What author resonates the most with you?

What author resonates the most with you?

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  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Honestly I’ve not encountered one yet

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I am the boulder, the barren wasteland of literary resonance, rolling through the empty canyon of my own vast ignorance. Not once have I found a piece of text to penetrate the dense rock of my intellect, to frick my mind with some semblance of emotional or intellectual impact. My spine is uncracked, not unlike the pristine books that lie untouched on my shelf—those poor souls gathering dust, waiting for something monumental, like my first stint with a hard-on over a clever metaphor.

      When I crack open a book, it's like watching a foreign film without subtitles. Joyce, Faulkner, Hemingway… their words flutter by like exotic dancers I can't afford to tip. I am the literary virgin, untouched by the carnal knowledge of good writing.

      I walk the hallowed halls of literature, an empty vessel, waiting to be filled with the spunk of wisdom, but alas, the ejaculation of knowledge misses me every time. I stand amidst the bukkake, mouth agape like a parched prostitute at an orgy of knowledge, yet still, my tongue laps at only the arid air.

      I squint at Shakespeare as if he were some cryptic troony in the dark corner of a strip club—I know there’s supposed to be something to admire, but all I end up with is confusion and a vague sense of being fricked over.

      Each classic is like a teeth-filled blowjob—a promise of pleasure met with a grimace-inducing chafe against my delicate understanding, leaving me to limp away sore and unsatisfied.

      So here I flop, an intellectual plankton adrift in the ocean of erudition, looking to be hit by the tsunami wave one might find in a dubstep drop—yet I contend with nothing but the anal exhale of my own mental constipation. Can someone ring a bell? Because there's certainly an empty belfry up in this skull.

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I'm not obsessed with anything.

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Alan Moore. Ironic, since I'm a white supremacist/national socialist.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      cringe

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        nah you are

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          it's still you

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Henry Miller. His works are the ones I would have liked to have written if I were from his time. I also later found out his favorite piece of music is also mine (Scriabin's 5th Piano Sonata).

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      my favourite novelist when i was 15, i remember fragment in Tropic of Capricorn where he described fricking israeli c**t with "tip of his wiener" or something like that, i never knew back then that literature can be like that. Version i borrowed from public library had this minimalistic drawing of sex or pussy or something, and i blushed when i gave it to young librarian - her hairs long and black, modest clothes but always with red lipstick, her voice deep and comforting - she was perfect woman, right then... Fuel for my first dreams of althoe love

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      He’s probably the writer that has spoken the most to me, but I’m not sure that he’s the writer I’d say is most similar to me, if that makes sense. I’ve always felt DH Lawrence was more of a kindred spirit

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Let us just for the moment feel the pulses ofUlyssesand of Miss Dorothy Richardson and M. Marcel Proust . . . IsUlyssesin his cradle? Oh, dear! What a grey face! . . . And M. Proust? Alas! You can hear the death-rattle in their throats. They can hear it themselves. They are listening to it with acute interest, trying to discover whether the intervals are minor thirds of major fourths. Which is rather infantile, really.

        So there you have the “serious” novel, dying in a very long-drawn-out fourteen-volume death-agony, and absorbedly, childishly interested in the phenomenon “Did I feel a twinge in my little toe, or didn’t I?” asks every character of Mr. Joyce or of Miss Richardson or M. Proust. Is my aura a blend of frankincense and orange pekoe and boot-blacking, or is it myrrh and bacon-fat and Shetland tweed? The audience round the death-bed gapes for the answer. And when, in a sepulchral tone, the answer comes and length, after hundreds of pages: “It is none of these, it is abysmal chloro-coryambasis,” the audience quivers all over, and murmurs: “That’s just how I feel myself.”

        Which is the dismal, long-drawn-out comedy of the death-bed of the serious novel. It is self-consciousness picked into such fine bits that the bits are most of them invisible, and you have to go by smell.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous
      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Let us just for the moment feel the pulses ofUlyssesand of Miss Dorothy Richardson and M. Marcel Proust . . . IsUlyssesin his cradle? Oh, dear! What a grey face! . . . And M. Proust? Alas! You can hear the death-rattle in their throats. They can hear it themselves. They are listening to it with acute interest, trying to discover whether the intervals are minor thirds of major fourths. Which is rather infantile, really.

