What the FRICK did I just read?

I think the writer attempted to tell a branching narrative filled with mystery and intrigue. It wanted to question and find answers to the burning desires of human beings. It wanted to understand why people need religion in their lives if it limits their “potential.” It had its moments, but this was a sloppy tale.

That being said, I think one of the writer’s main points came through at the end. Despite what we all experience in a life; life goes on. It always marches forward past the pleasure, suffering, success or failures. It always marches on.

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  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    that last part is so true. We assign so much importance to our actions, but the world is completely indifferent.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      lol wut?
      Action is important to self, and outside the self. Have you never encouraged someone? Built someone up? or just helped others? Who is "the world"? Because my world responds incredibly well to my actions. Because I give my actions meaning, so they have value. A non-fungible reward persists in their experiences outside my own.
      Your actions have meaning, no matter what.

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    He writes without plan. He has no idea what will happen next until he writes it down. Knowing this helps appreciating his books I think.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      he should try planning them next time

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        He doesn't like it. He doesn't like to write what he already knows. He wants to be surprised.

  3. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The alternate universe seemed pointless.

  4. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    First Murakami book?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Yes

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        I ask because Murakami is an oeuvre more than a single work. I think he gets over-personal with some storylines, which ends up reading like sloppiness. In the end his books aren't meant to be enjoyed individually; at least half of them are downright bad. Instead it's an aesthetic that you end up returning to again and again like the refrain in a jazz track on a scratchy old cassette tape. If you buy into the aesthetic, the cross-eyed stories begin to make sense with their own brand of logic. A Wild Sheep Chase might be the best example of storytelling I've ever seen on paper, you just have to accept the fact that it's equal parts pulp fiction, softcore porn, a tourist brochure, and nonsense.

  5. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I just wanted to read Air Crystalis instead.

  6. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I had pretty much the exact same reaction as you when I finished it last year. I sorta hated it after finishing it but did respect it in a way. It's a book that I've found creeping into my mind as time goes by and I sorta want to revisit it or some of his other famous works. There's a sort of calmness to the book at the end that washes over you despite there being a ton of questions you still have

  7. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    Just finished After Dark and it was a complete waste of my time. I'm never reading anything outside of the western canon again.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      That's often viewed as his worst novel. If that was your first pick, it's a bit funny for being unfortunate.

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        Don't act like After Dark is some weird outlier in Murakami's bibliography. All his books are the same, there are no real themes, no real character development, and no real plot either, it's all just vibes. You read him for the vibe of some magical realism mystery that never actually goes anywhere, that's all there is to it.

  8. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    That theme is very well trodden. In order for him to be competitive with literature, he either needs greater nuance or excellent delivery. Sounds like he has neither of those. Do people just like him because he is Japanese?

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      My wife and her sister both love him. I assumed it was a female thing

  9. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    What was the point of the tv licence guy?

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      To me, he was Tengo's father's ghost brought into existence by Tengo spending time with him.

  10. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    I do not get the appeal of murakami, the books i've read all seemed pointless and nothing really happened. not even good dialog or characters or anything just dont get the appeal at all
    there are WAY better jap novelists

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      >there are WAY better jap novelists
      I agree with you on Murakami but who are the better Japanese novelists? I'd like to try a few more before I dismiss the entire country.

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        Shusaku endo is my favorite, dazai is also the biggest name for a reason.
        For endo Wonderful Fool, and Silence are two great ones. For Dazai no longer human of course but the setting sun is another one I really like.

        • 1 week ago
          Anonymous

          Not to argue about taste, but No Longer Human has even less plot than many Murakami novels. And no particularly developed chacters except maybe the narrator.

          • 1 week ago
            Anonymous

            Yeah, the difference, of course, being that it's well written

            >there are WAY better jap novelists
            I agree with you on Murakami but who are the better Japanese novelists? I'd like to try a few more before I dismiss the entire country.

            Kawabata

            Just finished After Dark and it was a complete waste of my time. I'm never reading anything outside of the western canon again.

            What is the Western Canon, to you?

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        Not anon but Ōe springs to mind

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      There are better Japanese novelists, but he hits with the length. In 1Q84 it's the story of the ugly private detective, and the killing massage, plus the ultimate romantic payoff when she learns Tengo is alive. In Wind Up Bird it's the days spent in the well in darkness. In Commendatore it's dicky. So much dicky. dicky dicky dicky.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      Try Kobo Abe maybe, I liked him, though I've read him way less than Murakami so perhaps I just didn't grow to dislike him yet in the same fashion.

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