Current unixtime / unix timestamp:

1597327032

seconds since Jan 01 1970 (UTC).

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What is Unix time?

Unix time, also sometimes known as POSIX or epoch time, is a universal system for keeping track of time that is useful in computer technology. Why? Because unix time is simply a count of seconds that have elapsed since January 1 1970, 00:00:00 UTC (the Unix epoch), and that makes for some terribly easy time-related computing and programming (think sorting, math, etc). The unix time(stamp) can always be converted into any normal date format needed.

Convert dates to unix timestamps…

…or unix timestamps to dates…

Available options for the date format field (when converting from unixtime to date):

d

Day of the month, 2 digits with leading zeros

01 to 31

D

A textual representation of a day, three letters

Mon through Sun

j

Day of the month without leading zeros

1 to 31

l

A full textual representation of the day of the week

Sunday through Saturday

N

ISO-8601 numeric representation of the day of the week

1 (for Monday) through 7 (for Sunday)

S

English ordinal suffix for the day of the month, 2 characters

st, nd, rd or th. Works well with j

w

Numeric representation of the day of the week

0 (for Sunday) through 6 (for Saturday)

z

The day of the year (starting from 0)

0 through 365

W

ISO-8601 week number of year, weeks starting on Monday

Example: 42 (the 42nd week in the year)

F

A full textual representation of a month, such as January or March

January through December

m

Numeric representation of a month, with leading zeros

01 through 12

M

A short textual representation of a month, three letters

Jan through Dec

n

Numeric representation of a month, without leading zeros

1 through 12

t

Number of days in the given month

28 through 31

L

Whether it's a leap year

1 if it is a leap year, 0 otherwise

o

ISO-8601 year number. Same value as Y except that if the ISO week number (W) belongs to the previous or next year, that year is used instead.

Examples: 1999 or 2003

Y

A full numeric representation of a year, 4 digits

Examples: 1999 or 2003

y

A two digit representation of a year

Examples: 99 or 03

a

Lowercase Ante meridiem and Post meridiem

am or pm

A

Uppercase Ante meridiem and Post meridiem

AM or PM

B

Swatch Internet time

000 through 999

g

12-hour format of an hour without leading zeros

1 through 12

G

24-hour format of an hour without leading zeros

0 through 23

h

12-hour format of an hour with leading zeros

01 through 12

H

24-hour format of an hour with leading zeros

00 through 23

i

Minutes with leading zeros

00 to 59

s

Seconds, with leading zeros

00 through 59

O

Difference to Greenwich time (GMT) in hours

Example: +0200

P

Difference to Greenwich time (GMT) with colon between hours and minutes

Example: +02:00

T

Timezone abbreviation

Examples: EST, MDT ...

Z

Timezone offset in seconds. The offset for timezones west of UTC is always negative, and for those east of UTC is always positive.

-43200 through 50400

c

ISO 8601 date

2004-02-12T15:19:21+00:00

r

RFC 2822 formatted date

Example: Thu, 21 Dec 2000 16:01:07 +0200

Unixtime trivia

The year 2038 problem

On January 19 2038, Unix time 2147483647, systems still storing Unix time as a signed 32-bit integer will start to malfunction due to an overflow. 2147483647 is simply as high as a signed 32-bit integer can go! The bugs that will result are specific to the way the respective OS or program is using Unix time; they can be lethal shutdowns or harmless GUI errors. This problem is similar to the Y2K incident, and it is therefore variously named the Unix Millennium bug, Y2K38, or simply the year 2038 problem. More info at wikipedia.org/wiki/Year_2038_problem.

1000000000th second

Unix time 1000000000 fell on 9th September 2001, 01:46:40 AM (UTC) and was celebrated in by a party held by Danish UNIX User Group in Copenhagen.

1234567890 day

Unix time 1234567890 ticked on 13th February of 2009, 11:31:30 PM (UTC). Thanks in part to the success of previous unix time parties, and the efforts of 1234567890day.com (defunct), '1234567890 parties' were held in many major cities around the world.