>the human eye can only see 60 frames per second you know

>the human eye can only see 60 frames per second you know

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I like that it went from 24, then 30, then to 60, if next gen consoles are dogshit again and barely manage 30 it'll go back to 30 fps won't it?

    • 2 months ago
      OS MASTER

      Technically it's 30 per eye which adds up to 60

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >you need 500 gb space to play my videogame + latest graphic card NSEETHIA GeCuck 9999 + proprietary OS to support my kernel based anti-cheat

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      shut your 20fps ass up homie

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Eh eh pong goes 2500 fps

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    That literally is true THOUGH

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    you actually need 6 trillions fps

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >input lag doesn't matter, you can't even react that fast

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I have 120p without glasses

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Same, but I have antialiasing to 128x so i don't see no pixels
      Still looksclike shit though.

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    theny why does 1080p at 240FPS look better than 4k at 60FPS?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      because 24p is "cinematic", aka every movie you've watched in the cinema was at 24p, it has certain motion feel to it to whcih we all have gotten used to, and everything below or above that feels weird

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        240 FPS not 24 FPS, boomer.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          oh, ok, homosexual

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          but 24 x 10 is 240
          60 devided by 24 is 2.5 which is why it looks fukt

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            now it all makes sense, thanks Eyemaster!

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >have 144hz monitor
    >run it at 120 so I can have 10bit colour
    I would prefer the extra 24 frames but not at the expense of colour banding. For extra frick you points I also run Vsync because screen tearing makes me want to vomit.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I game at 120 so that I can watch a 24fps movie at the same time.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >120hz
      >vsync

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I don't care how fast the human eye sees, I'm not paying 5x as much for a graphics card that only gives me a 50% performance increase.

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I look like that and I say that.

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I own a 4090 but game at 30 fps cap to make it look more movie like. stay mad poorlets

  12. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Human eye doesn't see in fps. It sees the speed of light, then it's up for the brain to interpret it.

  13. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Reality is analog, so the human eye sees infinite FPS.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      no it doesnt. wave your hand quickly in front of your face, see how its blurry and you cant see your fingers clearly? that isnt infinite FPS

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        moron

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        That's a focus problem.

        No. A finite amount of photons hit your eye every second (estimate: 3x10^14)
        https://physics.stackexchange.com/questions/329971/how-many-photons-enter-our-eyes-per-second-when-looking-at-the-blue-sky-on-a-sun
        If we assume 1 photon per subpixel, then at 4k resolution, that's 12 million FPS.

        >then at 4k resolution, that's 12 million FPS
        This doesn't make any sense. Your retina has a resolution based on the number of photoreceptor cells in the eye. Any photon not stimulating a rod or cone might as well be invisible. And two photons stimulating the same photoreceptor at the same time isn't giving you extra information. If the video you're watching is 4K, 1080p, 480p, 240p or whatever, that doesn't change the resolution of your eye. Resolution and "frame rate" are independent.
        The "frame rate" the human eye sees at is based on how fast the photoreceptors can react to a change and transmit that change to your brain. So if a photon hits a photoreceptor, and then another photon with a different frequency hits it 1 picosecond later is the photoreceptor reacting that fast? The answer has nothing to do with the resolution of the video you're watching or game you're playing.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >Any photon not stimulating a rod or cone might as well be invisible. And two photons stimulating the same photoreceptor at the same time isn't giving you extra information.
          The human eye responds to 1 photon in 100ms. https://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/physics/Quantum/see_a_photon.html
          The human brain filters it out, so you need 9 photons per 100ms to generate a conscious response (although I suspect that individual photons still matter in terms of the "smoothness" of the signal).
          9 photons per 100ms is approximately 1 photon per second.
          However, 90% of the photons that make it to the pupil don't make it to the retina, so I need to make a factor of 10 adjustment: 3.6 million FPS at 4K resolution of genuine information.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            That's a focus problem.

            [...]
            >then at 4k resolution, that's 12 million FPS
            This doesn't make any sense. Your retina has a resolution based on the number of photoreceptor cells in the eye. Any photon not stimulating a rod or cone might as well be invisible. And two photons stimulating the same photoreceptor at the same time isn't giving you extra information. If the video you're watching is 4K, 1080p, 480p, 240p or whatever, that doesn't change the resolution of your eye. Resolution and "frame rate" are independent.
            The "frame rate" the human eye sees at is based on how fast the photoreceptors can react to a change and transmit that change to your brain. So if a photon hits a photoreceptor, and then another photon with a different frequency hits it 1 picosecond later is the photoreceptor reacting that fast? The answer has nothing to do with the resolution of the video you're watching or game you're playing.

            >9 photons per 100ms is approximately 1 photon per second.
            Clarification on the units conversion: the human eye can detect 9 photons in 100 milliseconds is equivalent to the human eye detecting an *average* of a mimimum 1 photon per second. (Think 9photons in the first 100ms, then nothing for 900ms)
            Given we are trying to estimate the minimum of human detection as a baseline, that's what we use, not a constant signal.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            What the eye can technically detect seems rather irrelevant here considering the vast majority of your field of vision is some form of hallucination made up by your brain

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      No. A finite amount of photons hit your eye every second (estimate: 3x10^14)
      https://physics.stackexchange.com/questions/329971/how-many-photons-enter-our-eyes-per-second-when-looking-at-the-blue-sky-on-a-sun
      If we assume 1 photon per subpixel, then at 4k resolution, that's 12 million FPS.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >If we assume 1 photon per subpixel
        Which isn't sensible in any way.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I guess it's more like 1 photon per pixel because a photon can have any color, so more like 36 million FPS at 4k.

  14. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    tbh I cannot see the difference between 144hz and 75 hz
    but I can definitely see the difference between 30 and 60, or even 20 and 30
    I think that it is different for each person

  15. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    i dont know what they put in school food 50Hz sine wave flickers like hell on fluorescent lights

  16. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >ctrl-f persistence of vision

  17. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    i can see in slow motion and infrared, sometimes ultraviolet but when i'm drunk

  18. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Reminder that everything you see on a CRT is literally just an optical illusion

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Reminder that LCD light is polarized aka not complete light. You could have so much fuller picture if not for polarization!
      t. audiophool

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Yes moron, but then everything would look like a huge dark blue LED light.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          How would unpolarized light make it look like an LED and change the color? Genuine question cause we can't see polarization to my knowledge and LEDs generally give off polarized light.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >LEDs generally give off polarized light
            Normally they don't (there are some weird ones that do).
            >How would unpolarized light make it look like an LED and change the color?
            It would just look white if you remove polarizing film, see pic.

            Yes moron, but then everything would look like a huge dark blue LED light.

            >Yes moron
            You shouldn't call yourself that even if it's the truth. And your signature is unneeded.

  19. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >The human eye can only see 6 million frames per 6 years.

  20. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The human eye can only see 1366x768

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      1920 x 1080 even, but in very rare cases

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        You guys are moron, we can see 60 to 130 pixel per degree.
        Even a 4k monitor is not enough when you are at a reasonable distance.
        Altough you have diminishing returns you can still tell the difference with 8k.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >reasonable distance
          Anon I'm about 2 feet away from my monitor. How reasonable is that

  21. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The human eye can see up to 144fps

  22. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Depends on the difference of frames. Imagine a dark room and then there is lightning, which illuminates the room. AI tells me lightning falsh can go as low as 100 frames per second, so it is probably at leaste 100. But I think it depends on the difference in images.

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