This books is written in such an unclear and imprecise way.

This books is written in such an unclear and imprecise way. The advice itself seems to be about applying deeply ingrained instinctual behaviours of bugman worker-drones to the activity of reading. Did anyone get any value out of this? Why is it so highly rated?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It came at a time when middle class people had the ambition to be high culture. Adler was also selling the Great Books series. I found that the book hurt my understanding more than helped it. I've never seen any auto-didact credit it as a their breakthrough book for understanding the classics.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I checked out the Kindle preview on Amazon, and I can't believe someone who writes like that wrote a book about reading.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    get gpt to make the outline for you in ebonics

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Filtered by a book about reading books

      It was written in 1940, standards for literacy were different back then
      you might have to start off with a less advanced book like "how to read" or "how to breathe" first

      >doesn't know how to read a book about how to read a book

      >People justifying reading 300 pages of drivel by insulting the people revealing that it'als drivel

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It sucks

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    This is a scam book.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      What's the scam?

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Filtered by a book about reading books

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    /lit/tards recommend this book so much that I thought I should give it a chance. Worst mistake of my life. All Adler does is edge you. I don’t know if it’s supposed to do anything else but it certainly doesn’t guide you to read intelligently in any MEANINGFUL way. Perhaps it is my fault for allowing myself to believe that a single book can help me do such.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      You jest, surely. His way of explaining is super dry, a tad verbose, sure, but to say he doesn't teach you in any meaningful way is dishonest. He teaches a way to be critical with the text, how to ask questions and observe if the text answers them, to ask if the author's arguments are clear, how to line up the text against others, etc.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        He does jest, clearly he didn't read the book well, kek.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Explain what he taught you that you didn't already know yourself.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          People keep complaining that How to Read a Book is all "common sense" and that "they already knew this stuff", but I rarely, if ever, see any evidence that people actually actively read in the sense that Adler advocates for, whether it's inspectional, analytical, or syntopical reading. At best, people might takes notes or perhaps read with some vague direction in mind, but I rarely find anybody as systematic as Adler. I think many people are too scared to read syntopically these days, actually, because they think all systems of thought are relative and thus incommensurable with each other. So it's not common sense at all.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            You have been conned. He dresses up the mundane to make it seem grand. Take syntopical reading, it's just comparitive reading. You read multiple books about a subject and compare them to reach a higher, more thorough conclusion. He changed the name from comparitive to the more esoteric, and made-up syntopical, and he goes on to speak imprecisely about it to seem like he is giving you something new, and he wants you to believe that it's not common sense. He tries to cover this up slightly by saying that syntopical reading can also be called comparitive, but this is near the end of the book and he has already hooked you in with the mysterious final level with its mysterious name. The climax of the entire book is his subsequent sales pitch for his other book named Syntopicon. He invented a word to describe the highest level of reading, which is also the name of his other product. This entire book was a bait-and-switch: you were baited in by the promise of learning techniques to get the most value out of a book, but all you got was a a sales pitch.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            If it were so mundane, then everybody would be doing it. I think you're not aware of the depth of your understanding of the art of reading compared to that of the average plebeian, or even that of a precocious yet inexperienced learner.
            >Take syntopical reading, it's just comparitive reading.
            That's also fundamentally not true. Comparative reading is comparing two, maybe a few at most, books and seeing how they relate. You don't necessarily need to understand the "plot" or the "current" that drives them, nor is it possible to know it with such a small sample size. Syntopical reading is what happens when you have both breadth and depth of material. In other words, it's the kind of reading you do when you already know something and are starting to grow that knowledge at an exponential rate.
            >and he wants you to believe that it's not common sense.
            Because it literally is not common sense! I doubt the majority of people read a book a year, let alone have a "syntopical" understanding of the Western canon, or even some favorite niche subject matter. You're being a cynical contrarian to the point where it's blinding your ability to remain coherent.
            >This entire book was a bait-and-switch: you were baited in by the promise of learning techniques to get the most value out of a book, but all you got was a a sales pitch.
            ... if it were a sales pitch, then I would have bought his book. But apparently I never did, nor did I feel compelled to, enticed to, or even aware of such a product. And even if I did buy it, so what? What even is the product?
            >https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Syntopicon
            So... an anthology of great ideas? So, kind of like Diderot's Encyclopedia with a modern twist? Anon, there are far more damaging swindles to fall for in life. At least this one would leave me far more learned than I began, if I were to fall for it. I actually kind of want to buy it now lol.

