What are humanity's options for a universally accepted currency? Energy tokens? Crypto?

What are humanity's options for a universally accepted currency? Energy tokens? Crypto?

Something that a person can earn as a wage working on Earth, go to mars or the moon or some shit, and use that same currency to buy a snickers bar or something

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Lasers, Imagine how cool your wallet is going to look

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      real

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Physical: Gold.
    Internet: Monero, because having all your transactions in the open is utterly fricking moronic.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      pray tell, we bring over one of those asteroids with 18 quintillion dollars worth of precious metals, price of gold crashes through the floor, we need a new currency now

      as far as I can see, monero doesn't have a fixed supply limit so same problem as gold

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >muh gold asteroid
        idk not my problem. on the other hand, by the time we can mine asteroids, the size of the economy and the population might grow so much, a few asteroids worth of gold might be needed to keep good accessible for all.
        >monero supply
        can't change the mining rate. monero has a constant predefined tail emission of 0.6 per block corresponding to 0.8% inflation per year (that's half of gold's) at the highest and constantly decreasing. eventually balancing out with the coin loss rate, or ignoring that, asymptotically approaching zero. so no asteroid scenario for monero.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          i think there's a relatively low chance monero becomes a real currency. the world is still skeptical as-is about bitcoin, which happens to be the most widely accepted crypto. monero and most of the other altcoins are, as far as i can tell, seen as the poor man's speculative asset

          as for the gold, maybe so but that doesn't solve some of gold's issues, namely transportation. if the muh gold asteroid is found and the supply of gold goes up by like 10%, we find ourselves transporting an extremely dense metal whose value just dropped by a significant margin

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            i use monero to anonymously buy things like vps and vpn over tor. no way i use bitcoin for that or any other crypto. monero actually offers value in that it's anonymous internet money. nothing else offers that, crypto or not. it's what's used on darknet drug markets too. it's battle tested against law enforcement. i admit it is niche as frick and will probably remain for weird nerds. normies don't give a frick about privacy. as for speculation, it's the most boring least speculative crypto ever. flat as frick. it's literally just anonymous internet money, that's what i love about it. when money goes into monero it disappears. meanwhile other cryptos snitch everything you do to the cent and the second, with the whole relationship graph to boot. at that point why even bother? just use paypal or bank transfers. they miss the point. then they talk about shit like "welcoming crypto regulation". imagine if torrent sites talked about "welcoming piracy regulation" lmao. all other crypto including bitcoin larpers don't give a frick about having non-cucked internet money. they're out to make money by dumping their bags on another sucker when the number goes up.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >flat as frick
            i mean, just googling monero/usd seems like it's pretty volatile? is that flat by crypto standards? but that's besides the point of the thread

            i am also concerned about monero's supposed ASIC-resistance as well as the lack of a supply limit. does that mean the monero dystopia is one where we have country-sized amounts of energy being used to mine this currency using inefficient, expensive hardware?

            i'm open to the idea of monero being the embodiment of satoshi nakomoto's ideal digital e-money, i'm not trying to fud

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >is that flat by crypto standards
            kek yes. or at least not very interesting.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >monero's supposed ASIC-resistance
            In Bitcoin mining, you calculate a relatively simple algorithm, SHA-256. ASICs are chips that can do nothing but calculate this algorithm. When it comes to hashes per watt, they outclass every other device. You have to have an ASIC or your mining is meaningless.
            The next level, like in Litecoin and in Ethereum (before PoS), you still have one algorithm but it's made more complex. There is nothing that inherently prevents ASICs.
            The final step (to be a bit wienery) is Monero's RandomX, which is not a single algorithm. Instead, a new algorithm is generated based on the hash of the last block, an unpredictable random value. This algorithm then has instructions in it that a CPU would do. Integers math, floating point math, conditional branches, memory access. The crucial thing is how the algorithm changes unpredictably. RandomX is not a proof of doing one static algorithm as work. Instead it is a proof of general purpose computation work. A good RandomX "ASIC" is necessarily a good CPU.

            What does this mean? Me as an example: I mine Monero on my mid tier Ryzen PC and my old i7 PC I repurposed as a home server. Yes when to comes to raw output my 2 measly CPU are nothing compared to a professional mining farm with 1000s, but the crucial thing is they mine in the same order of magnitude when in comes to hashes per watt, and I didn't have to spend money on them just to start mining. I already have the CPUs. Compare to Bitcoin where you need to first buy an ASIC costing thousands of dollars that can do nothing else and will become an obsolete paper weight in a few years. Safe to say I don't mine Bitcoin.

