We already know that monotheistic religions can evolve from polytheistic ones, but can the reverse happen ?

We already know that monotheistic religions can evolve from polytheistic ones, but can the reverse happen ?
There's any historical example of an polytheistic religion developing from a monotheistic religion ?

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  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Christianity

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      christians praying to saints and venerating icons of them

      Christianity

      Not polytheism
      Saints are not considered gods or treated as such

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Christianity

        The trinity is polytheism.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Saints,if you see them for what they are, so, beyond the asthestics, saints are effectively just "Lower gods" that Christians worship alongside, the main "Big god" that Christian worship.
        That "Big god" being also 3 separated being and also 1 being?
        So, with all of that, how is Christianity not effectively "Polytheist"?????

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        They may not be considered gods but how are they not treated as such?

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        When you put your hands together and say "please Saint Jerome, help me finish this translation on time" that's pretty clearly an entreaty to an entity distincy from the primary god to intervene on your behalf. Regardless of how the entity is designated, that's really fricking poly.

        • 2 weeks ago
          JWanon

          You're supposed to ask for intercession from a saint not directly pray to them. And yes, before you smugly reply, I know that christians don't understand this and pray to saints anyways.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            No, my smug reply is that there's no qualitative difference between asking for an intercession and praying. Saying "oh nooooo, you're not praying to the saint, you're asking the saint to pray for you!" is still seeking the same result. Different words or adding a step doesn't change what the squishy human saying the words wants; "an entity distinct from the primary god to intervene on your behalf."

            And of course, it's pretty fricked up if you think about it. God is omnipotent and omnipresent, he can hear your chat with the saint just as well as the saint can, so what the heaven is going on that God would say "yeah, Jerome, I heard them, I wasn't gonna bother, but since you're bringing it up too, sure, we'll help the scribe get the translation done on time. Give him a shot of caffeine or something." What the frick, does God not trust Their own judgement? Is this just some nepo shit where the more people you get badgering God, the more of a shit He gives?

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Yeah. It's called prayer maxxing. The same is true if you ask bunches of people on Twitter or facebook to pray for you. The more people praying for a cause the more likely God is to do it. The saints are alive so asking the saint to pray for you is similar except they are closer to God than people outside of heaven. You say your prayer to God then ask the saint to pray for you then also ask Twitter followers to pray for you. That's called prayermaxxing.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            People also pray for money and other material shit (that isn't absolutely essential, like covering medical care or food), that doesn't make it less messed up. Weirdass prosperity gospel kind of view of a relationship with God.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            It's normal for people to pray for that. I see people praying for things like a new job or promotion all the time. People also pray for a girlfriend or to pass the test at school or for their football team to win the game.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Lots of things are normal for sinful, selfish humans.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Natural-born Citizen

            >that isn't absolutely essential
            But who gets to decide what is essential or not?
            If someone is willing to actually pray for something to happen, who are you to say they don't deserve it anyway?

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Also you can ask a saint to pray to God but you can't ask God to pray to God. Asking God to pray to God is pointless so asking for prayers isn't the same as what you'd say to God. It's like if you had a petition to bring to someone's desk. You need more signatures. Luckily, prayer maxxing is much easier with social media. You can get hundreds or even thousands of people to pray for your cause.

            Inb4 Jesus. Jesus prayed to the Father to show us an example. God doesn't pray to Himself to ask Himself things. God is God.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      christians praying to saints and venerating icons of them

      Christianity

      [...]
      [...]
      Not polytheism
      Saints are not considered gods or treated as such

      Christianity

      The trinity is polytheism.

      Christianity is Henotheism
      >When the Most High divided the nations, when he separated the sons of Adam, he set the bounds of the nations according to the number of the angels of God - Deuteronomy 32:8

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    christians praying to saints and venerating icons of them

  3. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Christianity

  4. 2 weeks ago
    Natural-born Citizen

    Does the demolition of the Aten cult count?

  5. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    There no such thing as monotheism
    Christian denominations that don't practice saint's cult/veneration still have the trinity
    Islam venerates mohamed and have the jins
    Judaism, when start to dig in, have angels as predominant figures that need to be appease with keywords and purification ritual before being contacted and Metraton is even refered as little Yahweh in some tex, and when you look into kabala god is just like the christian trinity, but instead of three person you have twelve/thirteen sephiroth

  6. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >but can the reverse happen ?
    1. Arianism Christianity (Trinity are separate gods)

    2. Orthodox sophiology (Sophia is the 4th aspect of Trinity)
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sophia_(wisdom)#Christian_mysticism
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sophiology

    3. Karl Jung (aka God the Devil as yet another aspect of Trinity)
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Answer_to_Job

    Jeez, the amount of entities just keeps growing!

    • 2 weeks ago
      Natural-born Citizen

      >God the Devil
      Spicy!

