What are you reading?

What are you reading and what are your thoughts on it?

Give me hope, IQfy. Please tell me there are some that actually read

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  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I picked up this recently. Finished the Emerald Lotus half. It was pretty neat.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      How old are you?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        43

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          The frick are you doing here? 43 on IQfy. Move on. Jesus.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I’m 42 myself. Settle down, kid,

            Anyways here’s my list of books

            The Camp of the Saints
            I shouldn't be laughing but it's really funny at times.
            Rereading The Republic for the umpteenth time. I really hope Dr Segure isn't dead and can release his opus on it. Come on take Chomsky first instead.

            >I really hope Dr Segure isn't dead
            Son, I got some bad news for you….

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            FRICK
            his fat daughter better release his Plato notes.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I was here first

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Could you suggest a better literature forum?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Pretty much everywhere else

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Reddit? No. Twitter? No. I mean, I know this place sucks, but where to go? Wikipedia? No. All forums are dead.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            If you honestly want a forum around reading literature then IQfy is easily the worst

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            For frick sake, just name one, you goof

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            reddit, twatter, an alumni reading group for your alma mater, the literature network

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            So either a bunch of women or a bunch of gays forcing themselves to read pomo kitsch

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            What type of literary criticism you see here that is so special?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I'm not the one you ask this to, but if I want criticism I read newspapers and magazines. A forum is not for well-informed criticism, it's about discussion and hearing from other readers, to hear what's on people's mind. It's sad that no one can name another forum. On google I find some forums, but the activity is near zero or below. If you are the one saying that this is the worst forum, I suppose you know better ones, so why not name them?

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Your post

    The New Rhetoric

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The Camp of the Saints
    I shouldn't be laughing but it's really funny at times.
    Rereading The Republic for the umpteenth time. I really hope Dr Segure isn't dead and can release his opus on it. Come on take Chomsky first instead.

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The Essays of Montaigne. He's such a clear communicator and I admire that about his writing.

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I like history books and I’m reading this. Some parts are interesting and good to know, but also pretty boring (colonial America isn’t my favorite era). Lots of shit about trade over and over again to the point of being a bit redundant. Same with shit about natives getting dunked on. The author also leans progressive and describes some events in certain terms and in certain ways to imply praise or derision. I probably wouldn’t recommend it honestly. The only redeeming quality is that it also talks about the history of non-English-speaking colonies, like the Spanish SW, the Caribbean, Canada, and even Russian Alaska (but I haven’t gotten to that part yet.
    6/10

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      How good is this? I plan to start a crash course on American revolutionary history soon.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Well, like I explained in my post, it has a lot of information, but it’s generally boring, being a bit dense and repetitive in my view. The author also has progressive biases. It’s not that bad though.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Nta but I’ll be honest, a political slant of any kind kills history discussion for me. Once I notice one stretch or distortion I assume everything else was just one I didn’t catch.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Well, it’s not the most overt bias in the world. It comes out in some of the language he uses to describe things. The worst part was near the beginning when he described why deadly disease was more prevalent amongst Europeans instead of the Indians. He describes Europeans as literally dirty and smelly compared to the Indians in a way where he’s trying to recast the traditional portray of Indians as savages, like there’s a score to settle there. It kind of took me out of it a bit and the rest of the book wasn’t as blatant as that, but he clearly uses language that indicates his political biases one way or another. His language makes certain events seem obviously good and others obviously bad, from his viewpoint.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            NTA, but it is a fact that Europeans brought diseases to North America that killed many natives. Smallpox, tuberculosis, measles, among others, were things that transferred and the natives weren't equipped for it.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Yes, I understand that. I’m not disputing that fact. I’m taking issue with the author’s characterizations and moral slants.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I don't believe it. Most of modern medicine and biology are fake btw (check Rockefeller Medicine Man).
            I think the Native Americans were systematically culled. They had strong immune systems. They didn't die from disease.

