What went on here?

What went on here? How come people don't seem to talk about it as much as the Selucid Empire or the Ptolemaic dynasty?

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  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    We actually don't know much about it

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    it gets weirder,
    - they intermarried with Scythians
    - Yuezhi inmigrated there after their defeat
    - there's R1a and R1b in the area
    - Bodhi Mantra (or however his name was spelled) was a Persian that taught kung fu to the chinks

    Desire to know more intensifies

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Yeah our written sources are mostly the Seleucid punitive expedition under Antiochus (which to be fair is a gripping read) and Nagasena’s discourses with Menander, one of the Kings of their cadet branch in India.
      The Chinese emissary Zhang Qian also paid a visit and was shocked that a bunch of western savages had built such beautiful cities.
      It’s a shame there aren’t more sources, because what we do have is absolutely fascinating.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >The Chinese emissary Zhang Qian also paid a visit and was shocked that a bunch of western savages had built such beautiful cities.
        not surprising since all they had seen was indeed "western savages" aka steppe-like people

        Not sure what happened there.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Similarly interesting is the Bosporan Kingdom, also on the fringe of the Greek world.
          Unlike Bactria where the breakdown appeared to be Nomads vs Settled Greeks / Persians, in Cimmeria the Greeks managed to incorporate a number of Scythian tribes into their state and society. Pretty cool stuff.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Unlike Bactria
            maybe I'm getting things wrong, but based on what I've read, Greeks in that region were Chiefs/Kings/whatever, and when Scythians came they intermarried with them.
            >incorporate a number of Scythian tribes into their state and society.
            desire to know more intensifies, I'm a massive Scythiaboo.
            One would think that settling and integrating into a Greek society would go against everything Scythian, so what happened there?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            You are not wrong, and it’s actually really fascinating.
            Evidence shows that the Kings actually governed two parallel states, one for the Greeks and one for the Scythians.
            As you say they sort of just installed themselves into the Scythian kingship model, but at the same time ran the greek settlements like Panticapaeum as poleis. A really smart approach that stood the test of time given it survived until the fricking Goths.
            >Goes against everything Scythian
            That’s the brilliant part. A lot of the tribes just acknowledged the Spartacid King as their King, paid their taxes, and went to war when the King called. Other than that they lived by the same laws and culture as before.
            In exchange they operated as part of a Macedonian-Style army that consistently could push the shit in of neighboring / rival tribes and got access to all the fancy industry from the poleis and the delicious black sea trade goods.
            We even have evidence of Scythians who were part of the Kingdom fully or partially Hellenizing, whether inscribing steles in Greek or going so far as to move to the city and totally abandon the old ways.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >one for the Greeks and one for the Scythians.
            yes this makes sense, cause everything else doesn't

            >We even have evidence of Scythians who were part of the Kingdom fully or partially Hellenizing, whether inscribing steles in Greek or going so far as to move to the city and totally abandon the old ways.
            Yes this one bit I remember reading about, a "Scythian" born from a Scythian dude and a Greek noble/queen woman. Saying frick it, I'm greek as frick

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Based right?
            And all run by a family of Thracian Tyrants who just usurped the shitter first dynasty. And it outlasted almost everyone.
            So underrated.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Also unlike Baktria we have a shit ton of material culture that survived and Diodorus Siculus wrote about them so it’s a little less tedious. It really is sad how much Baktria and Indo-Greece end up being “look at these coins and speculate”.
            I mean look at these sick torques/bracelets.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            oh bwoy IQfytorical pr0nz, my favorite, thanks for posting it

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            That's very reminiscent of the role cossacks later played in imperial Russia, living unmolested in their traditional nomadic and individualist ways in exchange for military service and personal loyalty to the tsar

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            > Evidence shows that the Kings actually governed two parallel states, one for the Greeks and one for the Scythians.
            As you say they sort of just installed themselves into the Scythian kingship model, but at the same time ran the greek settlements like Panticapaeum as poleis. A really smart approach that stood the test of time given it survived until the fricking Goths
            Do we know about the social life between these two peoples? What I find very interesting is that in the Greek Poleis of Emporion the Celtiberians and local Greeks had separate districts and essentially live in parallel societies.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I personally haven’t seen much, but I’ll take a look and see if I can get any primaries / secondaries.
            My instinct is that it would be similarly parallel, but we do know that they exchanged language and fashion at the very least so I don’t want to make assumptions.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Do you know a good book on the expedition to Bactria?

