What are some genuinely organic and semi-successful slave revolts?

Cause the more I looked into it, I realized how flawed the presented narrative was. Same with the American Revolution, most slave revolts were usually instigated by foreign powers. In the case of Haiti, it was the revolutionary government in France or an invading army that allowed the slaves to join in as an auxiliary force, as the Persians did. However, I couldn't find any evidence of an actual organic slave uprising that was successful or even semi-successful

Tip Your Landlord Shirt $21.68

DMT Has Friends For Me Shirt $21.68

Tip Your Landlord Shirt $21.68

  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    In what way was Spartacus not "organic"? That said, I've always considered Spartacus to be the only case of a "grass roots" rebellion of any kind, with the definition of "grass roots" being that the rebellion could have happened in any meaningful sense without foreign involvement

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    IE in Finland

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I don't think it's even possible to make an army out of slaves, but a competent commander could probably organize them into informal militias

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    1776. Nothing will ever surpass The American Revolution.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Slave Revolt
      >The American Revolution

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        No he’s right if you really think about it. Granted, it’s a hardcore libertarian talking point but still.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          It's absolutely not.
          >It had the support of the wealthiest men in the colonies
          >Had direct financial and military aid from France
          >The war ended up being won by the Continental Army
          >Before that, it was mostly freeborn farmers organized in militia units

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Okay but both Rothbard and Hoppe literally talk about this in their writings

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >No he’s right if you really think about it. Granted, it’s a hardcore libertarian talking point but still.

          Cool story, George the Slimy Taxman.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Complete opposite intended response to what I typed. Never said I was opposed to the uprising.
            It’s literally a Rothbard and Hoppe, especially Hoppe talking point.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      A STAR-SPANGLED AMEN, BROTHER

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >During the revolutionary era, Masons of note included George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, James Otis, and Paul Revere

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Franklin left the freemasons. The only founding father to do so. Because he believed them to be too hard on religion, which he believed had more benefits for society than ills.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >/pol/tards think this is some kind of argument while completely whitewashing Jesuit priests.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Are you really going to defend a secret order of wealthy and powerful men whose goals were to manipulate society into following their values and ideologies?

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The Spartacus Revolt is my favourite example. This slave army of 70,000 rebelled in 71 BC in Ancient Sicily. Led by Spartacus, the slaves gained initial success and controlled some Italian territory, but they were eventually defeated by the Roman army. However, it took 13 years of bloody warfare for the Roman Republic to quell the revolt.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      A popular myth about this and the Zanj is that they were against slavery, but they weren't (the zanj themselves had slaves).They killed tons of innocent civilians. And as Kubrick noted (he disliked his spartacus movie for being controlled by Kirk Douglas and for being inaccurate) why didn't spartacus and his crew flee north and hide somewhere in what is now Germany or France?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >why didn't spartacus and his crew flee north and hide somewhere in what is now Germany or France?
        I assume they thought they could take Rome, the fact that the bulk of the Roman Legions were in Illyria and Spain and when they finally came back, it was the end of the rebellion

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    A bunch of slaves revolted, got together and started liberating others in Brazil, they had their own colonies for a while, or something like that.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palmares_(quilombo)
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zumbi

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Members of quilombos often returned to plantations or towns to encourage their former fellow Africans to flee and join the quilombos. If necessary, they brought others by force and sabotaged plantations.
      >Anyone who came to quilombos on their own were considered free, but those who were captured and brought by force were considered slaves and continued to be so in the new settlements. They could be considered free if they were to bring another captive to the settlement.
      >Since small in numbers, men were also recruited to join Palmares and even Portuguese soldiers fleeing forced recruitment were sought out.[3]
      >Although it is often argued that the inhabitants of Palmares defended themselves using the martial art form called capoeira, there is no documentary evidence that the residents of Palmares actually used this method of fighting.
      >They were able to acquire guns by trading with the Portuguese and by allowing small-holding cattle raisers to use their land.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I actually cannot recall any aside from maybe Spartacus' revolt.

      Would not call this a slave revolt in the proper sense. Maroons just fled and lived in shanty towns on the sticks. They did not revolt.

      The largest slave revolt in history was organic. Lenin instigated the revolt. Now before you say a Russian serf wasn't a slave, yeah they were. Still are so the revolt against one owner just ensured enslavement by the next.

      Serfdom was Abolished 56 years before the Russian revolution.

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Mamluks

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The largest slave revolt in history was organic. Lenin instigated the revolt. Now before you say a Russian serf wasn't a slave, yeah they were. Still are so the revolt against one owner just ensured enslavement by the next.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >The largest slave revolt in history was organic. Lenin instigated the revolt. Now before you say a Russian serf wasn't a slave, yeah they were. Still are so the revolt against one owner just ensured enslavement by the next.

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >The largest slave revolt in history was organic. Lenin instigated the revolt. Now before you say a Russian serf wasn't a slave, yeah they were. Still are so the revolt against one owner just ensured enslavement by the next.

  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    what? the revolutionary government in france did not instigate the haitian revolution, the insecurity about the future of the colony just created an opportunity the revolution exploited.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      they literally sent an expeditionary force to free the slaves

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        after the slaves had already taken over a big chunk of the island. and to enfranchise free blacks, not to free the slaves

  11. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Haiti

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *