this is what boomers were asked during their coding interviews

this is what boomers were asked during their coding interviews

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    boomers weren't even asked that

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      They told them they pulled themselves up by their bootstraps and them gave them a firm handshake.
      40 years later they retired knowing just as much at their interview as they did at their retirement party.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      A boomer (on the young side of the generation) family member of mine worked in a mail room at a major US company as a letter sorter. They noticed that he did a good job and didn't slack off and so they asked him if he wanted to move up and start loading tape decks onto the PDP-11s. From there, they figured eh, why not train him to program since he works on the machines anyways.

      He just retired after like 40 years of work as a programmer with no academic instruction in computers whatsoever and no college degree.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        That world is dead and soon also the current one.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        That world is dead and soon also the current one.

        Dont companies like Tesla and Google value portfolio over degrees?

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          My point is moreso that he didn't need to learn on his own, didn't need to bootcamp, didn't need to pay for college. He didn't know a lick of programming. The company he worked for trained HIM because they recognized that he wasn't a moron.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Yeah but "portfolio" here means massive github projects with thousands of users, plus half a dozen rounds of interviews where you have to give presentations etc etc

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Kek boomers didn't have coding interviews they were asked for their degree and had regular normal interviews.

          They value cheap Indian labor who they can convince to work 60 hours a week otherwise they'll get kicked out of the country. I have no clue, never worked at those companies but that's what I say. Google has the added touch of making extremely low quality products.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >America before being prostituted out
        I wish I could have seen it.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        They were in the right place at the right time. That's life.
        Nowadays, there's an entire generation of entitled morons who feel like they deserve the fancy career with the high salary just because they went through the CS conveyer belt.
        Those college degrees are meant to scale up production of engineers, thus lowering per unit cost. Previously, you needed luck/passion/white skin but now any moron can order their 9 to 5 like a Big Mac on their senior year of highschool. That's why shit is getting outsourced to India so easily, because it's actually low skill labor anyone with a pulse can do.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >if you want to survive, you are ... ENTITLED!!!1
          reddit is that way, homosexual

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      This. You just give the boss a firm handshake and you get the job. It's a simple as that. Kids these days and their anxiety.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      In the 90's they'd invite you in and you'd just talk about software, design patterns, etc.
      That was up through the 2000s, sometime in the early 2010s this bullshit started.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        The industry got flooded with pajeets and other people trying to 'fake it until you make it.' An interviewer had the idea to make candidates solve a simple coding challenge during the interview, hence FizzBuzz. He eliminated something like 90% of candidates that way. And he published it on his blog.

        That led to an arms race. Pajeets memorize FizzBuzz, interviewers present more difficult challenges, etc. Now it's completely fricking ridiculous with coding challenges that have nothing to do with the job and pajeets spending so much time memorizing leetcode solutions that they could have actually become competent engineers if they had used the time for that instead. Oh, and this was all made worse by Google embracing the meme and everyone wants to be Google. But then Google dropped it because...surprise...solving leetcode puzzles doesn't tell you if someone is going to be a good fit for the job.

        Filtering fakes with FizzBuzz is clever until everyone memorizes FizzBuzz. But the harder challenges are just ridiculous because a competent engineer can fail missing some stupid trick, or forgetting some math formula. While a fake passes via memorization. They also put someone on the spot when successful software engineering is a lot of patience, R&D, and constant self learning.

        tl;dr - I wish I had been a boomer.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          It's hard to memorize truly unique coding challenges that aren't just recycled from the most popular ones on Leetcode. It's also incredibly easy to ask additional questions and throw curveballs to see if the candidate truly knows how to solve the problem.

          Interviewers are just lazy and not testing properly. Leetcode is fine, but it shouldn't be used by interviewers that can't solve the problems themselves on their own.
          It's always used as a crutch by bad interviewers who lack the basic social IQ to feel out candidates and bring out their strengths/weaknesses properly. Telling them to not use Leetcode won't solve the fundamental problem.