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Jeez, the amount of entities just keeps growing!
      "The Gibsonian Cyberspace-mythos describes the electro-digital infosphere first integrating into a Godlike unitary being, a technorealized omniscient personality and later, when it changed, fragmenting into demons, modelled on the haitian Loa. What makes this account so anomalous in relation to teleological theology and light-side capitalist time is that Unity is placed in the middle, as a stage – or interlude – to be passed through. It is not that One becomes Many, expressing the monopolized divine-power of an original unity, but rather that a number or numerousness – finding no completion in the achievement of unity – moves on."

  7. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    How is the Precolumbian part of this chart even MORE WRONG then it was in the 2.0 version?

    Moche, Inca, etc religion shouldn't be a fricking offshoot of Mesoamerican religions, having Teotihuacan develop out of the Olmec but not others is dumb, Aztec developing out of Maya is also stupid, etc. Also their symbol used for the Moiche isn't moche, it's aztec (their teotihuacan, maya, and aztec symbols are totally made up)

    The Andes are basically totally disconnected from Mesoamerica. The root mesoamerican thing should be an Olmec, Early Preclassic Maya, and West Mexican labels, then Olmec should branch out to Teotihuacan/Central Mexican, Oaxacan/.Zapotec/Mixtec, should re-connect with the Maya branch, with Aztec developing out of the Teotihuacan/Central Mexican branch with a dotted line amount of influence coming in from a uto-aztecan/Southwestern North american branch, (which the chart fricks up too by having comanche, in a totally different offshoot from hopi, pueblo, etc, I think?)

    What I said is still a huge oversimplification, but it's at least not outright wrong

  8. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    mormonism

  9. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Zoroastrianism
    >6th century BCE
    lmao. it's the world's oldest religion

  10. 2 weeks ago
    Radiochan

    mormonism

  11. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The distinction between “monotheism” and “polytheism” is in practice meaningless, Abrahamists have decided they are “monotheists” and everybody who doesn’t worship the israelite god to their satisfaction is a “polytheist”. Monotheism=Abrahamic, polytheist=infidel is much closer to true than “monotheists believe in only one God”. Angels and the Devil are gods in virtually all popular Abrahamic practice. Jesus for Christians and Mohammad for Muslims are also usually treated as gods. Few true monotheist sects are popular, it’s mostly some israelites and more speculative Christians/Muslims which actually believe in one God only. You might not call them “gods”, per se, and/or you don’t worship them, but changing the name of something does not change its nature and not worshiping something doesn’t mean you don’t conceive of them as a god. The whole dichotomy/obsession is one of the few israeli traditions which is common among all the Abrahamists, and one of the last vestiges of the Christian worldview which is still often uncritically credited by otherwise serious scholars of religion.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I would agree with this for Christianity but not necessarily Judaism or Islam. Judaism is very varied, some of its more Christian-like expressions can be technically polytheist, but I think Islam is certainly squarely monotheist. The angels are barely autonomous entities and Satan is just a voice in your head, he's not portrayed anything like he is in Christianity. These are all just rather weak supernatural beings who happen to exist, but they don't fill the roles of gods in pagan religions like how saints and angels do in Christianity. If this broke monotheism we have to question if accepting the existence of humans might be polytheism. In any case, it makes Islam the dullest.

      >obscure influence
      It's not obscure at all

      Are you the Baal-Ali schizo?

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >you the Baal-Ali schizo
        No. But Ali was one of the names of Baal as shown by the ugarit texts. Ali is just a cognate of El as well. It obviously referred to a god of some kind. In pre islamic times it appears as part of compound theophoric name such as Samah'Ali

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >From Arabic عَلِيّ (ʕaliyy, literally “high, exalted”)
          It makes perfect sense for gods to be referred to as this without there being a direct connection to the person of Ali ibn Abi Talib. However, in a more abstract sense, I can believe the preceding polytheistic cultures predisposed the people towards shaping Islam into a more polytheistic direction. I'm also not suspecting overt pagan influence as much as other major religions, like Manichaeism, Christianity and Gnostic holdouts. Alawism and Druzism seem influenced by these.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >being a direct connection to the person of Ali ibn Abi Talib
            Except that Ali is only attested as part of theophoric names. You can see remnants of this still in modern times as theophoric names with Ali are common among shia. And most names for gods have similar meanings to high and exalted. Many are just Synonyms. It's obvious Ali is some sort of god-man mix

  12. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Catholicism

  13. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Mormonism

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      mormonism

      Very good example. Mormons believe in tritheism which is that God the Father, Jesus Christ and the Holy Spirit are three God-beings (as opposed to one God being), thus three separate gods.
      The word you want to describe the countless other gods Mormonism teaches exist is henotheism - they believe these gods exist (and are true gods) but don't worship them.

  14. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Catholicism

  15. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Christianity may be polytheistic, but it didn't evolve to be such entirely autonomously. The excessive emphasis on angels, saints and demons is largely due to "admixture" from paganism, in Christianity being the least pure Abrahamic religion. I think Shia Islam is a more promising thing to look at, though it may have some obscure influence from pre-Islamic religions as well. But I think the cult around Muhammad, Ali and the Imams and the increasing exaggeration of their theological importance is a good reference for how monotheism can evolve into polytheism.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >obscure influence
      It's not obscure at all

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