What did they eat?

What did they eat?

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  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous
    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous
      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        It sounds very unappetizing, an almost strange combination of frozen and dehydrated foods combined in a way that I can only describe as cruel. But when you look at the nutrition and consider this is before widespread antibiotic use in cattle, this is akshually gains city. I was watching an American movie from the 50's and this 20 something girl felt chilled after falling into the sea and her mother said "let me get you some warm broth" VGH... What happened to us lads?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I've been wondering what the story is behind is behind that, is it just something people hyper-focus on because its so bizarre (tuna jello) or was it actually that common.
      If half the population (women) was home 24/7 cooking, you'd think there would be a lot more than just jello which takes zero skill and maybe meatloaf.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Lots of ads and cookbooks being pushed by Big Gelatin

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          What was the point of restaurants? How did they compete? Were they all serving the same thing? I doubt there was a Chinese place or Mexican food down the street, was it just like one diner per town?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            They had ethnic food since the 1800s dude

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            In NYC maybe, most of the country still has barely any ethnic food, it wasn't common for most americans in the 50s restaurant wise.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            In the 50s you had burger and hot dog joints but Mexican and soul food was certainly around. The Chinese have been here for centuries. They had restaurants.

            Frankly I would rather we had more of that as opposed to more fricking Pho joints

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >more fricking Pho joints
            Lemme guess, SoCal?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Nah man, Midwest.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Vietnamese restaurants in California prior to the Vietnam boat people
            why are flyover hicks so moronic

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            it was only like 50/50 at that point in terms of urbanisation, so i have my doubts about that claim.
            i don't think small town USA had a Great Wall Buffet

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            The little town I grew up in had a Chinese buffet that was pretty old. It would depend on the demographics. I'm not saying they were everywhere but they certainly existed.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Basically it was a status symbol. In the pre-industrial era, producing gelatin was a long and laborious process, not to mention the fact that you needed access to refrigeration to make shit with it in the first place, so being able to serve it meant that you had money and servants. Then instant gelatin appeared and suddenly every housewife could pull it off. What people forget about the whole muh 50s trad wife era was how wildly popular the concepts of efficiency, modernity and streamlining household tasks were, look at any advert for any household appliance from that time and these themes constantly pop up. Jello molds were quick and easy to make, streamlined, ergonomic and relatively mess-free, while looking impressive and a little fantastical. That made them much more appealing to fashionable housewives of the time than something which required unprocessed ingredients, time and effort.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Very interesting, thanks!

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The original, hip, recipe is calle aspic. It was a russian dish, that russian refugees introduce in Paris restaurants, in the 20s. Time passes and american industry democratice the cool recipe.

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Affordable food.

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    What the frick? Do none of you people know someone who was alive in the 50’s? You dont or didn’t have grandparents? What is going on here?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      1950s is already totally out of reach for most zoomers.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Those of you with older grandparents or great grandparents were adults in the 50’s. 80’s were kids back then. These people raised your parents. They ate the same food you eat, they didn’t have Doritos yet, but they ate all the normal non-processed food and some of the processed food like burgers and fries you know.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Radiochan

          A lot of heavily processed shit
          Frozen foods and canned fish were very popular, also it was custom to have a roast once or twice a week
          Remember the Birdseye TV dinner was new and popular since it allowed families to sit around the electric israelite

          My grandfather ate a lot of potato chips and drank a lot of sugary soda when he was a child.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Most posters here just use "the 50s" as a term to describe their fantasy land where they were paid billions of dollars a year to turn a lever and be given legal right to kill Black folk with impunity. None have ever even bothered to call their grandparents on the phone, let alone talk for more than 5 minutes.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Time marches on. The 50s ended 64 years ago, those who had any meaningful memories are often dead, or have dementia and so on.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Not here. Were we see what we want to see.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >The 50s ended 64 years ago, those who had any meaningful memories are often dead, or have dementia and so on

        yeah good point

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          0/10

          >instant 196 post shitstorm

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          10/10

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      my grandparents are dead now but they were all born in the 1920s. he's probably 15 and his grandma was born in 1967.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Are you 40, dude?

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          His parents could have had kids late. He could easily be in his mid or late 20s like me in that case.

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    roast chicken, mashed potatoes, gravy, and peas

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Adam Ragusea? good taste.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      That looks delicious. Chicken actually was significantly less popular in the 50s, I was surpised to learn.

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Meat and potatoes mostly

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    They ate way healthier foods than we do today.

    [...]

    *10 rubles have been deposited to your account*

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous
  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Pitussy

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Bugs.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Those are some tasty bugs.

  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    hotdogs and coca cola

  11. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    ?si=ExppytPpkwAhQG9T
    J-E-L-L-O

  12. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Most women were trad and still cooked recipes their mothers and grandmothers taught them.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      How do you know that?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        why, do you think after the great depression and war they immediately started eating nothing but tomato jello mayo salad

  13. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Using this persona as a springboard, Bill Bryson re-creates the life of his family and his native city in the 1950s in all its transcendent normality—a life at once completely familiar to us all and as far away and unreachable as another galaxy. It was, he reminds us, a happy time, when automobiles and televisions and appliances (not to mention nuclear weapons) grew larger and more numerous with each passing year, and DDT, cigarettes, and the fallout from atmospheric testing were considered harmless or even good for you. He brings us into the life of his loving but eccentric family, including affectionate portraits of his father, a gifted sportswriter for the local paper and dedicated practitioner of isometric exercises, and of his mother, whose job as the home furnishing editor for the same paper left her little time for practicing the domestic arts at home. The many readers of Bill Bryson’s earlier classic, A Walk in the Woods, will greet the reappearance in these pages of the immortal Stephen Katz, seen hijacking literally boxcar loads of beer. He is joined in the Bryson gallery of immortal characters by the demonically clever Willoughby brothers, who apply their scientific skills and can-do attitude to gleefully destructive ends.

  14. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    American food back then was hearty but not as flavorful or diverse as today. It also was more seasonally limited and used a lot of canned or pickled ingredients.

  15. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Does anyone have those disgusting diary entries and letters from this lad discussing his taste in food that someone posted a while back on IQfy?
    His culinary tastes were revolting, like pasta noodles and actual ketchup...

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Typical anglotards

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >“Like Italian cooking very much—especially spaghetti with meat-and-tomato sauce, utterly engulfed in a snowbank of grated Parmesan cheese.” (to Robert E. Howard, 7 November 1932)

      >“Incidentally—not many doors away, on the other side of Willoughby St., I found a restaurant which specialises in home-baked beans. It was closed on Sunday, but I shall try it some time soon. Beans, fifteen cents, with pork, twenty cents. With Frankfort sausages, twenty-five cents. Yes—here is a place which will repay investigation!” (to Mrs. F.C. Clark, 20 May 1925)

      >“How can anybody dislike cheese? And yet Little Belknap hates it as badly as you do! I don’t suppose you would like spaghetti if you don’t like cheese, for the two rather go together.” (to J. Vernon Shea, 30 October 1931)

      >“Of meats, I fancy I rather prefer beef for all-around consumption, but like most others pretty well. Fond of sausage—especially the old fashioned baked or fried sort. Like fowl—but white meat only. Can’t bear dark meat. My really favourite meal is the regular old New England turkey dinner, with highly seasoned dressing, cranberry sauce, onions, etc., and mince pie for dessert.” (to Robert E. Howard, 7 November 1932)

      He would have loved mcdonalds.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        this sounds completely normal
        t. new engldoid autist

  16. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    they weren't real

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