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Salman Rushdie's Midnight's Children
    Tristram Shandy-ish. Very funny. Quite magical. The Anglo-Indian linguistic hybridity whatsitsname autism is annoying though.

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Im currently reading All Quiet on the Western Front. Its so visceral that its almost nauseous. But pretty good and its giving me a new perspective on combat, without all the hollywoodian heroism.

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It's deliciously creepy. The audio book gives the stories some nice character as well.

    read alone at night/10

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Musashi by Eiji Yoshikawa. I watched the Shogun TV show and wanted more, and this book takes place right after the end of Shogun.

  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The Tribe that Lost its Head by Monsarrat

    Very mediocre. It seems like Monsarrat just wasn't very good at writing non nautical fiction. The Kapillan of Malta is a possible exception but a small island nation is still pretty nautical.

  11. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Seminar on Youth

    Barbino is literally me, except for being the worst rent boy in history and catching syphilis on the streets of Paris for free. It's a very amusing kind of self loathing nihilism that does what it says on the can, he's fricking moronic and knows it and lives life to the fullest in the dumbest and nastiest possible ways. I think somewhere in here is in fact a paradigm of youth and something straightgays can relate to and learn from. The prose is also really tasteful and poetic as far as rambling, neurotic autofiction goes.

  12. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Omensetter's Luck
    Has a few too many lyrical lulls to puff uo the wordcount of what would otherwise be a novella. The strong scenes are nonetheless so powerful--the end of Pimber's story, and Furber's sermon... I'll finish it tonight.

  13. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >American Pastoral by Roth
    I am both surprised and not surprised this isn’t more popular here. Why I’m not surprised should be obvious. Why I am surprised is that Roth seems to hold similar values and opinions to a lot of this board, at least halfway through the book.

    It is about a man who was a perfect chad and golden boy throughout his life. Famous in high school as an athlete. Inherits his father’s glove making business and is successful and expands it. Marries Miss New Jersey. They start a cattle business on the side that is successful. They have children. He is the perfect all American man..

    But his stuttering teenage daughter had a difficult time with herself. She latched onto the Vietnam War and became radicalized. Roth portrays her as a /misc/tard would a communist. She is very unlikeable. She plants a bomb and a man dies so she runs away in hiding

    This episode was the defining moment in the main character’s life. He hated what his daughter did and became and wants to disown her at times. Buts she’s still his daughter and he feels some guilt as maybe he did something wrong. It affects his marriage, his relationship with the community, and his peace of mind

    Lots of themes are touched on, some of which are very prevalent now like radicalization/extremism and how it happens, race relations, class divisions, the changing landscape of the USA and politics from ww2 to the 90’s, fatherhood, marriage, getting old and dying.

    My only other experience with Roth was Portnoy’s Complaint and some short stories and AP is way different. It’s a rich, complex book that is easy to read. Definitely one of the contenders for “great American novel” post ww2. I plan to read more Roth in the future but I’m unsure where to go to

    >Understanding the I Ching by Wilhelm and Kafka’s Letters to Milena

    Love Kafka and the I Ching so like both these books. Just like Kafka’s diary his letters give me more respect for the man as he was much deeper than his fiction seems to hint at, and I say this as someone who loves his fiction. I find the I Ching fascinating and a book of lectures on it increases my understanding of it; not much more I can say

  14. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I'm reading Ulysses, this spring I finished Gravity's Rainbow, so I figured I could finish the meme trilogy. It is way more ambitious and difficult to read than I was expecting, but it's also pretty enjoyable. I know I'm going to have to come back to it later to appreciate more of the references because probably half are going over my head, but the ones I get are pretty satisfying.

  15. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The Divine Comedy, Ciardi translation. It's far more entertaining than I had suspected. Just really enjoyable and fun, very vivid and interesting and grotesque when it needs to be and beautiful when it needs to be and often actually pretty funny.

