a corpse makes one "unclean." But being covered in dirt doesn't make you "unclean" nor require you to bathe, while merely sitting on a chair that a menstruating woman has sat on does. It's just based on what the people in that society found icky.

  9. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    Revolting freaks.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      Dirty, smelly, filthy euros.

  10. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    I haven't bathed or showered in probably about seven years now. I rub myself down with a wet rag or sponge plus soap two or three times per month, otherwise I just rub off my armpits, groin etc with paper towels if it's too smelly. I almost never change clothes either, on average I wear a pair of jeans for a month, a shirt two or three weeks, and the same socks until they get holes in them everywhere

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      i don't believe you

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      >cleanest white person

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        >white

  11. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    Okay and?

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      Time for shower.

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