What area do you guys think would have been the epicenters of civilization and agriculture during the Last Glacial Maximum if humanity was advanced en...

What area do you guys think would have been the epicenters of civilization and agriculture during the Last Glacial Maximum if humanity was advanced enough during this time period?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Mostly coastline based seaports, that sort of thing. Now all underwater or washed away by nowadays though due to the sea level rises when the ice melted.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Last Glacial Maximum
    no such thing

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I hadn't considered that. Interesting point.

      https://i.imgur.com/RHTLO33.jpg

      >What area do you guys think would have been the epicenters of civilization and agriculture during the Last Glacial Maximum if humanity was advanced enough during this time period?

      I don't understand the scientific jargon. Explain for a moron?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >I hadn't considered that. Interesting point.
        there weren't glacial maximum
        the polar region(and ice cap) moved around changing climate zones, it happened very rapidly, multiple times and was more recent than you think

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Woah, that's crazy.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            yeah
            the climate zones moved around with that

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            yeah, haha, wild

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          crust slip displacement is bullshit like flat earth levels of stupid.
          >but why
          because the viscosity of the mantel is way too high

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >because the viscosity of the mantel is way too high
            yes, now it is, maybe different story under changed sun activity - maybe big solar flare unlock it
            tbh I am not sure about the mechanic - the whole crust sliding round is fricking crazy - I am more of changing axis of rotation guy although that also would be happen if crust sliding is a thing

            yeah, haha, wild

            it would also cause very rapid( I am talking days maybe months or years) submerging and rising of large areas - imagine observing alps(or any young sharp mountains) getting up in few years instead of millions/billions of years

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Solar radiation of any intensity or spectrum range doesn't do anything to the viscosity of the mantle. Plate slip was plausible until geological surveys of the interior were inferred from seismic data triangulation.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >What area do you guys think would have been the epicenters of civilization and agriculture during the Last Glacial Maximum if humanity was advanced enough during this time period?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      WHITEKANDA FOREVER

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I am sorry that the truth is a bitter pill

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Sure my Whitekandian friend!

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      WE WUZ BUDDAS N SHIEET

      BUDDA WUZ A WHYTE MAN!!!

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        You mad about it?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Mad about what? Some albino Black person trailer trash larping as brown? hahahahahahahahahahaha

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >https://www.ncei.noaa.gov/maps/bathymetry/
      >https://gis.neom.com/portal/home/webmap/viewer.html?useExisting=1&layers=30e5fe3149c34df1ba922e6f5bbf808f
      As much as I wish Atlantis was real, the topographic and bathymetric data shows that the Mid-Atlantic Ridge is way too far below sea level for a landmass to have ever existed in that region. There's a couple of shallow spots that are less than 130m below sea level, and those would've been above sea level during the LGM, but that's about it. Take a look at the islands that exist today. The depth of the ocean starts to nosedive as soon as you leave the shore. If Atlantis did exist, it would've been an archipelago similar enough to Hawai'i. And since this archipelago would've been a thousand miles off the coast of Europe and Africa, the inhabitants wouldn't have been able to take advantage of trade and information transmission, so they'd be stuck in the stone age unless they were 130IQ freaks of nature. Even then, the lack of timber and metal would've stopped them from progressing very far.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Footnote: if you want to see some cool sunken landmasses that used to exist during the LGM, check out the Mascarene Plateau, northeast of Madagascar, and the Rockall Bank, northwest of Ireland.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          also

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        "ocean basis have responded isostatically by a significant amount to the loading and unloading of water associated with pleistocene glaciation" from the same infographic explains why the depth wasn't so deep back then.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          It's just not physically possible. The landmass depicted in the map is actually a kilometre and a half below sea level. The Mid-Atlantic Ridge was formed by a divergent plate boundary, I'll give you that, but the idea of a landmass sinking by that much in only 20,000 years is nothing short of fantasical.

          https://i.imgur.com/fwxG8wL.jpg

          also

          Zealandia is half a kilometre below sea level, and it's right beside a subduction zone. If anything, it would've been a bit deeper underwater back then.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >kilometre and a half below sea level
            I don't think you understand what isostatic rebound means or have an appreciation for the rate of change for such phenomenon.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            picture

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            yes, isostatic depression of the sea floor, especially concentrated at the deepest parts of the middle of the basins, was significant and led to deeper depths from sea level than otherwise would be expected due to only liquid water volume changes.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            as an interesting aside the described process would lead also to substantial volcanic activity in conjunction with the isostatic depression due to induced pressure changes within the mantle beneath the mid atlantic plate boundary. In other words, the volcanoes would have all been erupting like crazy during the sinking which could have taken thousands of years to complete

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            You didn't even look at the bathymetric map I shared in my first post, you dickhead.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        if the polar cap was in different place then probably earth axis of rotation was different too
        and effect of this would coastline looking complementary different

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          plate slip theory is bunk that became unworkable after

          Solar radiation of any intensity or spectrum range doesn't do anything to the viscosity of the mantle. Plate slip was plausible until geological surveys of the interior were inferred from seismic data triangulation.

          >geological surveys of the interior were inferred from seismic data triangulation

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    test

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      you failed
      black van was send to your location
      do not resists

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Civilisational development is determined by availability of auitavle plants and animals for domestication, not climate, hence why civilisation devwloped primeraly in somewhat hostile climates

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      The hostile climates also helped eveloping it, as people would have to organize in big groups to survive

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Is there any fossils records showing areas where such plants like cereals would have been abundant in this timeframe? I'm not asking for schizo theories about "lost civilizations". It's just an interesting thought experiment.

      do you want real discussion or schizo babbling which is already in the thread?

      We're on IQfy so it's probably impossible to not have the latter.

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    do you want real discussion or schizo babbling which is already in the thread?

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >What area do you guys think would have been the epicenters of civilization and agriculture during the Last Glacial Maximum if humanity was advanced enough during this time period?
    Most important would be the Persian Gulf civilization ancestral to Mesopotamia, Egypt, and the Indus.

    The origin of civilization.

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