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    le hecking fizzbuzz

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    why are the first 3 into necessary? aren't they already strings?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      no, they're string slices with static lifetime: &'static str

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      i think its a way to make the copy explicit

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        not a copy so much as a heap allocation, Strings are dynamically allocated buffers

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          yeah allocation and copy

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            it's not a copy, that has a distinct meaning

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            I was asked this during my coding interview

            The string contents are copied, this is a normal thing to say
            If you say clone then I think Clone but if you say copied I don't automatically assume Copy

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >The string contents are copied, this is a normal thing to say
            no, the normal thing to say is an owned version of the &str is created resulting in a String. this is generally conducted by cloning the contents. copy would very specifically be referring to Copy types

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            In common cross-language parlance "copy" has a broad meaning and IME people continue to use it just like that in addition to meaning Copy specifically. Shame to overload it but what can you do
            The stdlib doesn't stick to this: https://doc.rust-lang.org/std/?search=copy
            std::ptr::copy_nonoverlapping would be a sensible tool to implement this operation

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            the stdlib does stick to it. those are bitwise copies, i don't know what your point is

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            It applies to all types (not just Copy types) and std::io::copy and std::fs::copy have even less to do with std::marker::Copy
            It's perfectly acceptable to use the word informally

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            strong disagree but pointless to argue since you're wrong

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Are you fricking autistic?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Rust will never not be fricking hilarious.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >you need a heap allocation for a compile-time constant string
          Epic

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Rust makes a distinction between compile time constant string and runtime determined string.
            The i.to_string() cannot be determined in compile time, hence the other 3 cases also need to be runtime determined strings.
            Being a low level language, Rust just makes it explicit.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >Being a low level language, Rust just makes it explicit.
            With a GC you actually can represent both as the exact same type internally, it's not merely about explicitness (though it is about low levelness)

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            This has nothing to do with garbage collection.
            How will you know the length of the i.to_string() in compile time? Allocate the length of i32::MAX every time? That sounds unoptimal.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            You could return an immortal literal string (without copying it) and a dynamically created string using the exact same type. You wouldn't even need a Cow-like system

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            The growability is a bit of a red herring, you could use Box<str> for this

            [...]
            Are you telling me that std::fs::copy relates to std::marker::Copy? I'm not sure I even understand your position any more

            Box<str> are also heap allocated. But I'd love for you to post the code.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Call (Box/String)::leak to get a &str, now you can return that without making a copy for the literal case. Big downside of course is that you leak memory, but a GC would solve that. (Maybe literally this strategy would actually work alright if you linked in boehm instead of the standard malloc.)
            So it's not just explicitness, managed languages can actually use a different strategy at runtime.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            This has nothing to do with garbage collection.
            How will you know the length of the i.to_string() in compile time? Allocate the length of i32::MAX every time? That sounds unoptimal.

            Rust is so blackpill tier

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >requesting a heap-allocated type results in a heap allocation
            Whos

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            strings are heap allocated and there's no SSO by default. you don't need to return a string, they could drop the into and return the &str

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >function says it returns a heap-allocated string
            >it returns a heap-allocated string
            WOW

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            This function could just as easily have returned a &'static str.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            IQfy character limit is 2000. There are a little less than 1200 in that post.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Was meant to reply to

            Did you max out the post character limit? ;3

            I misclicked.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Was meant to reply to
            [...]
            I misclicked.

            Ah, thanks for the response. It sure looked like it exceeded.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      because it is a shit language

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        well, how does it work in your language?

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          you return a pointer to the constant string stored in .rodata, if the user needs to make a copy, they can make it themselves.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            and hwhat if the string is not constant, as it is the case here?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            then you change the return type to std::string and it will be implicitly converted without having to add more noise

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >implicitly converted
            i thought you guys hated when javascript did that. But now suddenly it's ok?
            Nah frick that
            if you really want to use a static string in OP's code, you can change return type to Option<String, str>

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            nobody ever complained about implicitly converting one type of string to another slightly different type of string. unintuitive conversions are simply marked as explicit.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            i complain about it. every allocation and conversion should be explicit

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            if you truly care about allocations you would never write this code in the first place. this function should simply return null for the number case.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            i agree, the premise is flawed

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            I like how this is actually more readable than using if/else. This is by the way why I define a cond! macro, try:

            cond!{
            i % 15 == 0 => "FizzBuzz".into(),
            i % 3 == 0 => "Fizz".into(),
            i % 3 == 0 => "Buzz".into(),
            true => i.to_String(),
            }

            Instead.

            “if else if” is so hard to read compared to this.

            Option doesn't do that.
            Anyway, Cow<'static, str> isn't bad here to return I feel.

            then you change the return type to std::string and it will be implicitly converted without having to add more noise

            So basically the issue is purely having to explicitly add .into() and nothing more?

