>thoughts on purchasing modem in addition to non-ISP provided wifi router?

>thoughts on purchasing modem in addition to non-ISP provided wifi router?
idk what a modem really has in relation to 'security' but I know that my current modem doesn't allow me to log into it
idk what I could do if logged in, but there is a portal on the modem that apparently doesn't accept any passcode, while it DOES accept a passcode on earlier versions of this modem

>is DOCSIS 3.1 cable modem hackable or should I burn it and get a new one that is safe

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  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Does your ISP charge you for the modem? If not then why bother, unless it's malfunctioning.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      for the same reasons you wouldn't keep and ISP-provided router, I don't want shitty user-hostile malware running on something that I want security and greater knowledge of

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        If you're imagining you're going to prevent your ISP from knowing everything you do, you're not going to.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I'm imagining being able to access the inner workings of the modem software, like with my router, israelite

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Now you're getting insulting for no reason, you sound like you have no idea what you're trying to do. What "inner workings of the modem software" are you even going to configure?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            lmao kys useless homosexual

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            poor quality post. please try harder next time.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            and then what? you still send the same packets to the ISP, they still see everything you do if they feel like digging through your logs.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        modem doesn't matter because it's not on your LAN (if your router is configured correctly.) It doesn't see anything your ISP's own routers outside your house don't see already.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        You should assume the whole internet is made up of hostile malware ridden hardware you have no control over.
        Your modem is just the first of many such devices.
        No point trying to secure anything on the far side of your firewall.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      the configuration options in my isp provided routermodem are godawful and i'm considering changing just for that

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      The trend is, ISPs charge a certain fee per month, which pays for the hardware within half a year, but in the end of the day, you're just renting a fricking pieces of chinesium for $5.

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    using your own router is smart because you dont want them dictating what you do on your local network

    unless you are paying a monthly fee for a modem, there's no real point in buying your own. they will require root access (to update addresses and configs) and so it will be just as insecure

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >they will require root access
      who is they? the ISP? the modem?

      the point is I want to be able to update addresses and configs. could I do this without logging in through the portal it brings up?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        the isp will require root access to the modem to update addresses and configurations. they aren't going to let you set your own

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          so I need to allow the ISP access to the new self-purchased modem in order to use their service or are you referring to the current ISP-provided modem?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >so I need to allow the ISP access to the new self-purchased modem in order to use their service
            Yes

            for the same reasons you wouldn't keep and ISP-provided router, I don't want shitty user-hostile malware running on something that I want security and greater knowledge of

            Any modem your isp allows you to use will give them access so they can get in and configure it however they want.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Any modem your isp allows you to use will give them access so they can get in and configure it however they want.
            For channel bonding configuration shit sure, for spying on you? Not a frickin chance.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Your ISP can already spy on you regardless of your modem. You're acting as if your ISP is some third party and not the ones providing you with access to the internet in the first place.
            It's an entirely different story if it's a router since that gives your ISP access to your LOCAL network but OP is talking the modem not the router

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >For channel bonding configuration shit sure, for spying on you? Not a frickin chance.
            Did i say anything about spying?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I mean, what the frick else did you mean?

            Of course your ISP needs to be able to apply channel settings on your modem, it's THEIR network, they're not going to let you adjust your bonded channels outside of what you pay for.

            And to act like that's some overstep on their part is just moronic.

            Now an ISP supplied modem/router that spys on your LAN and has direct access to your traffic, that's something to be concerned about.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Of course your ISP needs to be able to apply channel settings on your modem, it's THEIR network, they're not going to let you adjust your bonded channels outside of what you pay for.
            That's what op was asking you dummy

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >I need to allow the ISP access to the new self-purchased modem
            No, if you own the gateway you can lock it down however you like. But be prepared for connectivity issues when it breaks compatibility.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I did set a static external ip and route in a Fritzbox before since the automatic fetch didn't work. The ISP technician did give me all the necessary addresses via phone. Mind this was for a business connection, your experience will vary with L1 consumer support.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I have the same brand router in Denmark. I switched the nameservers from the default ones cause of the soft block on torrent websites. I basically use their provided router (which also has WiFi6) as a modem and use an ASUS router for everything else. I have my own nameserver on OpenBSD with unbound. Sure they can tell what IP I'm connecting to but whatever, freedom and all that, they're not supposed to care.