  16. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I've been reading through Foucault's main works. Right now I am on Madness & Civilization. It's not bad, I like it, but as I understand, it's considered his top work, and I really liked Discipline & Punish more. I thought D&P was brilliant.

  17. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The Brothers Karamazov. Its the first time I read a book with such a high pagecount. Im currently somewhere in the middle. I like it up till now but I dont find it to be of the same caliber as Notes from the Underground. The christian ideas that are explored have definitely captured my interest but can be a little overbearing sometimes.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      "Christianity is the religion of self-destruction" - that hits hard, doesn't it?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I find interesting that in Christianity, there's this thing about you being a sheep, but in Vajrayana Buddhism, they say you're a tiger who's been raised to be a sheep.

        I would rather be a tiger.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous
          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Imagine tackling her and smashing the guitar and everyone starts clapping because she's bad

  18. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Got all this bullshit on my pl8 rn.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I’ve always heard Akira manga was better than the film but I found I disagreed to be honest. Nausicaa is a better example of the more far reaching manga being better. Not that I’d say Akira is bad by any means just that the film distills it pretty well.

      Is that the color version or the black and white?

  19. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Rreading Hunger by Hamsun. Forgot how great this book is. Seems like my luck is just as bad as when I read it before, although I can no way compare my blights to the one detailed in the book. Makes me appreciate living in a first world country in the 21st century.

  20. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Just finished reading Anna Karenina by Tolstoy. Took me about a month to get through it and it kept me going but I thought it was just alright.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I read that one in 8 days and loved it

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I stopped reading AK because I took issue with Tolstoy's characterization fairly early in the story, but I eventually revisited it and I'm glad I did.

  21. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Im about to crack open Mishimas Confessions of a Mask

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      this image could be used to justify Total Discordzoomie Death

  22. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I’m working my way through the rat series by Murakami, had a thread on it the other day and got some other reccs. Once I finish dance dance dance though I’ll take a break from him and delve into a massive short story collection by Richard Yates. I also have a Raymond carver short story collection, cathedral, but I’ll be honest I didn’t love the few that I read.

    I have a Paul O’Neill biography I’ve saved for beach reading since distractions make reading actual books a chore while there.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      What We Talk About... is better, depending on who you ask. You see him in Murakami's style more than themes. Also give Elephant Vanishes a go.

      https://i.imgur.com/UTx2YY8.jpeg

      I read the short story "Rain" by W. Somerset Maugham yesterday evening. It was pretty good, I think I would read some more from him, I have around 50.

      Razor's Edge was great.

      https://i.imgur.com/hAUE5lg.jpeg

      So far, I don't really have an opinion. I like the day-to-day descriptions of this hobbled-together group of writers and poets and the intertwining of their lives, but nothing really striking me worth noting yet.

      The man had beef with big name buttholes in LatAm literature who used government ties to silence anything they didn't like. There's an element of that in there. The man liked reading of a certain kind and it's one of those novels for writers that deep readers will get more out of, but I think it's more of an intellectual curiosity for anyone other than technicians, who get a deeper layer of humor from it.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Yeah I hear that. It was plain from the beginning that it is informed from his personal life, and I've started to see the sociopolitical backdrop in the story. I'm not much of a deep reader but fortunately I like stories about writers lol

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I haven't even read much of it but reading and reading about LatAm lit means that I run into constant Bolaño quotes and anecdotes. He was funny as shit too.

  23. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I read the short story "Rain" by W. Somerset Maugham yesterday evening. It was pretty good, I think I would read some more from him, I have around 50.

  24. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Book of Lost Tales I and the Collected Works of George Rawlinson.