            I think “.into()” could be common enough that it can have some sugar like “@” but it's fine for it to be explicit.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            then your function wouldn't be doing the same thing as the op

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    print("n".join(["FizzBuzz"[i%~2&4:12&8+i%~4] or str(i) for i in range(100)]))

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    fizzbuzz technology has advanced a great deal over the years

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      When you try to get a summer job in Athens.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      (defun Black person (n)
      (loop for i from 1 to n do
      (cond
      ((and (= (mod i 3) 0) (= (mod i 5) 0)) (format t "Black person~%"))
      ((= (mod i 3) 0) (format t "Nig~%"))
      ((= (mod i 5) 0) (format t "Ger~%"))
      (t (format t "~d~%" i*~~))

      (defun main ()
      (fizzbuzz 100))

      (main)

      >daily fizzbuzz thread
      (do ((i 1 (1+ i*~~ ((eql i 101))
      (or (some #'identity
      (list (and (zerop (mod i 3)) (princ "Fizz"))
      (and (zerop (mod i 5)) (princ "Buzz"*~~)
      (princ i))
      (terpri))

      (format t "~{~[FizzBuzz~*~;Buzz~*~;Fizz~*~;~a~]~%~}"
      (do* ((c 1 (1+ c))
      (f 3 (+ (signum (mod c 3)) (ash (signum (mod c 5)) 1*~~
      (r (list c f) (cons c (cons f r*~~)
      ((>= c 100) (nreverse r*~~)

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Why would you use a match statement for that

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    static const char* t[][2] = {{"FizzBuzzn","Fizzn"},{"Buzzn","%dn"}};
    for (int i = 1; i <= 100; ++i) printf(t[i%3>0][i%5>0], i);

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    no. typically you would be asked to render a triangle on the screen and rotate it. fizzbuzz is actually zoomie filter.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      yeah right, I can make triangles. Where the frick are the companies asking triangle questions

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >i128
    CPUs are now 128 bits??

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >integer size == pointer size
      moron alert

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Not his fault. C has brainrotted a whole generation of programmers.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >integer size == pointer size
          moron alert

          >i128
          CPUs are now 128 bits??

          Wtf does this mean

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Do the needful sir
    void main() {
    System.out.println(range(1, 100).boxed().map(number -> switch (number) {
    case Integer i when i % 15 == 0 -> "Fizzbuzz";
    case Integer i when i % 5 == 0 -> "Fizz";
    case Integer i when i % 3 == 0 -> "Buzz";
    default -> String.valueOf(number);
    }).collect(joining("n"*~~;
    }

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Not entreprise-grade enough

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Love Java, simple as.

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    converting a string into a string.. based trannies

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      string literal into growable string*

      And what's wrong with it? Other languages do the same thing as well.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        can't the coompiler do that for you? shouldnt it work like in other languages out fo the box, but when you need fine tuning u use the low level classes

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          It's a matter of language design. Rust is primarily a lower level language. To get a growable string you pass a string literal into a constructor
          >String::from("Fizz")
          If you as a language designer decide that all strings should be growable by default, you are missing an optimization opportunity, meaning in cases where you simply want a string literal, you are depending on your optimizer to do some magic and create nothing but a literal under the hood. This is a complex task.

          Complexity is like an entropy, it either lies under the hood, or spills out in the userspace. Finding a balance is the real work of engineers.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            The growability is a bit of a red herring, you could use Box<str> for this

            strong disagree but pointless to argue since you're wrong

            Are you telling me that std::fs::copy relates to std::marker::Copy? I'm not sure I even understand your position any more

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            no, my point was that you wouldn't refer to the original thing as a copy like a copy constructor

  12. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    still waiting for the most absurdly pajeet engineered monstrosity of a fizzbuzz solution to end the meme of memes

  13. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >ifs in match
    Yikes.
    fn fizzbuzz(i: i128) -> String {
    match (i % 3, i % 5) {
    (0, 0) => "FizzBuzz".into(),
    (0, _) => "Fizz".into(),
    (_, 0) => "Buzz".into(),
    _ => i.to_string(),
    }
    }