        So there you have the “serious” novel, dying in a very long-drawn-out fourteen-volume death-agony, and absorbedly, childishly interested in the phenomenon “Did I feel a twinge in my little toe, or didn’t I?” asks every character of Mr. Joyce or of Miss Richardson or M. Proust. Is my aura a blend of frankincense and orange pekoe and boot-blacking, or is it myrrh and bacon-fat and Shetland tweed? The audience round the death-bed gapes for the answer. And when, in a sepulchral tone, the answer comes and length, after hundreds of pages: “It is none of these, it is abysmal chloro-coryambasis,” the audience quivers all over, and murmurs: “That’s just how I feel myself.”

        Which is the dismal, long-drawn-out comedy of the death-bed of the serious novel. It is self-consciousness picked into such fine bits that the bits are most of them invisible, and you have to go by smell.

        And to take it full circle, Henry Miller said his primary aspiration was to be the 'working-class Proust."

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Why were all his books banned?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        They're generally lewd and explicit; poetically, of course. So without looking it up again, it fell under the general obscenity laws of the era.

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >just be yourself bro

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Unironically good advice.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Until you end up alone and realty settles in. Obsolete advice in the modern world

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          The real meaning of "just bee yourself" is that you have to be confident in who you are. You have to love yourself before anyone else will.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          The advice is timeless. Your desperation to fit into a terminally sick society will not bring you happiness or satisfaction.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            It thus far brought me a sense of satisfaction I'd say, but no joy. You might be right about. Oh well I wont be needing it joy is gay, that is why it's called gay.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            about that*

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            You're not truly committing, though. You're roleplaying. A true normalgay would not even know what IQfy is, let alone use it. Now go. Leave this forgotten pit of despair and go and find your happiness.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >if you disagree with me you must be faking
            The worst part about this subhuman logic is that it’s so common

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            My Black person candyass. It's 2024 I'm pretty sure my mom knows what a IQfy is. Whoever didn't know before heard of Q or that guy that got arrested incelposting on /misc/. The internets alot smaller than it was back then It's just a right wing extremist coping forum to them now. Anyway Idk anon I'd rather attempt normalcy and possibly be unhappy than have a 100% chance of being unhappy not doing it. High IQ problems

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I forgot about that manga...that's a good one actually.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I can’t believe someone actually wrote this post. Incredible.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            t. I live my life in accordance to my genetics and cul de sac
            >waow incredible someone can't
            It must be nice with such an easy ride.

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    first coomer, druggie, existentialist and all around cool relatable guy of Poland - Stanisław Ignacy Witkiewicz. Also - Kafka, Proust, i was born in le wrong generation (i should be young adult promissing writer 110 years ago)

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Joseph Conrad

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      They have a thread on him but everyone that responded said he sucked. Why didn't/don't you chime in?

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Probably Kerouac
    Hang out with lowlife buddies, Listen to some music, smoke some reefer, drink some cheap booze, frick some dysgenic roastie
    Write about it later
    YOLO

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Seneca

  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Russian sad man

  11. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    In the past it was Haruki Murakami and Margaret Atwood, but I don't have one anymore. When I was in my teens it felt like Murakami and Atwood were speaking right to me, but now they've lost their magic, and I feel frustrated by their limitations and lack of depth, so I'm waiting to find someone who has that power for me now. Maybe that's the problem with growing as a person - people who once seemed to have magic or power lose it when you can see through it.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >people who once seemed to have magic or power lose it when you can see through it.
      Literal John Greene tier writing. You haven't moved past these authors. You're beneath them

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        nah, you're just a pretentious pseud

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          You can call me whatever names you want, the bottom line is this: when you try to write well, you read like a YA writer, and not an especially good one.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          nta, but I think it's because the pacing of your prose is weak and because the latter half is very indecisive. Also, the entire final sentence sounds like YA prose, because it sounds like someone who just stopped being a teenager a year or two ago. I think a bit of tweaking might fix it, though.