            1) It will just move untrusted network 1 hop futher.
            2) Modem choice is dicted by whenever coax/passive-optics/broadband crap is your ISP using. So it's not something you can easily resell or reuse.
            Not worth it. Genrally treat it same way as you would water/power meter.

            >so I need to allow the ISP access to the new self-purchased modem in order to use their service
            Yes
            [...]
            Any modem your isp allows you to use will give them access so they can get in and configure it however they want.

            the answers I was looking for
            >thanks

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >circ room
            satanic

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Most isps let you bridge your modem and assign the isp to your 3rd party router. Then the modem doesn't even have an ip address.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          They do that over TR-069, no need to log in for that as long as they have your CWMP ID

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I'd preferably like to do this through a shell or via my router ig

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >the point is I want to be able to update addresses and configs.
        That's handled by the router. If you're not using your modem for telephony you can set it to bridge mode and forget about it.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        er du dansk? taler du om fastspeed?

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          ich bin nicht danish, mein freund

          [...]
          Have sex soon.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I have the same brand router in Denmark. I switched the nameservers from the default ones cause of the soft block on torrent websites. I basically use their provided router (which also has WiFi6) as a modem and use an ASUS router for everything else. I have my own nameserver on OpenBSD with unbound. Sure they can tell what IP I'm connecting to but whatever, freedom and all that, they're not supposed to care.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Arent the logins printed on the case of the modem? If they don't work then someone (not your ISP) set them to something different

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    Have sex soon.

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    1) It will just move untrusted network 1 hop futher.
    2) Modem choice is dicted by whenever coax/passive-optics/broadband crap is your ISP using. So it's not something you can easily resell or reuse.
    Not worth it. Genrally treat it same way as you would water/power meter.

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    If you're on a shitty ISP that won't let you change your gateway's ssid/password AND will frick over any modem you buy (such as Morris/Optimum), something like this video (the principle flow of the video) might help you resolve your bullshit.

    ?si=Vm7OvzCUrJo6X-jU

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    There's a lot of morons in this thread, but I've ran my own modem back before I was able to get fiber and here are the important parts:

    1. If your ISP charges you a fee/rent for the modem, it'll pretty much always be cheaper to replace it yourself.
    2. Assuming the modem is a separate unit that is in front of your router, there's not really anything nefarious they could be doing that they couldn't already be doing on their own devices at the other end of your connection. If it's a combo device, absolutely get your own unit.
    3. Conversely, there's not really anything neat/useful you can do with your own modem.
    4. The ISP does NOT need root access to your modem.
    5. You WILL need to contact your ISP to get them to whitelist your modem once it's all hooked up.
    6. There's worse things you could drop ~$100 on for peace of mind.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Biggest problem is if you have ANY issues with your internet the ISP will tell you it's on your end, refuse to troubleshoot, and charge you to send a tech (who will do nothing once he sees your non-ISP modem, even if the issue has nothing to do with the modem).

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        if you use a modem that they say is officially supported (they don't like to advertise this, but they all have a list of "these devices will work" on their site) then they will support you, though they'll act like whiny b***hes and you'll have to tell the phone monkey every time that you specifically got a device that they themselves say is supported.

        Your ISP can already spy on you regardless of your modem. You're acting as if your ISP is some third party and not the ones providing you with access to the internet in the first place.
        It's an entirely different story if it's a router since that gives your ISP access to your LOCAL network but OP is talking the modem not the router

        Having a modem moves the boundary between devices the ISP controls and devices you control. The ISP will have root on whatever it is that directly connects to their network, you want that to be a modem that's essentially a dumb ethernet-to-coax-or-whatever adapter, and NOT the router that sees everything on your LAN, provides your DNS service, etc. If the actual router is under your control and everything that talks to the modem (and thus the internet) goes through it you can e.g. make sure you don't use the ISP's DNS servers, make sure traffic is encrypted before they see it, etc.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >whitelist
      Not just that, they don't even know who or where you are if they don't have your serial number in their database

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >DOCSIS 3.1 cable modem
    >hackable
    haha no. should start calling this shit cuck broadband.

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    You guys still use modems? LMAO

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      give me a quantum laptop

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Guess a P2P fiber connection is too futuristic for you?

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          To be fair, as far as a consumer is concerned, your Fiber connection's ONT is the rough equivalent to a modem.

          Some fiber ISPs use their own supplied ONT (modem) some use ONT/Router combo units, some allow you to bring your own ONT as long as it's compatible with their fiber standards and security, just like modems with cable ISPs.