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      sexy

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      fn fizzbuzz(i: i128) -> String {
      let fizz_condition = |n| n % 3 == 0;
      let buzz_condition = |n| n % 5 == 0;

      let fizz = if fizz_condition(i) {
      let mut f = String::new();
      f.push('F');
      f.push('i');
      f.push('z');
      f.push('z');
      f
      } else {
      String::new()
      };

      let buzz = if buzz_condition(i) {
      let mut b = String::new();
      b.push('B');
      b.push('u');
      b.push('z');
      b.push('z');
      b
      } else {
      String::new()
      };

      let mut result = String::new();
      result.push_str(&fizz);
      result.push_str(&buzz);

      if result.is_empty() {
      let mut digits = Vec::new();
      let mut n = i;
      while n > 0 {
      let digit = (n % 10) as u8;
      let ascii_digit = match digit {
      0 => b'0',
      1 => b'1',
      2 => b'2',
      3 => b'3',
      4 => b'4',
      5 => b'5',
      6 => b'6',
      7 => b'7',
      8 => b'8',
      9 => b'9',
      _ => unreachable!(),
      };
      digits.push(ascii_digit);
      n /= 10;
      }

      digits.reverse();

      let mut string_digits = Vec::new();
      for digit in digits {
      string_digits.push(digit as char);
      }

      result = string_digits.into_iter().collect();
      }

      result
      }

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        I like this very much. How do I test this code in the most optimal way?

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          1. Write a separate function that generates all numbers from 1 to a given limit, one by one, and stores them in a vector.

          2. Create another function that takes the vector of numbers and applies the FizzBuzz function to each number, storing the results in a new vector.

          3. Implement a function that compares the resulting vector with the expected output by iterating over each element individually and comparing them using nested if statements.

          4. Write a main function that generates a large number of test cases, each with a different limit, and calls the functions in steps 1-3 for each test case.

          5. Run the main function and wait patiently for the results, as it may take a considerable amount of time due to the inefficient approach.

          6. If any test case fails, debug the code by adding print statements at every line to track the program's flow and variable values.

          Repeat steps 1-6 for each modification you make to the FizzBuzz function, ensuring that you test it thoroughly and inefficiently.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            This is really helpful, and inspiring. I especially want to add flourishes to step 4 & 6. Thank you.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      thanks for posting that. learning rust rn in my free time and my favorite part about the lang is its expressiveness

  14. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >boomers
    >fizzbuzz
    Boomers put a man on the moon and they solved complex math with a slide ruler faster than you can type in chatgpt.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Calm down and take your meds, boomer. You are deprecated.

  15. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >DoubleDouble on a Fizzbuzz
    I'd unironically fail you for that. Not understanding that your function will never terminate in your lifetime if you run that code on an integer anywhere near 2^128 is enough to mark you as pajeet.

  16. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Did an interview on Tuesday. They asked me to re-implement a python iterator and basically just wanted me to have a lot of esoteric python knowledge. I wish I just got a normal leetcode problem.

    I ended up implementing it but was still rejected because during the interview I said "I haven't used lambdas that often".

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Yeah i have come across that mentality aswell, asking about “pythonic” features like list comprehension map lambdas, as if knowing these features somehow matters and its not something you can google in 5 seconds if you dont remember the syntax, really? Thats what separates a good developer from a bad one?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        It's what lets them claim there's no one available with the required skills to work for them so they must be allowed to import someone from the other side of the planet.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Yeah FR, frick that noise.

  17. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    It was even cooler it was more like this
    >What is a compiler?
    >[answer in the ballpark]
    >You're in

  18. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    (defun Black person (n)
    (loop for i from 1 to n do
    (cond
    ((and (= (mod i 3) 0) (= (mod i 5) 0)) (format t "Black person~%"))
    ((= (mod i 3) 0) (format t "Nig~%"))
    ((= (mod i 5) 0) (format t "Ger~%"))
    (t (format t "~d~%" i*~~))

    (defun main ()
    (fizzbuzz 100))

    (main)

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      fizzbuzz is undefined.

  19. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    nah, here's what casey had to do for an internship at michaelsoft

  20. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    You can turn this thing on? You're hired as a manager! Also here's a blowjob GLUG GLUG GLUG GLUG ah yeah daddy GLUG GLUG

  21. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I can change the TV from HDMI 1 to HDMI 2. I'm practically a wizard, hire me.

  22. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Interviews usually go like this:
    >yes hello we are working on this thing and we're looking for someone to help with this specific or general thing
    >hello ah yes I've worked with X Y and Z and i really enjoy solving problems
    >that sounds good, let us ask a few questions related to aforementioned subject matter
    >absolutely and here are my answers
    >well that sounds great hm yes we will need to confer and get back to you
    >great talk to you then
    >hello again when can you start
    At no point is there a fizz nor a buzz and especially never a fizzbuzz.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      This should be the norm for most jobs. If you filter cheats (bootcampers, Indians) it does the job pretty well. There is little relation between if someone can do the leetcode problems well and perform the job.

