Well, I finished it. I have, for the record, officially been filtered. How can I recover from this?

Well, I finished it. I have, for the record, officially been filtered. How can I recover from this? Shall I flip back to pg.1 and start over?

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  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I don't think so necessarily.
    Search for some other work that'll resonate with you.
    Maybe down the line one day you'll come back to it and it'll make some sense.
    But it doesn't have to for now.

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    i don't think i have the intellectual capabilities to read and understand this but if you gays can read it so can i

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      It's not particularly difficult, just make sure you pay attention to what you read

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Start reading some Vertigo comics and leaving the Simpsons on in the background while you sleep.
    Then graduate to books on philosophy and arthouse films playing while you sleep.

    You are now ready to get Pynched.

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    What is so fitlering about this specific book? Before you come at me, I have already read it, and a lot of things made sense, but others just didn't click (especially the last part).

    OP, can you tell it to me straight: what is so filtering about the book?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      For me its how it cuts to a new scene with new characters and im scratching my head trying to understand the context or how it relates to anything else. Im on a part with someone named Leni and Peter and I checked the guide and its supposed to be a flashback or something? Just shit like that I would be completely lost without the guide

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        What is so fitlering about this specific book? Before you come at me, I have already read it, and a lot of things made sense, but others just didn't click (especially the last part).

        OP, can you tell it to me straight: what is so filtering about the book?

        yeah, to the end it started making less and less sense because of all the characters piling up, and I read it over the course of a month so to the end I was running into part 1 characters like Roger Mexico and the White Visitation and having only vague recollections of what they were.

        >trying to understand the context or how it relates to anything else.
        I gave up on that and hoped it would make sense in the end, it did not

        but yeah, awesome book, I think not being able to keep up with everything is part of the experience. Europe dissolving into this unclear blurry mess of nationalities, names, allegiances, lies, etc etc. some things just never being resolved - like the Argentine submariners - really gave me that feeling

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I just know there are a million connections and implications and pieces of subtext that went right over my bald head.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        ill add that I still liked the book a lot, obviosuly b/c I finished it. I like his style, his prose, his vulgarity. Especially liked the section about the dodo bird massacre and the section about Tchitcherine and Enzians dad in Africa. If someone asked me what GR was about I would have a hard time explaining it, and as a matter of fact that has already happened twice. I just end up sounding like a paranoid schizo talking about reverse Pavlovian causality and boners and Nazis and the illuminati and shit and petroleum and......

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Well done, anon. I felt kind of the same when reading it. There was a lot of shit that didn't make any sense whatsoever, and I'm also sure that I didn't understand the book perfectly, but I enjoyed the hell out of it. The Dodo section is also my most favorite part of the book; it's just a so stunningly beautiful analogy.

          >That was it, right there. No language meant no chance of co-opting them in to what their round and flaxen invaders were calling Salvation. But Frans, in the course of morning lights lonelier than most, could not keep from finally witnessing a miracle: a Gift of Speech . . . a Conversion of the Dodoes. Ranked in thousands on the shore, with a luminous profile of reef on the water behind them, its roar the only sound on the morning, volcanoes at rest, the wind suspended, an autumn sunrise dispensing light glassy and deep over them all . . . they have come from their nests and rookeries, from beside the streams bursting out the mouths of lava tunnels, from the minor islands awash like debris off the north coast, from sudden waterfalls and the wasted rain-forests where the axeblades are rusting and the rough flumes rot and topple in the wind, from their wet mornings under the shadows of mountain-stubs they have waddled in awkward pilgrimage to this assembly: to be sanctified, taken in. . . For as much as they are the creatures of God, and have the gift of rational discourse, acknowledging that only in His Word is eternal life to be found... And there are tears of happiness in the eyes of the dodoes. They are all brothers now, they and the humans who used to hunt them, brothers in Christ, the little baby they dream now of sitting near, roosting in his stable, feathers at peace, watching over him and his dear face all night long. . . .

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Hell yeah this scene sticks in my mind as well, such a cool calculated mix of violence and lyricism

            > Once he sat all day staring at a single white dodo’s egg in a grass hummock. The place was too remote for any foraging pig to’ve found. He waited for scratching, a first crack reaching to net the chalk surface: an emergence. Hemp gripped in the teeth of the steel snake, ready to be lit, ready to descend, sun to black-powder sea, and destroy the infant, egg of light into egg of darkness, within its first minute of amazed vision, of wet downstirred cool by these south-east trades… . Each hour he sighted down the barrel. It was then, if ever, he might have seen how the weapon made an axis potent as Earth’s own between himself and this victim, still one, inside the egg, with the ancestral chain, not to be broken out for more than its blink of world’s light. There they were, the silent egg and the crazy Dutchman, and the hookgun that linked them forever, framed, brilliantly motionless as any Vermeer. Only the sun moved: from zenith down at last behind the snaggleteeth of mountains to Indian ocean, to tarry night. The egg, without a quiver, still unhatched. He should have blasted it then where it lay: he understood that the bird would hatch before dawn. But a cycle was finished.

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Im on my third attempt. Its interesting from like sentence to sentence but half the time I have no idea what the frick is going on. Im using a guide now and it somewhat is helping

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    start over

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Anybody got a link to an analysis of this book? a lecture, substack, anything that will help me understand?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Read up on the author's family history, maybe check out Hawthorne's expose

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It's a vibes books. There's not much to get( the intersection of destructive technology and human chimpishness? It's style in historical context?) I had a bit of a shoulder shrug when I first finished it, but I've returned to different parts a lot and enjoy reading about it.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      sounds like u got filtered kiddo, just accept it.

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Why is re-reading a book considered an admission of failure? Every single author writes hoping that his books are re-read, yet 99% of readers despise re-reading a book.

    Yeah of course go back and re-read it, dingus. You got better things to do in life or something?

  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Read Cryig Lot. It's just shitposting and it doesn't get better past Mason.

  11. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I read this years ago, I needed annotations to explain all the historical detail. I might reread it now that I'm older and I recently read other Pynchon and found them more accessible.

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