what are some good recommendations for someone wanting to get into ancient greek literature?

what are some good recommendations for someone wanting to get into ancient greek literature?
specifically fiction, as it seems less discussed than plato, aristotle, etc.

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  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Homer is the greatest Greek writer.
    Then you look for others. But there are many Ancient Greeks with few fragments.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      oh yeah i've bought the iliad and the odessy

      who else would you recommend?

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        You will be doing yourself a great disservice if you don’t read the Greek plays. Sophocles, Aristophanes and Euripides are masters.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          https://i.imgur.com/YcM6axg.jpeg

          Read a book on greek mythology to get what they mostly refe, read the Illiad and the Odyssee, then Herodotus Historia, read the dramas. Sophocles, Euripides...

          thanks a bunch!

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    start with the greeks

  3. 2 weeks ago
    s10241875

    >what are some good recommendations for someone wanting to get into ancient greek literature?
    I'll be super original: read more. I think about the context. How it is perceived by you and how it might have been accepted at the time of creation. To do this, study history.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      when did you show up

      • 2 weeks ago
        s10241875

        ?

        I'm trying to find books to get for a friend
        and she doesn't want to read essays so idrk what to do
        I'm not massively interested in ancient greek history myself so I don't really want to study it just to find a good book
        but context is a good point

        >"I'm trying to find books to get for a friend
        and she doesn't want to read essays so idrk what to do"
        I don’t understand, what do I have to do with this?
        Then give a friend a book that you like and then borrow it from your friend to “read a little.”

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          yeah no sorry I'm moronic
          ignore that
          I was trying say something but nvm

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I'm trying to find books to get for a friend
      and she doesn't want to read essays so idrk what to do
      I'm not massively interested in ancient greek history myself so I don't really want to study it just to find a good book
      but context is a good point

      • 2 weeks ago
        the friend

        hiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          hiiiii

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          when did you show up

  4. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Read a book on greek mythology to get what they mostly refe, read the Illiad and the Odyssee, then Herodotus Historia, read the dramas. Sophocles, Euripides...

  5. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Start with Bulfinch's Mythology. It gives a comprehensive summary of Greek mythology (though it tends towards Roman nomenclature, i.e. Mercury instead of Hermes, Saturn instead of Kronos, etc.) but it constitutes pretty much the entire compendium of classical antiquity.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      thanks sm 🙂

  6. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous
    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      oh yeah thanks!

  7. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I don't really know what you mean by "fiction". There are some ancient novels like Callirhoe. But regardless, start with Homer then Herodotus, then read some Plutarch lives. That will give you a good background.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >I don't really know what you mean by "fiction". There are some ancient novels like Callirhoe.
      Fiction applies to poetry and theatre as well.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      oh okay, sick yeah
      by fiction, I was referring to novels, poetry and plays mainly
      probably could've worded it better though

  8. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Hesiod>Homer>Aeschylus>Sophocles>Euripedes>Sappho>Plutarch>etc.,.
    And if you find you enjoy them, consider learning the language.

  9. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Homer, Hesiod, Aeschylus and Sophocles are the big four you should knock out of the way at the start.

  10. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I started with the Greeks many years ago
    I read the Iliad first, the Robert gayles edition had sufficient notes and list of characters that I didn't find it difficult to follow
    Then I read the Odyssey, again translated by Robert gayles
    If your edition doesn't have good notes it might be a bit confusing
    Perhaps I'm a bit unusual but I loved the Iliad and was a bit let down by the Odyssey which I didn't enjoy as much
    At that point I was committed to the mythology and so I read Hesiod and Theognis
    I decided to pick up an edition of Plato, Plato: Five Dialogues, and I read through that
    Personally I think philosophy is kind of a waste of time if you aren't going to commit to it but I still thoroughly enjoyed reading Plato
    The playwrights are essential
    I read Sophocles first, then Euripides, followed by Aeschylus and finally Aristophanes
    I think you owe it to yourself to read as much of the playwrights as you can
    Prometheus Bound is bizarrely amazing and I'm ashamed to say that I'm a big fan of Euripides
    No interest in reading Aristotle but Constitution of the Athenians was very interesting
    I still recommend that you read the Historians btw

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >ashamed to say that I'm a big fan of Euripides
      No shame there. Euripides is amazing. The Bachanae is one of the top tragedies.

  11. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The tragic plays are a good way to see a broad spectrum.
    Euripides has the most plays but Sophocles and Aeschylus are just as great and important.
    Hesiod has an excellent poem overview of myth lore/history.
    The Library of Apollodorus as goes over everything but is dryer. You'll see pretty much every name and event there but not dramatic or descriptive.
    There is also Ovid but he is Roman and changes things for example the man who was cursed to turn into a stag then eaten by his own hunting dogs has his crime change in Ovid's work.
    Then there are the epics. Iliad and Odyssey of course but there's also The Argonautica about Jason and the Argonauts.
    If you want more then the Homeric Hymns and the Orphic Hymns are nice too.

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