          The ONT converts fiber to ethernet clopper
          The Modem converts Coax copper to ethernet copper.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Ont/router combos are fricking cancer

            I hate this fricking thing

            t. isp helpdesk janny

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Yeah, thank god my ISP uses standalone ONTs and I can use whatever router I feel like.

            xPON isn't P2P. I don't have an ONT. I get a BiDi fiber directly from the ISP switch. And that plugs straight into my router.

            Unrealistic outside of highly subsidized networks or in very highly populated areas (or where a government just says frick it and pays for it with taxes)

            True P2P fiber is great, but outside of the 0.001% of the world that has access to that xPON is the future for consumer fiber.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            The only reason to use them is just to have the most control over your customer equipment as possible.

            They're just not flexible, tend to have shit features and horrible UIs.

            Generally standalone ONTs are just all around better (though there are some cheap/shit ones too)

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Ont/router combos are fricking cancer
            ONT/router combos are fricking great (if you don't need advanced routing features and are fine with a GREAT 802.11ac radio)

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            there is simply no reason for it besides you want to give your customers less flexibility and have tighter control over their networks.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >there is simply no reason for it
            It's cheaper surely.
            >besides you want to give your customers less flexibility and have tighter control over their networks.
            All the fiber ISPs here let you bridge mode them. You can also dump pppoe creds yourself from that Huawei.

            > capable of solid 10:1 gigabit on 18yo infrastructure
            That's simply not true.

            10/1gbps DOCSIS wouldn't become a standard until 2013, and wouldn't become deployed at any real scale until mid/late 2016.

            Sure the copper runs from 20-30 years ago don't need to be re-run, but you still need to upgrade the equipment at the cabinet level and customer equipment which is a massive infrastructure investment.

            DOCSIS 3.0 came out in 2006, which by the way is when the spec was finalized, not when it was actually being deployed by ISPs, most ISPs would start deployment 2-5 years later. But in any case, even if you DID have DOCSIS 3.0 in 2006, you would still need to spend tons of money replacing the DOCSIS 3.0 equipment with DOCSIS 3.1 capable stuff.

            >That's simply not true.
            I meant 1000/100 over 3.0 from 2006 but I worded it like a fricking moron.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >It's cheaper surely.
            Only if your ISP waited until those solutions were available. Early fiber ISPs had no choice as standalone ONTs were the only thing on the market. Many of those early ISPs continue using standalone ONTs because often they're installed externally on their house with only an ethernet cable going into the house for a router. So instead of ripping the old ONT out, running a new fiber (potentially needing a new splice) into the house for a combo ONT/router. And even if they already have a fiber run into the house, they'll still use standalone ONTs since the majority of their network is standalone ONTs it's what their techs are used to working on and their support staff are used to troubleshooting.

            There are also plenty of apartment buildings where it's easier to run fiber to a central location in the building (or on each floor) and just have ethernet runs to each apartment and there is a single ONT that handles multiple IPs simultaneously.

            Plenty of scenarios where combo units aren't preferred.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >just have ethernet runs to each apartment and there is a single ONT that handles multiple IPs simultaneously.
            apartments sound like hell

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            You get to use your own router, and as long as they're not over populating the fiber splits it's actually not bad. Plenty of RF congestion from everyone having their own routers and access points competing to out power each other.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >RF congestion from everyone having their own routers and access points competing to out power each other.
            Bane of my existence

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            We usually install the ONT in the basement and tell the building owner that it's his responsibility to run ethernet cables there.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Sounds like a shit ISP

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            i have that shit huawei from sbb and no it doesnt fricking allow bridge mode and cant change dns or open ports cause its behing cgnat shit
            please tell me more about dumping the pppoe stuff
            i didnt see it anywhere on site like benchmark forum

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >huawei
            >sbb
            what drugs are you on SBB never had huawei equipment
            their 100 total fiber users are on a cucked nokia ONT router combo and for DOCSIS you get ubee or sdmc both dogshit
            >it doesnt fricking allow bridge mode and cant change dns or open ports cause its behing cgnat shit
            you have absolutely no use to open ports behind CGNAT. start sucking dick because that's the only way to get anything out of SBB
            >please tell me more about dumping the pppoe stuff
            there is no PPPOE on DOCSIS its all 100% FRICKING PROPRIETARY
            now if its telekom srbija HG8245Q2 then it could be done over telnet or you can pay for a static IP and they even give you them

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            xPON isn't P2P. I don't have an ONT. I get a BiDi fiber directly from the ISP switch. And that plugs straight into my router.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            xPON is better and faster than 1Gb/s AON, as long as the ISP doesn't overbook the fibers. And it is easier to manage for them as well. Don't be surprised if your ISP upgrades you in the future

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Cable modems are effectively controlled by your ISP. They decide what firmware and what software is loaded on it. The only reason to buy your own is if the one your ISP supplies you lacks some functionality that you want.

  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Get fiber internet
    Cable has horrible upload speeds
    Fiber has this optical terminal thingy and you can get your own router

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      If you get GPON fiber then the ISP could just refuse to register your GPON ID and you won't be able to use your own ONT.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        While true, he didn't say bring your own ONT, he said you can use your own router, which is true for most fiber ISPs in the US.

        Though I know some few fiber ISPs do have ONT/Router combo units and you're not allowed to use your own router.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Use the providers terminal and you can use your own router for wifi

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          No u

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Cable has horrible upload speeds
      it's capable of solid 10:1 gigabit on 18yo infrastructure if you aren't a f*rst worlder
      (SBB israelites want very much for 1000/100 frick them)

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        > capable of solid 10:1 gigabit on 18yo infrastructure
        That's simply not true.

        10/1gbps DOCSIS wouldn't become a standard until 2013, and wouldn't become deployed at any real scale until mid/late 2016.

        Sure the copper runs from 20-30 years ago don't need to be re-run, but you still need to upgrade the equipment at the cabinet level and customer equipment which is a massive infrastructure investment.

        DOCSIS 3.0 came out in 2006, which by the way is when the spec was finalized, not when it was actually being deployed by ISPs, most ISPs would start deployment 2-5 years later. But in any case, even if you DID have DOCSIS 3.0 in 2006, you would still need to spend tons of money replacing the DOCSIS 3.0 equipment with DOCSIS 3.1 capable stuff.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        It has to be 1:1 for me
        In my area in California my only options are spectrum gigabit for $80 with 35Mbps upload or frontier communications with 1000/1000 at $65
        Cable is terrible
        Optical is the future

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >frontier communications with 1000/1000 at $65
          Verizon really lucked out selling their fiber in southern and western states. Verizon kept the north east US, and sold almost everything else to frontier. Now Verizon Fios has like 3-4x the revenue of frontier fiber, with a fraction of the network footprint.

  11. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It's worth buying a modem just to be able to soft reboot it.
    Also modern ISP provided modems are so locked down you can't even see the snr on the channels, lest you complain about them to the script readers. It's all a joke.

  12. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    That's pretty much what I did, I don't like those two in ones, but you don't need to login to a modem, it's just converting the signal.

  13. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Renting the ISP modem is a money pit I quit many years ago and the money saved bought two cable modems (not at once) so I've one for backup and troubleshooting. I just call my ISP and they bless the MAC address of the one I'm using.

    The poor and those who can tolerate downtime if a modem dies (rare IME) can stick with one and if it croaks use their phone to order another and maintain connectivity.

  14. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Any recommendations on a DOCSIS 3.1 or 4.0 modem that works with Comcast's voice phone service? They're pushing my dad to upgrade from his old DOCSIS 3.0 rental modem to a new one. If he's going to go through the trouble of swapping out the modem, he'd prefer to buy one.
    The requirement that it supports Comcast voice telephone service is the only twist as far fewer modems support it than internet service alone. He's not willing to port his number to a VOIP for some reason, something about it not being certified for medical communications but Comcast voice somehow does have that certification.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Motorola MT8733.

      The XB10 xfinity DOCSIS 4.0 gateway should also be available in late 2024, though I wouldnt recommend it unless you need it for DOCSIS 4.0 service.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >DOCSIS 4.0 gateway
        they basically don't exist yet on any real scale.

  15. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Well, you see...
    >'security'
    ...nevermind.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Frick you

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        in all seriousness though, there is no point in trying to explain anything to "muh privacy and security" obsessed goycattle

  16. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    With my provider you can only use their modem.
    Had to mail them request to disable router part since it's modem/router combo so I can use mikrotik instead and another separate email to frick off with nat and give me ip address.
    I still don't like that modem thing, it works good and is stable but is running hot and pulls 12w from the wall.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      That sounds dystopian

  17. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I don't understand anything in this thread. I'v set up some modems in my time and have no memory of what I did.

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