>wearing ALL THAT SHIT in the southern heat

>wearing ALL THAT SHIT in the southern heat
lol
>it's made of wool
LOL

why the frick would they do that to themselves?

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Modern clothes feel like shit to wear because the thread count is so fricking high. Like you’re wearing a solid sheet instead of fabric* with tiny holes.
    Everything about the modern world, up to and including the minutiae of how clothing is manufactured, is complete fricking dogshit and anti human.
    Except iPads, those are really easy to use. So easy you can just let your toddlers “play” on them for 3 straight hours at a time while you seethe at whatever inanity is preoccupying you.

    All that to say; before modern machines could weave fabric inhumanly* tight, it was way less “thick” and solid.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      So it was more breathable despite being heavy wool?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Yes, I couldn’t give you exact* thread counts, but watch someone weaving fabric traditionally on a loom and try to see how “open” the holes in the fabric are, and compare it a modern machine woven piece of fabric.
        You can only thread things so tight by hand.
        Now, uniforms by 1860 weren’t necessarily by hand, but they weren’t made by computer-aided robotic looms either. Mechanical looms which still weren’t threading very tightly; roughly equivalent to what could be done by hand but mass-produced.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Exactly, fabric that is put together by hand can be pulled apart by hands, or even just a bit of movement. Wearing layers was very important, and only poor people wore the bare minimum. The bare minimum did not leave much to the imagination.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Wool is a pretty breathable fabric, and of course it would've been a thinner weave than you're likely thinking of

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Shill your e-waste elsewhere Tim

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I always thought it was just the coat and nothing else, which would be bad but not terrible.

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Heat feels somewhat bearable if you arent obese

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      liar, I'm 6'1", 155 lb, and I'm dying of heat stroke out here

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Im 5’9 140lb and i do just fine here in Georgia.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          I'm Yokohama, we're just starting to hit 80 degrees and I'm already suffering. The east asian summer is hell. Roughly equivalent to dixie. Can't imagine wearing wool anything here

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I have the bodytype of an Auschwitz inmate and I can barely cope with Canadian summer, let alone fighting for the confederacy for years south of the Mason-Dixon.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        liar, I'm 6'1", 155 lb, and I'm dying of heat stroke out here

        That's because your ancestors were stupid and moved to a region they were clearly not adapted to.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          It’s a white man thing, you wouldn’t get it. You can tell the real 21st century ARYANS because we can feel Antarctica calling.

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Wool is actually superior in every way to cotton

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Are they really made of wool? What about all that cotton they were making in the south?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Yeah, what's with that

      Cotton takes forever to dry out and doesn't stay warm when wet, but that second point would only be relevant in winter, but even then the South isn't that cold

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Cotton was a cash crop exported mainly to the Old World. That's why the market became unviable after Britain began to source their from India during the war.

      You could get cotton clothing, but it would likely be expensive and specially made.

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Honestly the cotton undershirt is surprisingly comfy. You gradually come to be acclimated to the heat if you wear the uniform for long enough.

    t. have done 10 mile hikes in full Confederate kit

    Those shoes and boots though. I have no fricking idea how anyone put up with them. Walk a mile in brogans and you legitimately want to die. I'll take my steel-toed Timberland boots over that shit.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >t. have done 10 mile hikes in full Confederate kit
      this made me lol in the middle of my office. everyone looked at me

      never change IQfy

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Historical reenactments are a thing, it's not that big of a deal.
        Or does any Confederate cosplay in modern America mean you're a Nazi now?

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Non-Americans don't get the historical reenactment thing unless they're big into Napoleonic stuff, in which case they can't be under 50. America is the only place where people continue to get into it.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            I'm a non-American tho
            We don't really do military reenactments like America but we do have a lot of ANZAC dressup and larping. There's a hike in Papua New Guinea done by WWII soldiers called the Kokoda trail that people still do.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >dressing up in WWII kit to do the Kokoda Track

            Isn't it already an extremely dangerous trek?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            probably a lot less dangerous if you have the right gear and no japs to worry about, also idk if they do the whole thing

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >also idk if they do the whole thing

            They pretty have to because there's no point of entry/exit between Port Moresby and Kokoda Station, which has an airstrip for accommodating tourists/emergency services. If you get into trouble on the track, your own only way out is on a helicopter.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            The second biggest cowboy larping market outside the US is actually Hungary which has a established cowboy blackpowder hobby. Also most western Euros especially the bongs have a large Roman legionnaire larp groups

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            English civil war LARP is also big in Britain. To the point pre-Napoleonic re-enactments are exempted from having a loicense for real muskets and real cannons.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Here in Poland we have 2 larps WW2 and Grunwald

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >The second biggest cowboy larping market outside the US is actually Hungary which has a established cowboy blackpowder hobby
            That’s so based it’s unbelievable. The wild plains of the Carpathian basin and the wild west of North America are united in pvre equestrian spirit VGH frick it one struggle

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Historical reenactments are a thing, it's not that big of a deal.
        Or does any Confederate cosplay in modern America mean you're a Nazi now?

        I did it in Harpers Ferry, WV which is literally a National Battlefield and is surrounded by miles of parks. And yes it was with a group of reenactors.

        Also, VMI cadets march 90 miles up to New Market every year in Confederate kit as a requirement for graduation.

        Timbs are great. I've had mine for six years of near-daily use and they're still going

        So comfy too

        [...]
        not fat. still get hot in short jackets

        I've had the same set for about 10 years but have had to spend about $100 repairing it (mainly replacing the soles, also patching up water damage). I don't wear them as often as anymore because I have hiking sneakers now.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >I've had the same set for about 10 years
          I kneel

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          based

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous
    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Timbs are great. I've had mine for six years of near-daily use and they're still going

      So comfy too

      >the idea of wearing a short jacket is somehow alien

      How fat are you OP? Have you seen your own penis this decade?

      not fat. still get hot in short jackets

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      shoes are the one thing of modernity I do not take for granted.Maybe back then peoples soles were horribly callused idk, everyone was basically just walking around on hard leather all day

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >the idea of wearing a short jacket is somehow alien

    How fat are you OP? Have you seen your own penis this decade?

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    The coats were mostly for going into battle or when it got cold at night. During long marches and trench work you took it off.

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >t, modern city slicker
    Thinner weaves, and wool isnt as bad as you might think it is.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Thinner weaves aside, I've never heard of anyone wearing wool in warm weather. Wool keeps heat. Hence high latitudes preferring wool, low latitudes preferring cotton and linen once they got the tech.

      I think they wore wool because Europe was doing it, therefore they had to do it too, heatstroke be damned

      pic very related. all that shit in fricking BRAZIL with no AC huehue

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >wool
    Imagine the itching, the sweating, the allergies. Just shoot me and get it over with.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      oh shit I didn't even think about the itching

      I read somewhere that people didn't really have allergies back then since they were around stuff like wool, animals, and flowers more often. does anyone know if this is true?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Part of your immune system is the natural essential oils of your skin. They have anti-bacterial and insect repellent properties. Working on a farm in the summer I noticed mosquitos would (mostly) leave me alone if I shower at night instead of in the morning. Modern bathing practices, first thing in the morning, with hot water and industrially produced super-soap, strip all of that off and all the mosquitos can smell you from a kilometre away.

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