            By the way, there are two versions of the book, one which was written in 1940 and did not include syntopical reading, and one that was published in 1973. The Syntopicon was published in 1952 and was out of print by the time the 2nd edition of HTRAB was republished. So uhhh... if it was all an elaborate self-referential scam, it must have been an incredibly poorly-timed one.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >If it were so mundane, then everybody would be doing it. I think you're not aware of the depth of your understanding of the art of reading compared to that of the average plebeian, or even that of a precocious yet inexperienced learner.
            Even putting aside the awful writing, I doubt this would help any pleb.
            >>Take syntopical reading, it's just comparitive reading.
            >That's also fundamentally not true.
            Quote from the book:
            >Another name for this level might be comparative reading.
            This is just semantics. You've just described a more actualized form of comparitive reading.
            >Because it literally is not common sense! I doubt the majority of people read a book a year, let alone have a "syntopical" understanding of the Western canon, or even some favorite niche subject matter. You're being a cynical contrarian to the point where it's blinding your ability to remain coherent.
            Read a book and think about it. Read books similiar to it to understand the subject as a whole. Not common sense? Okay.
            >if it were a sales pitch, then I would have bought his book. But apparently I never did
            lol nice logic bro
            >Anon, there are far more damaging swindles to fall for in life.
            Doesn't change the fact that it's a swindle.
            >By the way, there are two versions of the book, one which was written in 1940 and did not include syntopical reading, and one that was published in 1973. The Syntopicon was published in 1952 and was out of print by the time the 2nd edition of HTRAB was republished. So uhhh... if it was all an elaborate self-referential scam, it must have been an incredibly poorly-timed one.
            First book is a scam to sell a 300 page nothingburger. It did well so they made a new one where they also shill their other product.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            https://i.imgur.com/vLD8ll2.jpeg

            >If it were so mundane, then everybody would be doing it. I think you're not aware of the depth of your understanding of the art of reading compared to that of the average plebeian, or even that of a precocious yet inexperienced learner.
            Even putting aside the awful writing, I doubt this would help any pleb.
            >>Take syntopical reading, it's just comparitive reading.
            >That's also fundamentally not true.
            Quote from the book:
            >Another name for this level might be comparative reading.
            This is just semantics. You've just described a more actualized form of comparitive reading.
            >Because it literally is not common sense! I doubt the majority of people read a book a year, let alone have a "syntopical" understanding of the Western canon, or even some favorite niche subject matter. You're being a cynical contrarian to the point where it's blinding your ability to remain coherent.
            Read a book and think about it. Read books similiar to it to understand the subject as a whole. Not common sense? Okay.
            >if it were a sales pitch, then I would have bought his book. But apparently I never did
            lol nice logic bro
            >Anon, there are far more damaging swindles to fall for in life.
            Doesn't change the fact that it's a swindle.
            >By the way, there are two versions of the book, one which was written in 1940 and did not include syntopical reading, and one that was published in 1973. The Syntopicon was published in 1952 and was out of print by the time the 2nd edition of HTRAB was republished. So uhhh... if it was all an elaborate self-referential scam, it must have been an incredibly poorly-timed one.
            First book is a scam to sell a 300 page nothingburger. It did well so they made a new one where they also shill their other product.

            >everything is a scam bro just trust me
            >im definitely not scamming you out of something valuable to make myself feel good about doing nothing
            have a nice day you illiterate cretin

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            It's easier to fool people than to convince them that they have been fooled moment.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >I was fooled into reading the Western canon and furnishing my mind with beauty for a small fee
            Wow, I sure was got huh anon :^) what a scam >:(

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            You needed a bloated essay stretched to fit 450 pages to get you to read the Western canon? Weird flex, but ok.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            What's bloated about it? Have you read it? Were you conned yourself and that's why you've warned me?

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Damn. People on lit were shilling this garbage?

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Tbh, i mostly read to have an aesthetic experience, and connect with another mind.
            All of this shit about analysing and dissecting a text seems kind of bugmanish to me. Like you can't appreciate an animal, unless it's dead and mounted on your wall.
            There you go, there's your "tiger". It's not a tiger, is it? It's not anything anymore. You ruined it.

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I pushed myself to finish this, and I hated it almost the entire way through. It made me feel suicidal and nearly killed any interested I had in reading. However, it did sorta "expand" my understanding of logic, forming an argument, rationalization, etc. Sorta felt like reading a philosophy book written for high schoolers in a subject that I had no interest in. But everything I've been reading since has felt easier to read.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >I pushed myself to finish this, and I hated it almost the entire way through. It made me feel suicidal and nearly killed any interested I had in reading. However, it did sorta "expand" my understanding of logic, forming an argument, rationalization, etc. Sorta felt like reading a philosophy book written for high schoolers in a subject that I had no interest in. But everything I've been reading since has felt easier to read.
      Pretty much this , as others have mentioned it is written so poorly though. A lot of it is common sense and Greek shill. Could see it helping a low iq reader.