  23. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    and during covid you could get a job even without a code interview. Not that code interviews even work, but it all depends on the economy: good eco: its easy as hell, bad eco: you need to lie, cheat and still face 3 rounds of hardcore shit not related to any task you will do.

  24. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    BOOMERS LITERALLY HAD FRIENDS THAT LANDED THEM JOBS. You moron.

  25. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    what the frick if the point of a match statement if you're gonna fricking use an if statement to evaluate the case?

  26. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    #define FIZZBUZZ(n)
    ((n % 3 == 0) ? "Fizz" : "") << ((n % 5 == 0) ? "Buzz" : "") << ((n % 3 != 0 && n % 5 != 0) ? n : "")

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      #define FIZZBUZZ(i) ((i % 3 == 0) && (i % 5 == 0) ? "FizzBuzz" : (i % 3 == 0 ? "Fizz" : (i % 5 == 0 ? "Buzz" : to_string(i*~~)

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >to_string
        Nice try cnile, you will never be a code golfer

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      where's the rest of it

  27. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    nani sore
    I'm studying for web dev with java should I get to the point of knowing that's happening there bc looks like fricking chinese LMAO

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >web dev
      >java
      I see you enjoyed the Brendan Eich thread the other day.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        the what?

  28. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >amusing Fizzbuzz autism thread turns into just another stealth Rust troony shill thread

    I hate what this board has become so fricking much. Every day, with you subhumans, it's the same nonstop threads.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >le heckin trannies!
      frick off, election tourist

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Frick off back to preddit, you projecting troon freak.
        You will never be a woman.
        You will always be an ugly incel loser pervert freak in a dress.
        People around you gag at your presence behind your back.
        The kids laugh at you because you're a man in a dress.
        No woman wakes up and tries to be a woman. They just are.
        Your mother misses you. Your father wants you to have a nice day so he can say his son is dead.
        Just do the right thing and have a nice day. It's easier for everyone.
        Maybe you'll respawn as the "girl" you always wanted to be.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Ah yes, definitely the rant of a mentally stable person.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >says the man who chopped off his genitals and wears a dress in public

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      They don’t have jobs what else are they supposed to do?

  29. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    section .data
    fizzMsg db 'Fizz', 0
    buzzMsg db 'Buzz', 0
    fizzBuzzMsg db 'FizzBuzz', 0
    fmt db '%d', 10, 0

    section .text
    global _start

    _start:
    mov ecx, 1 ; Initialize counter (ecx = 1)

    loop_start:
    cmp ecx, 101 ; Check if counter reached 101 (loop termination condition)
    je end_program ; If so, end the program

    ; Check for FizzBuzz condition
    mov eax, ecx
    mov edx, 0
    mov ebx, 3
    div ebx
    test edx, edx
    jz is_fizz

    mov eax, ecx
    mov edx, 0
    mov ebx, 5
    div ebx
    test edx, edx
    jz is_buzz

    ; Print the number if not Fizz or Buzz
    mov eax, ecx
    mov edi, fmt
    call printf
    jmp next_iteration

    is_fizz:
    ; Print 'Fizz' if divisible by 3
    mov edi, fizzMsg
    call printf
    jmp next_iteration

    is_buzz:
    ; Print 'Buzz' if divisible by 5
    mov edi, buzzMsg
    call printf
    jmp next_iteration

    next_iteration:
    inc ecx ; Increment counter
    jmp loop_start ; Continue looping

    end_program:
    ; Exit the program
    mov eax, 1 ; syscall number for exit
    xor ebx, ebx ; Exit status 0
    int 0x80 ; Perform syscall

    ; printf function
    printf:
    push ecx
    push edx
    push eax
    push edi

    mov eax, 4 ; syscall number for write
    mov ebx, 1 ; File descriptor 1 (stdout)
    mov edx, 4 ; Length of the string
    int 0x80 ; Perform syscall

    pop edi
    pop eax
    pop edx
    pop ecx
    ret

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      fun

  30. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    What are zoomers asked during their interviews? I've only ever gotten jobs through networking

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      https://leetcode.com/problems/spiral-matrix/description/

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        https://leetcode.com/problems/swim-in-rising-water/description/

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        https://leetcode.com/problems/swim-in-rising-water/description/

        It's amazing to me that there are people that can program like this yet struggle to get jobs, meanwhile I have to double check basic syntax constantly and no one has ever given me negative feedback between 3 different companies, 1 of which was FAANG

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I accidentally applied for a programming job (had "engineer" in the title) and there was a test where you had to make a function that got two words like "Black person" "GINGER" and then you had to return a list of strings for how to flip 2 characters a couple times to turn one word into the other. Like
      "GINGER"
      "GNIGER"
      "NGIGER"
      "Black person"

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        That's just a basic edit distance problem, something you should have learned in freshman intro to algorithms.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          I never learned that. They only taught me useless shit like A* pathfinding and reverse engineering with IDA.

