What is the in-depth history of black names in America?

What is the in-depth history of black names in America?

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  1. 2 years ago
    Anonymous

    They hear Rodrigo De La Marcello and think
    de and la are prefixes that denote nobility.

  2. 2 years ago
    Anonymous

    Uh, I don't think there really is an "in-depth" history. They just come up with some gibberish that doesn't sound "white" and maybe sounds vaguely African, and they run with it

    • 2 years ago
      Anonymous

      > The name Tyrone is primarily a male name of Irish origin that means From The Land Of The Yew Tree.
      > Why do some black people have Irish last names?
      > For the same reason other Irish Americans do — they have Irish ancestry. And also (to Ireland's shame) because some of them were named after some ancestor's slave master.

      >There is as much Irish blood shared amongst the black community in America as in any other community. They just don't seem to be as aware of it. I wish more were. You're always welcome here as children of the diaspora.

      • 2 years ago
        Anonymous

        >Irish
        >black
        >two separate races
        >implying

        • 2 years ago
          Anonymous

          WE

          • 2 years ago
            Anonymous

            >look at dem paddies over there look at they skin man they black man

      • 2 years ago
        Anonymous

        >Irish

        You mean the Scottish.

      • 2 years ago
        Anonymous

        >And also (to Ireland's shame) because some of them were named after some ancestor's slave master.
        More of this bullshit.

        The real reason is because Irish were treated as a lower class, and were also often slaves themselves for that matter, so had close contact with the black community. Tap dance was taken from Irish traditional dance as was Jazz, which derives from the Irish word for Heat. Many blacks learnt to read from the Irish, often Irish monks who volunteered as tutors for them, and so they adopted their tutors' names in gratitude.

        • 2 years ago
          Anonymous

          >we wuz slaves n shit
          no the irish made up the police that abused and brutalized black people. they were simps sucking up to anglos for a crumb of respect since they were seen as low class morons.

    • 2 years ago
      Anonymous

      I think he is referring to the tradition of black Americans having "white" names up until the 70s or 80s or whenever they invented LaQuisha and Quaddarius. And how you'll see a lot of black guys with fairly nerdy names like Frederick, Leonard and Reginald. And even hispanic names

      • 2 years ago
        Anonymous

        That I'm not sure about. I think I'm right about modern black naming conventions though

  3. 2 years ago
    Anonymous

    There are a few different "types" of stereotypically African-American names.
    1. Arabic names became popular because a minority of African-Americans in the mid-20th century converted to Islam and took Arabic names. Examples include Muhammad Ali (formerly Cassius Clay) and Kareem Abdul Jabbar (formerly Lew Alcindor). These names then diffused to non-Muslims in those communities, which is why you can find black Christians who name their children Jamal and Malik.
    2. African names similarly became popular for political reasons, as many African-Americans wanted to feel a connection to their ancestral cultures. Some of these names are West African, reflecting the origin of the slaves brought to America, such as Kwame Ture (formerly Stokely Carmichael). Other come from Swahili, reflecting a general pan-African sentiment.
    3. Some common English names which were once used by white Americans became associated with black Americans, sometimes due to the popularity of certain black celebrities with those names. A good example is Reginald or Reggie, which in the modern US is primarily used by black people, despite its Germanic origin.
    4. Certain French names are also quite popular among African-Americans. Examples include Andre, Antoine, Maurice, and Monique. I have heard that this may be due to influence from the large black population in southern Louisiana, a historically French-speaking region, but I can't verify that.
    5. Finally, many names are simply fabricated wholesale. Many of these names resemble names in the above categories (e.g. Jamel instead of Jamal). I believe these names are more associated with poor, uneducated African-Americans.

    • 2 years ago
      Anonymous

      Are there zero regulations on naming kids in America?

      • 2 years ago
        Anonymous

        a few years ago there were breaking news here in yurop when some american girl was denied entry to an airplane because she was called ABCDE (spoken ab-si-dee) and flight attendants didnt believe the ticket was valid

      • 2 years ago
        Anonymous

        You can't name your kids King, Queen, Jesus Christ, III, Santa Claus, Majesty, Adolf Hitler, Messiah, @, or 1069 in many parts of the country, but a few states like Kentucky have no naming restrictions.

    • 2 years ago
      Anonymous

      >3. Some common English names which were once used by white Americans became associated with black Americans, sometimes due to the popularity of certain black celebrities with those names. A good example is Reginald or Reggie, which in the modern US is primarily used by black people, despite its Germanic origin.

      You can see this in Jamaica, where parents name their kids Garfield, Clifford, Barrington, Vincent, Lloyd, Alfred, and Neville.

      t. Jamaican American

    • 2 years ago
      Anonymous

      This seems right and all but why do they name their kids LaDanian and Shaniqua, and all that? People mock it often but even taking out the racism involved in that mockery it just seems like the wholesale, fricking stupidest sounding names that are in current usage. Why do they do it? Names have power and influence however minutely, how people see themselves and how other people see them.

      Why saddle your children with made up sewage that is openly lambasted by every other culture of english speakers on the planet?

      • 2 years ago
        Anonymous

        >Names have power and influence however minutely, how people see themselves and how other people see them.
        >Why saddle your children with made up sewage that is openly lambasted by every other culture of english speakers on the planet?
        Most of the children named Shaniqua and LaDarius wouldn't have a bright future even if they were named Mary and John. And they'll mostly be interacting with other people with similarly made-up names, so there isn't a stigma to it where they are.

  4. 2 years ago
    Anonymous

    >What is the in-depth history of black names in America?

    Before the 1960s: Anglo-Irish names, with many pockets of French names in the South.

    After the 1960s: A blend of Arabic, Persian, West and East African, and constructed names. People make fun of "ghetto names", but constructed names have become extremely popular among white people these days, like McKeighlee, Jaydein, Braiden, Brynlee, Adalyn, and Zayden.

    • 2 years ago
      Anonymous

      Wypipo making up names out of thin air is just as inexcusable as dindus making up their gibberish names. Anyone who does that should be ashamed

      • 2 years ago
        Anonymous

        All names are made up out of thin air you moron.

    • 2 years ago
      Anonymous

      Define extremely popular. I'm sure they exist but I highly doubt they are a real phenomenon. What I have seen a lot more of is moronic Karen moms intentionally misspelling classic names to make their kids "special". Such as spelling Carly as Carlee, or Carlie.

    • 2 years ago
      Anonymous

      like this anon

      Wypipo making up names out of thin air is just as inexcusable as dindus making up their gibberish names. Anyone who does that should be ashamed

      said, it's awful when whites do it too. I already know what is going to come out of "Braylen"'s mouth, same as I know the kind of shit "Quantrell" is going to spill

      • 2 years ago
        Anonymous

        Come to think of it, I don't think there's a more reliable indicator of a man's character than his name. Sure, you didn't choose your name, but the name you're given does have an effect on your personality and attitude over time. Imagine going through life with some pussy name like "Gage", and that's the name everyone calls you and it's the name you sign on every document. That has to have a negative effect

        • 2 years ago
          Anonymous

          Not only that, but your name reflects the type of people your parents are, and thus give a very broad insinuation as to how they might have raised you.

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