What am I in for?

What am I in for?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Spend years learning Russian
    >All the dialogue is in French

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      why did elitetards think speaking foreign language in daily conversations is cool?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        same reason why every swede speaks swenglish. it is easier to use the language in which all media and entertainment uses. because we're bombarded with english words which we use to replace antiquated swedish words. especially if it is a sign of status.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        as one of the major themes of the novels go, the elite of the world are soulless internationalists at their core, and theyre literally like a bunch highschool kids trying to fit in to the international elite culture and be trendy and prove themselves according to that metric, and at the time speaking french was a trendy sign of being a cultured person.

        the novel plays on this irony throughout the narrative as everyone flip flops on napoleon depending on the diplomatic situation, showing complete inconsistency of beliefs, then France invades and everyone scorns the french while speaking french and following french trends, and eventually, the invasion forces many people to face this irony and many are taken by a nationalist spirit and abandon that internationalist mode of thinking and connect more to their Russian roots, eventually culminating events like the rostovs giving up the last of their wealth to save a bunch of pleb soldiers

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          and what's amazing is that this is just one of the 1000 thematic threads in this book. war and peace is actually better than its reputation suggests, it's so good you could spend your life studying it

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Pure kino

        The Russian elite at the time were westernized globalists who quite literally enslaved the Russian people

        A good book, in its second half often interrupted by seething repetitive pseud essays

        Yeah, if you skip the second epilogue you won't be missing out on much

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          You talk like it's hard to concieve Russian elite enslaving their populace despite doing that exact thing now

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        A lot of European aristocracy spoke French for a long time because it was considered the only civilized lingua franca in Europe (and it remained the European lingua franca for a lot longer than people seem to realize these days, English as a worldwide lingua franca is a relatively recent phenomenom). What we now consider their national languages were just peasant babble as far as the aristocracy was concerned, pivoting away from french to their common tongues was usually done either because of a break in relations with France or, later on, nationalist movements.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The best soap opera you will ever read

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    A good book, in its second half often interrupted by seething repetitive pseud essays

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      For a LONG but worthwhile ride.

      What essays do you mean? The ones about his takes on history and war? Those were pretty cool, you moron.

      That would be Don Quixote and next to this probably

      >That would be Don Quixote
      This shit was so good. He wrote in the foreword of the 2nd part that people complained about the short story inside of the story, but I almost liked that more lol. I mean the one where the guy told his friend to seduce his wife to test her.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Ignore the seethe epilogue at the end. For the amount of people the French lost in their invasion by rights it should be THEM seething about it. Instead it’s usually straightforward tragedy when French writers talk about it, little to no ressentiment to be seen, and much fewer mental gymnastics. My head cannon is the whole section is more a reflection of the seethe from the Crimean War which Tolstoy actually fought in and saw Russia lose. But all that being said yeah it’s still a masterpiece

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    There is a subreddit, that did a chapter a day: r/ayearofwarandpeace. Lots of helpful study material, although I guess it might be abandoned now.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      some people still use it. IQfy tried to read this book but of course it was too demanding for most people

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I read it with IQfy

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >There is a subreddit, that did a chapter a day
      I hate morons that misuse commas like this

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        God, me too, there's nothing I, hate more than misused, commas.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The greatest novel of all time

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      That would be Don Quixote and next to this probably

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Someone has to do it so I will say it then: Anna Karenina is the better book.
    No constant pseudo-science enlightened rants about the moving of peoples in whatever directions.
    No whining and seething about Napoleon.
    Did the elite society description better.
    Had the more interesting characters.

    The only thing that's not in Anna Karenina and is done outstandingly well is the analysis of the weird family life of the Bolknoskys, particularly Marya.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    A fantastic story with some "old guy ranting about history" chapters thrown in.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Sonya deserved better

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >deserved better
      Many such cases in Russian literature

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I could have saved her, bros…

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    for me it's Anna Karenina

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    what am I in for?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      The most underrated novel of all time

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        It has the name Leo Tolstoy written on the cover, it can't possibly be underrated

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          On the contrary, it has Leo Tolstoy on the cover, it can't possibly be rated highly enough.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          It’s largely unread these days. But at the time it was actually Tolstoy’s most popular work. Decidedly inferior to his other 2 long novels but still better than anything the next 1000 writers could come up with in their whole lives

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I think his late era Christian/Anarchist works are definitely underrated; those are essential, Tolstoy's teachings are among the best, but he hardly gets any play, its too controversial; were he a good boy, they would've made him a saint, or given him that Nobel Prize he was nominated for, or even just remembered him among all the humanitarians he inspired (like Gandhi and MLK); never heard a whisper of old Lev not once growing up though.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            It doesn’t make sense to me that his contributions to peace activism aren’t that famous these days even though he was the driving force behind Gandhi. They literally sent letters to each other and Gandhi lived on a Tolstoyan commune

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I read War and Peace in a difficult spot in life and it legitimately changed my life. Its a wonderful book, deeply religious but not overtly so. I wouldn't skip anything, the "seething rants" conplained about above are part of its charm.

    I love Tolstoy but don't think he ever topped this. Anna Karenina is good, resurection is good, hadji murad is good, but war and peace stands above them all. Its interesting he came to hate it at the end of his life. Look up his calendar of wisdom project, he felt that was his most important work.

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Tolstoy thread? I read this collection of 4 of his novellas
    >The Kreutzer Sonata
    Fascinating story, very complex although on the surface it seems didactic, always think about it after I read it. Tolstoy drops some nuclear redpills on women, men and marriage. Overly Christian to a fault.
    >Family Happiness
    Absolutely magnificent writing, crushingly realistic message, loses steam towards the end though and wraps up too fast
    >The Devil
    Basically a Christian psychological thriller. Very reminiscent of Dostoevsky. Not quite as much depth as the earlier stories but immensely entertaining and impactful with its message about lust
    >Father Sergius
    Clearly a commentary on his own self as he transformed into a celebrity Christian activist in his last decades. Flawlessly written except the ending which is a bit abrupt

    Overall, loved these stories. Though they’re blunt with their moral messages and that may turn some people off. Especially Kreutzer Sonata.

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    What's the best french translation?

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Depression and sadness, once you've read it.
    Because you'll never read anything as good

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      It was the first book I read as an adult trying to get in to reading and I very much felt that I spoiled myself by starting with the best, but since then I've been very fortunate to read Charterhouse of Parma which I like at least as much, and Goethe's Faust and Rousseau's Confessions both of which I like probably a little bit better

      God, me too, there's nothing I, hate more than misused, commas.

      I easily hate blacks more

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I need to read Stendhal.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I mean, there's always his other works (some of which surpass W&P) and Balzac, Flaubert, Stendhal, Sand, Sola, Linna and Strindberg.
      I felt pretty depressed too after I read it but then I discovered that there are more than like 10 authors out there.

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Pure kinography

  17. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    well written and translated period soap opera. It's not deep, just long.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      cringe

  18. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    A cozy book that should have been much longer.

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