  31. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I got asked how to add items to a list in VB.NET
    lmao
    fortune 5 btw

  32. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    // Function to create an array of numbers within a specified range
    const createNumberArrayWithRange = (startNumber, endNumber) => {
    // Use Array.from() to create an array with specified length and values
    return Array.from({length: endNumber - startNumber + 1}, (_, index) => {
    // Add the current index to the starting number to generate the array
    return index + startNumber;
    });
    }; // Close createNumberArrayWithRange function

    // Function to check if a number is divisible by a given divisor
    const checkIfNumberIsDivisibleByGivenDivisor = (number, divisor) => {
    // Return true if the number is divisible by the divisor, otherwise false
    return number % divisor === 0;
    }; // Close checkIfNumberIsDivisibleByGivenDivisor function

    // Function to apply FizzBuzz logic to a given number
    const applyFizzBuzzLogic = (number) => {
    // Initialize an empty string to store the result
    let result = '';
    // Check if the number is divisible by 3
    if (checkIfNumberIsDivisibleByGivenDivisor(number, 3)) {
    // Append 'Fizz' to the result if the number is divisible by 3
    result += 'Fizz';
    }
    // Check if the number is divisible by 5
    if (checkIfNumberIsDivisibleByGivenDivisor(number, 5)) {
    // Append 'Buzz' to the result if the number is divisible by 5
    result += 'Buzz';
    }
    // If the result is still an empty string, convert the number to a string and return
    return result || number.toString();
    }; // Close applyFizzBuzzLogic function

    // Generate a list of numbers from 1 to 100
    const generateNumberList = createNumberArrayWithRange(1, 100);

    // Iterate through each number in the generated list
    generateNumberList.forEach((individualNumber) => {
    // Apply FizzBuzz logic to each number and log the result to the console
    console.log(applyFizzBuzzLogic(individualNumber));
    }); // Close forEach loop and the script

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Did you max out the post character limit? ;3

  33. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Can FizzBuzz be constexpr?

  34. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Another deranged 'Rustaceans' attempt to make everything they touch 'safe' for toddlers ('fixing' C edition, attempt number 6 billion, still a failure ((but maybe one day.*~~ The poor deluded Rust user tries earnestly to spread its psychical compulsions, much like a Christian trying to 'save' everyone from eternal damnation in hell, adherents of 'safe' require ritualistic sacrifice by child-locking all software. What we get in response is the destruction of natures beauty, the elegance of the algorithm laid bare in its simplicity. For to add anything extra to C is to misunderstand it, warp it, and undo everything that makes C great. And in darkness we will have a new C, a half-C, a C that twists the mind of everyone who uses it, cursing them to a life of sadness and broken promises. But all of this could be avoided. Just. Write. Correct. Code. Stick yer 'safe' software and rube goldberg machine, escher stairway, hellscape up ur fricking azz, my dude.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      9 out of 10 programmers are morons. You can't eliminate morons from your codebase, so you have to give them languages that are difficult to frick up. Incidentally, you are among the 9.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Rust doesn't prevent you from writing incorrect code. It prevents a subset of incorrect code from being written. And the trade-off for such is having to write code that looks like TOTAL FRICKING DOG SHIT. Imagine you go to the doctor with a deep gash in your leg and the doctor responds by amputating it. Would you call that a solution? Rust does. What the frick is the point if you can't write simple, elegant software with the resulting language? Yep, the patient is dead jim, but here's ur prize, 'dahh memorahy is dahh safee' you drool. Well, thumbs up, who gives a frick.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >It prevents a subset of incorrect code from being written
          Yeah, and it turns out that subset is big enough that corporations are willing to throw a frickton of money at Rust's development just so they can get their own programmers to use it.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            big corpos will throw money at any trend