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It's pretty clear, and most of what it says is correct. I didn't get much from it that I didn't already know, but there was one part where it said words to the effect of "Reading many great books doesn't guarantee that you'll be well read" or "you can be more well read having read just one book in your life". That tied things together nicely. I guess like with most ideas, it only makes sense if you've already thought it before. Synoptic reading is a good idea btw.

    As an aside, "the elements of style" is, counterintuitively, a great book for understanding how to read.

  10. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I've just started it. Hopefully I haven't been meme'd.

    I enjoy reading but don't know how to get the most out of it. Does anyone have other suggestions if this one turns out to be shite?

  11. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    81 millennial no scope
    you will have ZERO REGRETS

  12. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It was written in 1940, standards for literacy were different back then
    you might have to start off with a less advanced book like "how to read" or "how to breathe" first

  13. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It's seems like he was trying to fit a minimum word requirement while writing this book.

  14. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    There is no point in reading this book when we can just go on google or youtube and type in "how to properly read a book", you are going to find better stuff that way.

  15. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I doubt that anyone on IQfy has actually read this slop.

  16. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >If I talk in a verbose way, it will give me the ethos necessary to look like I know what I'm talking about

  17. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The most important is to being able to recall ,if you read a book but forgot what an other author you've read have said on the same subject ,you won't be able to confront/conciliate perspectives of those authors especially when you're in a active thinking moment.
    Also cross reading or at least take a commonplace book with an index where you can easily switch between quotes you got on a same topic.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >commonplace book
      You fell for the newest productivity fad?

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        it's basically just writing down quotes in a single book ,probably something writers do since ancient greeks.
        But yeah thats new.

  18. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >doesn't know how to read a book about how to read a book

  19. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The author of this book Mortimer J. Adler personally invited Hitler to take over America in one of his speeches. He also said you could deduce a priori the metaphysical impossibility of the biological theory of evolution.

  20. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    more important is how to remember a book, how am I supposed to understand a text if I can't recall what I read...where are the best tips for that?

  21. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    People who recommend this book never tell you anything from it because there is nothing to tell. It's 300 pages of written masturbation.

  22. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    how were zoomers taught to read? write 2at least 2 sentences and use at least 2 quotes from the text to back up whatever you want to say?

  23. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Why is it so highly rated?
    Because a bunch of basement-dwelling STEM-leaning pseud homosexuals think that reading can be systemized to the end of perfect info retention. It can't you fricking autists.

    Mortimer Adler can suck my dick. I will not be skimming the table of contents or index, reading everything twice or playing his other dumbfrick games with books. Just read attentively and take notes. That has been enough for nearly every important philosopher and writer ever.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      What games does it tell you to play?

  24. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Well frick me, the summer truly is in full swing.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      No argument? Fitting.

  25. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    should have read "How to Read "How to Read a Book"" first.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Could you be any more original?

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        find me one other instance of someone making the same joke.

  26. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Another OP filtered by a book on how to read books. Many such cases.

    My biggest problem with Adler are his undisclosed sources and influences, e.g. Schopenhauer's On Reading and Books or Descartes' remarks about (not) arguing with the author. Adler didn't invent anything, he just compiled these scattered insights and incorporated them into a system. That system isn't even the meat of the book (like all the Adler "summaries" made by midwits would have you believe). His questionable ideas about what education is supposed to be aren't the point either. The main takeaway are the insights about reading that informed his system: all the pitfalls of evaluating a written argument and how to avoid them.

    Ironically, if you aren't a very good reader, you'll fail to extract these lessons and get bogged down in all the other material. So let me cut you some slack, in case you really tried reading Adler in order to learn something.

    Here's the most important lesson: proper reading is hard. When you read properly, you exert deliberate effort to avoid projecting your own thoughts onto the text. You strain to put the emphasis where the author intended it, not where you would want it. You constantly force yourself to suspend judgement, so you don't understand the text "too quickly", meaning before you have all the information necessary to understand it. Fail do do all that and you'll read something completely different that what is written. If you think that this doesn't apply to you because you understand everything you read effortlessly, you're just getting filtered left and right without realizing it. In order to really learn this lesson you have to go over something you once failed to understand and notice all the mistakes you made. That's an important milestone in a reader's life: realizing that you cannot fricking read as well as you thought.

    So unironically read Adler again, but read him properly this time. Seriously, it will blow your fricking mind. While you're at it, notice that Adler is actually trying to teach you how to avoid making such mistakes - you just failed to listen.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      The emperor has no clothes.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I appreciate you for breaking up your text into paragraphs. Many anons don't and it's fricking annoying to read.

  27. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    https://chicorybeam.blot.im/2

  28. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    How many people actually read the western canon? Like, how many people have actually read The Great Books of the Western World all the way through?

  29. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Any recommendations for books about reading?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      how to read a book by mortimer adler
      the intellectual life by AG sertaillges

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