            My Monero mining pays for its electricity cost plus a few cents a day profit. Another thing is, the electricity is not even really wasted in my case because it's effectively a space heater right now (that pays for itself).

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >lack of a supply limit
            This has nothing to do with having to mine it. Mining keeps the network running. When Bitcoin supply turns constant (0 block reward) it still has to be mined! In such a case miners will only earn from transaction fees (which opens a can of worms Monero tries to avoid with tail emissions).

            There is frequent misunderstanding about this. The mining itself does not earn you money. Blocks are mined at a constant interval. Each block mined pays out a block reward + transaction fees. It's not something that changes depending on how hard you mine. How hard people mine stems from competitive economic balance of cost vs reward.

            >country-sized amounts of energy
            From the papers I've seen it's about 0.8% of world's electricity in a scenario crypto really takes off. Let's say 1%. Are there countries that use 1% of worlds electricity? For sure. You can also make comparisons with the energy used by Christmas lights being country sized to make it seem ridiculous.
            The real question is this: Are you willing to spend 1% of world's electricity on unfrickable-with money? I say yes. Many will say no. Idealistically only the people who say yes matter in the equation.
            >inefficient, expensive hardware
            Definitely not expensive as I explained with ASICs. Especially the cost of entry. Regular off the shelf hardware.
            The specific efficiency kinda cancels out in the equation because it ends up just being cost per time spent for network security (compared to the total assumed value of the network). Mining globally getting more or less efficient doesn't change it.

            An alternative to mining, proof of stake, long story short, is central banking and rent seeking with extra steps and opens a whole can of worms for the sake of placating environment hysteria, so I'm not even going to talk about it. Yes, this one also requires frickton of money for a validating node.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            what the frick are the areas on the section of that circle?

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >the lack of a supply limit
            that's a good thing if you want a currency and not an asset.
            Currencies MUST depreciate in value, because it incentivizes trading them for goods and services rather than holding onto them. After all, why would you spend a dollar on goods and services that you can sell for $1.50 in a year when that same dollar appreciates in value more quickly? There's no incentive to circulate money, because there is no arbitrage opportunities.
            This is basic macroeconomic theory computer nerds like Sakamoto never learned, which is why all crypto will fail on the promise for all eternity.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            That's nonsense made up to avoid admitting that money lending is devastating to the economy. What actually happens is that too much of something is made, people don't want more, its prices crash, and it wouldn't be a big problem if its production didn't run on credit.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >the lack of a supply limit
            that's a good thing if you want a currency and not an asset.
            Currencies MUST depreciate in value, because it incentivizes trading them for goods and services rather than holding onto them. After all, why would you spend a dollar on goods and services that you can sell for $1.50 in a year when that same dollar appreciates in value more quickly? There's no incentive to circulate money, because there is no arbitrage opportunities.
            This is basic macroeconomic theory computer nerds like Sakamoto never learned, which is why all crypto will fail on the promise for all eternity.

            Also, obviously:
            Transaction fees are fricking moronic, why would you ever do such a thing.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Unfortunately 99% of people using monero are criminals and pedos. It makes it really easy for those kind of people to do what they do. If it was 1% crims and pedos then it's probably worth trying to fix it somehow, but when almost everyone using it is a criminal then it can't last, and it shouldn't last

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            What if I told you there are more pedos and criminals using USD than Monero

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The only thing that I can think of that works regardless of the state of the world, are still useful and won't rot away are simple tools like hammers, nails, saws, cargo carts etc

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Too late for both, they're already trying to force all transactions to run strictly through israeli banks

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    energy backed is the only option.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      how would that work tho? batteries are capacitors are garbage, so energy as a commodity isn't gonna work until we get perfect energy storage

      leaving us with energy certificates or derivatives, which need a central authority to back them up, which has its own issues and risks

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    usd

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    candy

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Crypto is for privacy and scamming people. If you use it for anything else you are a moron. It will never be stable enough to be a contender
    Actual answer: usd

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      what, cash? or digital? alot of overhead for either one. transportation for the former, privatized centralization for the latter

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The US dollar.

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