          >Original
          In the past it was Haruki Murakami and Margaret Atwood, but I don't have one anymore. When I was in my teens it felt like Murakami and Atwood were speaking right to me, but now they've lost their magic, and I feel frustrated by their limitations and lack of depth, so I'm waiting to find someone who has that power for me now. Maybe that's the problem with growing as a person - people who once seemed to have magic or power lose it when you can see through it.
          >Edited
          In my teens, it was Haruki Murakami and Margaret Atwood. It felt like they were speaking right to me. Now, they've lost their magic, and I feel frustrated by their limitations and lack of depth. I haven't found a new author who has the kind of power Murakami and Atwood had over me.

  12. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    This is the best advice an artist, or anyone, really, can receive; and yet so few take it to heart. Tragic.

  13. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Celine

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >foutre bite !

  14. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Dostoevsky.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      This. Maybe the timing in my life was just right, but I think reading Dosto when I did prevented me from becoming a nihilist like so many of the people I hung out with back then

  15. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    So many, but probably Yeats most of all--yet still, he and I cannot find perfect agreement.

  16. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Franz Kafka.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/Lbyf4l1.png

      What author resonates the most with you?

      I act like this.
      When I first started writing it was very heavyhanded, but I ended up going that direction he went, realizing I didn't have all the answers yet. Helped me explore the story more thoroughly.

  17. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Alan Moore

  18. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I couldn’t think of anyone but a friend of mine said I reminded him of a slightly more chilled out Hunter S Thompson.

  19. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Huysmans' self-insert character in À vau-l'eau.
    >He realised the futility of changing direction, the sterility of all enthusiasm and all effort. 'You have to let yourself go with the flow; Schopenhauer is right', he told himself, '"Man's life swings like a pendulum between pain and boredom". So there's no point trying to speed up or slow down the rhythm of its swings; all we can do is fold our arms and try to get to sleep.

  20. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    John Steinbeck consistently makes me think "yeah I feel you homie" when I read his observations on the world

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Him and Hemingway for me, definitively.
      And Moore. Moore chads rising up.

  21. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Henry James.

  22. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Lev Shestov and William Blake the most, but I have never encountered an author that 100% resonates with me and I highly value that.

  23. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The old man went to say that the hunter was a different thing than men supposed. He said that men believe the blood of the slain to be of no consequence but that the wolf knows better. He said that the wolf is a being of great order and that it knows what men do not: that there is no order in the world save that which death has put there. Finally he said that if men drink the blood of God yet they do not understand the seriousness of what they do. He said that men wish to be serious but they do not understand how to be so. Between their acts and their ceremonies lies the world and in this world the storms blow and the trees twist in the wind and all the animals that God has made go to and fro yet this world men do not see. They see the acts of their own hands or they see that which they name and call out to one another but the world between is invisible to them.
    ...
    If you could breath a breath so strong you could blow out the wolf. Like you blow out the copo. Like you blow out the fire from the candela. The wolf is made the way the world is made. You cannot touch the world. You cannot hold it in your hand for it is made of breath only.

    --- The Crossing, Cormac McCarthy

  24. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    evelyn waugh, a social climber enamored with the good breeding of aristocrats. and who hated Black folk

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >a would-be interesting person ruined by /misc/ ideology
      Many such cases.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >everyone born before 1930 is ruined

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I meant you, not Waugh. He can be forgiven, for he lived in a different time. Besides, jokes on him. His racism didn't stop me from enjoying Handful of Dust.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >fell for the progress meme
            I can tell by your whiny and effete tones, and unironic use of the racism shibboleth, you're a narrow-minded modern silted up your own mire of contemporary ideas. why would I care what you find interesting? Black person

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            [...]
            >racism is... LE BAD!
            Go back, homosexual.

            >shallow, grasping ad hominems
            >trite retorts
            And you fools think you're enlightened.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            QUINTS CONFIRM

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >too low iq to understand the import of "silted up your own mire"
            >he said da no-no nword so its ad hominem
            115 iq midwit spotted. go back

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I meant you, not Waugh. He can be forgiven, for he lived in a different time. Besides, jokes on him. His racism didn't stop me from enjoying Handful of Dust.

        >racism is... LE BAD!
        Go back, homosexual.

  25. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Emerson

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