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          It also prevents an extremely large subset of correct code from being written, which is a mortal sin.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        9/10 is very generous in current year, its at least 95/100

  35. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >limiting input to 128 bits
    ngmi

  36. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    my first interview process (~2005)
    >take-home coding project
    - code a Scorched Earth-style game
    >some interview questions
    - how to tell if a set of connected segments form a convex object
    - basic physics stuff (can't remember exactly; I was studying physics at college back then so it was just a formality)
    - some C++ questions, like differences between pointers and references etc.
    the job payed ~$400 a month (3rd world country). yep, us boomers were spoiled.
    t. 40yo boomer

  37. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I've never been asked anything relating to algorithms. The hardest ones I've gotten were small take home exercise s that take like 3-4 hours tops (build a small fullstack service and dockerize it).

  38. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    .data
    fiz: .asciiz "Fizz"
    buz: .asciiz "Buzz"
    nl: .asciiz "n"
    .text
    main:
    li $t0, 1
    li $t7 101
    li $t3 3
    li $t5 5
    li $t4 1
    li $v0 4

    Loop: beq $t0 $t7 End
    div $t0 $t3
    mfhi $t2
    beqz $t2 Fizz

    N1: div $t0 $t5
    mfhi $t2
    beqz $t2 Buzz

    N2: beqz $t4 N3
    li $v0 1
    move $a0 $t0
    syscall
    li $v0 4

    N3: addi $t0 $t0 1
    la $a0 nl
    syscall
    li $t4 1
    j Loop

    Fizz:
    la $a0 fiz
    syscall
    li $t4 0
    j N1
    Buzz:
    la $a0 buz
    syscall
    li $t4 0
    j N2
    End:
    li $v0 10
    syscall

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Is this drupal? Fortran? SOmething 50+ years old used in banking? I am getting that vibe.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        It's MIPS assembly, lil zoomie

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        They don't make you frick around with MIPS in compsci degrees in your country? That's first year stuff here

  39. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Jumping through code hoops didn't start until the market was flooded with poos with flimsy degrees. Before 2010, I was never asked to live code anything and most tech questions were very general in nature. Sometimes an interviewer might ask something like the seven balls question but in general, they mostly wanted to know about your past experience and assumed you weren't lying. It worked fine when the labor market was mostly white guys.

  40. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    HR Black folk expect you to come up with a very exotic solution for FizzBuzz while the production code expected by your manager once hired will be closer to a simple if/else structure, because an easy to read code is more maintainable thus cheaper in the long run.
    If you're in C++ the compiler will expect that same if/else shit since compiler optimizations are more efficient on moronic code than manual tricks.

    Bootcampers ruined the trade.

  41. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I interviewed for a big defence contractor a while back and this was my coding question. I know bootcamp codemonkeys are moronic but seriously, I have *years* of C experience and I got the job based off my l33t fibonacci sk1llz.

  42. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Worst interview I had was I got interrogated by 4 "senior" developers with gotcha questions for like 20 minutes before being shoved out the door.

    Best one was I was told to do a supervised coding exercise and I was allowed to use Google and StackOverflow.

    It's weird how certain interviews are purposely setup to fail from the beginning, and how others just flow so easy.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >It's weird how certain interviews are purposely setup to fail from the beginning, and how others just flow so easy.
      Not when you realize the ones that set you up to fail are looking for an excuse to hire H1B. Or a friend.

      My worst interview:
      >do this obscure thing no one remembers and you can't look it up which is what everyone would do because it's fricking obscure
      My best...if you can call it an interview because it was email back and forth
      >your job posting is unsolvable without a supercomputer
      >"we've had dozens of applicants and no one else has noticed this. here are the real specs and time constraints, can you do it?"
      >write some test code and reply: yes, i believe so
      >"when can you start?"

  43. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    but can you do this?

  44. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    i would never hire anyone who can't figure that you don't need a case for mod 15.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      He spent all his meat cycles just figuring out where the various .into() should go, please understand.

