This sentiment is obviously stupid right?

This sentiment is obviously stupid right?
If the author really did mean "the curtains are blue" then they're just a bad writer because a good writer wouldn't waste the readers time with pointless details that add nothing to the story.

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The sentiment is stupid because what the author "meant" means absolutely nothing when it comes to analyses. For some reason a lot of people seem to think that an author's opinion on their own work is the final say. The fact of the matter is that as soon as other people read an author's work, any kind of control over the meaning or symbolism is wrenched from the author's hands. Only you can dictate what you think a book is really about.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      People can inject dumb bullshit into art though. There's a whole cottage industry of off base hot takes that cater to ideologically oriented groups.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        That's simply the double-edged sword of the arts. The freedom of searching for meaning allows us a multitude of different paths to explore, yet it also allows some to purposely twist art to conform to their own narratives.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      People can inject dumb bullshit into art though. There's a whole cottage industry of off base hot takes that cater to ideologically oriented groups.

      That's simply the double-edged sword of the arts. The freedom of searching for meaning allows us a multitude of different paths to explore, yet it also allows some to purposely twist art to conform to their own narratives.

      NTA but I don't think meaning must be completely untethered when separated from the author. Some explanations are better than others; namely, those which provide the most meaning without stretching the literal sentences to absurdity.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Yeah, that's a perfectly reasonable take and authorial intent is of its own interest when it comes to what you can personally take from a given work. It's a cliche but it's pretty much like having a conversation with the writer. However, even a widely off base reading can spark conversation. The problem is when someone takes an ideological rubric and paints by their response to the work by numbers. It's boring.

        Are you replying to the right post?

        Yes. You're moronic. Stop (You)ing me.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Some explanations are better than others
        Oh absolutely, I'm simply talking about the fact that, with persuasive enough evidence, you can fashion your own meaning out of any piece of art. There's a reason most great works have at least few different interpretations.

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    You just wasted my time with your midwit post. Apologize.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      You have no right to call others a midwit if you don't explain why they're wrong.
      Honestly there's nothing more midwit than just calling people midwits on lit all day.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >You have no right to call others a midwit if you don't explain why they're wrong.
        >Honestly there's nothing more midwit than just calling people midwits on lit all day.
        You just broke your own rule, moron.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          No I didn't.
          You can't prove an argument wrong if there was no argument to begin with.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Claim: Once a reader picks up the book the author has not authority over it's contents
            Counter-claim: Sure, but there's a whole cottage industry of people absent mindedly injecting their personal biases into the work (i.e. midwits)
            >Seethe response: YOU CANT JUST CALL SOMEONE A MIDWIT WITHOUT ARGUING AGAINS THEIR CLAIM! YOU'RE A MIDWIT!
            I stand by my comment that you're a moron.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Are you replying to the right post?

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It all depends and usually it's all valid. A good writers mind will work overtime in the subconscious and often there will be a persistent motif or descriptive theme that even they don't catch on to. Meaning in a sad scene they might write something about blue curtains, and not be consciously aware of the reason, but their mind fell to blue because it's in line with a somber tone.
    The realer reality being that no one knows the true intentions of mind itself
    So it doesn't matter

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It's very much dependent on context and as in most things both sides are correct to a certain extent. I will just add there are certain authors who seem to include details that are mundane or apparently meaningless for the sake of authenticity/realism, Graham Greene's a notable example with books like Brighton Rock. What are we to judge is "pointless" to a story given that life is itself composed of so much pointless fluff, detritus? DFW's Pale King is similar but in a more postmodern way in including masses of details and even storylines that may be "pointless" in an almost purposeful "waste" of the reader's time.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      but if the point of including pointless details is to add realism or make the reader self aware that they are intentionally pointless as some meta commentary... then are they really pointless?

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Nothing is pointless. Your conscious mind is a blip on the radar. Lose yourself as you write then come reread it when you find yourself, you'll always spot something unforeseen.
        Nothing is pointless

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        It seems like one would have to clarify what sort of meaning or point is being sought. For example, in Plato, when Socrates starts off a passage say "O best of men" or "O daimonic man", it's usually an ironical signpoint that a crucial refutation is coming up, and he's softening the blow, so there's a function there. Or in Xenophon's Anabasis, he makes these apparently inconsequential observations over whether the cities he and his men encounter are inhabited, prosperous, and large, which by itself seems unimportant, until he starts reporting variants without further comment over cities that are merely inhabited, but by inference, small and poor, and finally an important city just stated to be prosperous and large, but, by inference, and only later confirmed, uninhabited, and this is related to his style of downplaying bad and ugly sides of life.

        Once you get to someone like Keats, however, it's a real question as to why, say, he needs to describe a nightingale somewhat redundantly as "a dryad of the trees" (redundant since dryads are already nymphs only of trees) besides to fill out the line and have a rhyme with "ease." This latter sort seems less tethered toward "meaning" something in every case, and really kind of just making do either to fit a form or out of purely aesthetic fancy. So, to use another example from Keats, is important that in a stanza where he's practically just listing off plants, that he chooses musk-rose versus something else with two syllables? It doesn't seem like an important choice beyond filling a line and because he preferred that example.

        So it looks like sometimes the turn toward a strong aesthetic tendency might affect things such that the curtains are only blue because the author chose it arbitrarily. But it does seem to depend on the author, so, clothing description might be unimportant for some, unless you're Dougkas Copeland trying to specify a character's class and social milieu, or you're Bret Easton Ellis and want to make fun of wallstreet types.

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Texts exceed readers, and readers produce texts from texts. Learn what exegesis and eisegesis are.

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Also the US school of New Criticism.

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