  25. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The Topology of Violence by Byung-Chul Han. I'm a little over halfway. Han's books are pretty much just a series of academic essays in which he reports on what others think and then derives a milquetoast conclusion from them, but I find them valuable to read nonetheless since I don't see myself ever reading the full works of Hegel, Schmitt, Arendt, Agamben, Zizek, etc. at any point.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Precisely why I like him, he expresses and distills very well

      https://i.imgur.com/4UdkV3V.jpeg

      What are you reading and what are your thoughts on it?

      Give me hope, IQfy. Please tell me there are some that actually read

      >Gomorrah by Roberto Saviano
      Very well-written and extremely well-researched without being overwhelming, which is usually an issue with journalism books. It's fascinating to see how deeply the Camorra is entrenched in the crime economy not only of Europe but of the whole world. The little autobiographic touches are nice too

      >The Iliad
      Surprisingly fun, once battles begin and the gods start bickering. I love the use of language and all the patronyms

  26. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I was reading Gravity's Rainbow but I've lost interest in it. I think I need a simple, easy read to get me back into it, maybe a horror book that's just meant to be scary. Any recs?

  27. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I'm in the middle of Gravity's Rainbow and I started binge-reading a YA novel a couple of days ago just to remind me what a normal book is like. I'm on the last stretch, once I finish it's back to GR

  28. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Halfway through time regained. I found myself really blazing through the prisoner and alebertine gone but this one is way too dense

  29. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >The Brothers Karamazov

    All of the story vignettes though important seemed to me to have no larger purpose at all. Like Alyosha being hit by stones, or the various people who came to be blessed by Zosima.

    But slowly they unravel further. For example how the child is actually important to a plot between Katerina Ivanonva and Alyosha; how the fruition of the wishes of one woman leads to doubts amongst the monastery and in Father Ferapont. I hope we see more of that guy, only read the titular chapter on him so far.

    I wonder how much dostoevsky was writing for social change and how much whether he was concerned with writing a good story. 'Cause all his works seems to have certain sections where they talk long windedly about currently important social issues, like in C&P/Demons I don't remember which an influential pamphlet called "What is to be done" was the crux of the debate.

    Whatever he wrote must've been grounded in some reality, for chapters like "Women in Faith". And I'm surprised to see such devout religious people existed.

    I like alyosha because I always admire people with immense faith, in anything, religion, another person etc.

    I have been atheistic as far as I can remember (and I'm not claiming to be as cool as Ivan now ) so I never had faith in some God. Thus i always find people like Alyosha fascinating.

    His portryals of the people are genuinely realistic, I could imagine Fyodor and Muisov being the way they are in my head.

    I do wonder where the plot will go, for currently the Matter revolves around the weird love polygon of Katerina-Dmitri-Ivan-Grushenka-Fyodor.

    I might be a midwit, but I don't seem to see quite clearly yet how this book is the greatest Christian novel of all time. But I'll save my judgments until the much hyped "Grand Inquisitor" chapter.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      The Grand Inquisitor indeed deserves to be world famous, but I also thought the preceeding chapter, Rebellion, is like 90% as powerful.

  30. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    40pgs in and i don't know what to think apart from guessing that inception/paprika copied this. After this i am going to read lord of light.

  31. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The Recognition Sutras by Christopher Wallis.

    A tantric work, and it is spiritual ROCKET FUEL, but it is a commentary on a scripture aimed at those who have experienced awakening, so maybe you need to have experienced awakening yourself to get the ROCKET FUEL effect.

  32. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Started pic related.Enjoying it so far and how smooth the prose flows.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      seems fun, never read it, seen a review from betterthanfood I think not long ago

  33. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Article by Emerson, 'Books'. Also The Lights: Poems by Ben Lerner. And some more

  34. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    So far, I don't really have an opinion. I like the day-to-day descriptions of this hobbled-together group of writers and poets and the intertwining of their lives, but nothing really striking me worth noting yet.

  35. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    la horde du contrevent

  36. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I'm currentely reading this retelling of the Ramayana by R.K. Narayan, because I wanted to read the ramayana for a while now, but in it's original form it is way too big

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