  45. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    It's not about what you know anymore, it's about what you are.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      so just fricking lie if it’s so important to you. if ur yt just muster up the thickest dominican accent you can in the interview, they literally cannot say shit or THEY get fired. bottoms up esé

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        why not just spell out white instead of using the abbreviation for youtube

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          because it’s funny.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          underage tiktokers

  46. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >daily fizzbuzz thread
    (do ((i 1 (1+ i*~~ ((eql i 101))
    (or (some #'identity
    (list (and (zerop (mod i 3)) (princ "Fizz"))
    (and (zerop (mod i 5)) (princ "Buzz"*~~)
    (princ i))
    (terpri))

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      (format t "~{~[FizzBuzz~*~;Buzz~*~;Fizz~*~;~a~]~%~}"
      (do* ((c 1 (1+ c))
      (f 3 (+ (signum (mod c 3)) (ash (signum (mod c 5)) 1*~~
      (r (list c f) (cons c (cons f r*~~)
      ((>= c 100) (nreverse r*~~)

  47. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    *ahem*

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      god-forsaken language

  48. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    #include <cstdio>
    #include <cstdint>

    int main()
    {
    for(size_t i = 1; i < 50; ++i) printf("%zunFizznBuzznFizzBuzzn" + ~~*0x1241843 >> ((i % 15) * 2)) & 0b11) * 8), i);
    }

    .LC0:
    .string "%zun"
    .string ""
    .string ""
    .string ""
    .string "Fizzn"
    .string ""
    .string ""
    .string "Buzzn"
    .string ""
    .string ""
    .string "FizzBuzzn"
    main:
    push r12
    mov r12d, 1
    push rbx
    mov ebx, 15
    push rcx
    .L2:
    mov rax, r12
    xor edx, edx
    mov edi, 19142723
    mov rsi, r12
    div rbx
    inc r12
    xor eax, eax
    lea rcx, [rdx+rdx]
    sar edi, cl
    sal rdi, 3
    and edi, 24
    add rdi, OFFSET FLAT:.LC0
    call printf
    cmp r12, 50
    jne .L2
    pop rdx
    xor eax, eax
    pop rbx
    pop r12
    ret

  49. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Implying that 90% of code jobs require you to write code harder than fizzbuzz
    Then explain why the industry is filled with jeets.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      that 90% of code jobs require you to write code harder than fizzbuzz
      >Then explain why the industry is filled with jeets.
      Stackoverflow, jeets helping jeets, and boomers who don't care about quality even after it has bitten them right in the ass.

  50. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Yes, when they still employed people for programming jobs back in boomer times they asked these kind of kind of questions during the interviews.

  51. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I tend to agree with the people saying it has gotten harder over time.
    I am not a boomer but I graduated in 2006 and wasn't asked coding questions. I got my first job because one of my classmates was an intern at a local company and they asked him if there were any programmers he recommended and I had done all that classmate's programming assignments so he recommended me. When they brought me in to 'interview' it was already made clear more or less that it was my gig to turn down. Even the resume was just a formality. Been employed there continuously through various mergers and acquisitions ever since and survived a lot of layoffs. Never even done a real job search and wouldn't know where to begin if I had to.

  52. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    #include <stdio.h>
    #include <stdlib.h>

    char* fizz_buzz(int number) {
    char* result = (char*)malloc(9 * sizeof(char));
    if (number % 3 == 0) {
    if (number % 5 == 0) {
    sprintf(result, "FizzBuzz");
    } else {
    sprintf(result, "Fizz");
    }
    } else {
    if (number % 5 == 0) {
    sprintf(result, "Buzz");
    } else {
    sprintf(result, "%d", number);
    }
    }
    return result;
    }

    void print_fizz_buzz_range(int start, int end) {
    for (int i = start; i <= end; i++) {
    char* output = fizz_buzz(i);
    printf("%sn", output);
    free(output);
    }
    }

    int main() {
    int starting_point = 1;
    int ending_point = 100;
    print_fizz_buzz_range(starting_point, ending_point);
    return 0;
    }

  53. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >"Fizz".into
    >primitives have member functions
    lmao what garbo language is that

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      theres literally nothing wrong with that

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        oop is literally poo backwards
        checkmate atheists

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >String
      >primitive

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        It is a builtin type, though less special than numerics (which also have methods)

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          That is, str is a builtin, not String

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Excuse my ignorance

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          What does built in have to do with primitives

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            On a language level it's not composed out of other types, it's provided by the compiler. Sometimes people call that a primitive (even though it isn't one on the hardware level)

  54. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    https://www.ideone.com/0eI0dW
    : divtype ( faunn-f)
    mod IF 2drop ELSE type 1+ THEN ;
    : dofizz ( nn-) DO
    cr 0
    s" fizz" i 3 divtype
    s" buzz" i 5 divtype
    0= IF i . THEN LOOP ;
    31 1 dofizz

  55. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    where's the rest of it

  56. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >no .unwrap()

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