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          The seleucid one?
          Frankly the best book I’ve found on the matter is pic related. It was an absolute lifesaver when I was getting started on the topic. It’s a nice read too.
          These days you can grab a copy right off Amazon.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Yeah, awesome, thanks anon

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Here their possible descendent.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I thought this dude only made full on ancient aliens micro-docs, but this pretty down to earth
        >the chosen Chad shota
        waaaaiit wtf? based as frick!
        >married at 14
        oh bwoy

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >- there's R1a and R1b in the area

      no fricking way

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      It's Bodhidharma lmao. He didn't invent kung fu tho, he just created a new form of it which was based on his buddhist principles. He then founded the Shaolin monks order and the Zen Buddhist school all at once. Dude was based.

      But he lived way later than the post-alexandrian period. Around 800 years later

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Barely any ruins left(only foundation traces)
    >No written works from it survived or ever existed
    >Neighbours were too moronic to write anything and far away countries didn't care about it
    >Population genocided or assimilated without anyone left by 3-4th century ad
    That leaves the only one source
    >Coins
    Which barely provides any info besides guesswork and king names

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I mean tbh it’s probably not a huge mystery we know how other hellenistic kingdoms were run, small greek minority governing with local sataraps.

      The fusion of Greek religion with Buddhism is the most interesting part imo. Atlas and Heracles becoming upholders of Dharma. The Indo Greeks of Gandhara also kickstarted buddhist statuary

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Radiochan

    I've seen it come up in Japanese Buddhist scholarship fairly often, due to Greco-Bactrian art influencing early Japanese Buddhism. It also may have played a role in transmission of Buddhism to the West (records state that a Buddhist monk engaged in self immolation in the Athenian forum after Alexander; the story of Buddha is given in a garbled form in a work by St Jerome)

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Any evidence for nascent Buddhism being transmitted through it both to and from the Tarim Basin? The fact that the Tocharians were early Buddhists yet centum speakers blows my mind. Also the evidence for the Tarim as the vector for transmitting Buddhism to China and ultimately Japan is fascinating to me. Did Greco-Bactrians factor in much? I basically would like to know what to read to learn more about the earliest stages of Buddhism’s transmission in this area of the world. Do you know what I should read?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >The fact that the Tocharians were early Buddhists yet centum speakers blows my mind.
        same

        >Do you know what I should read?
        no, but I'll give you my thoughts on it, Tocharians had plenty of texts that survived our times and have been transcribed and translated, I found them once, people were saying that they were exclusively budhist text, but maybe that isn't so? Idk, good stuff to research.

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Ancient Pakis but instead of larping as Turk they larp as Greek

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Steppe is a shit land. So don't take them seriously

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I'd imagine for many people with similarly named states such as Indo-Greek, Indo-Scythian, Indo-Parthian they all might as well be a blur

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      For sure. I think sometimes these periphery / blended cultures end up being neglected by scholars on both sides.
      Like I was a Persianist / Central Asia guy at a legit research University and the amount of shit I got for studying the wrong dynasties or the wrong places was really demoralizing.
      Everything pushes towards the most ‘marketable’ areas of research.
      As you can maybe guess from my autism towards the Bosporus I once pitched Crimea / Ukraine as a field of study - focusing on the succession of cultures across time
      >Sarmatian
      >Scythian
      >Scytho-Hellenic
      >Pontic
      >Romanized Scytho-Hellenic
      >Byzantine / Italian / Trapezuntine
      >Crimean / Tatar
      >Cossack
      >Russian
      >Soviet
      >Modern day post soviet clusterfrick
      How much could we learn if we approached from this angle rather than leaving it as table scraps for the Greek Studies / Classics departments?
      Needless to say I was shot down. Still a little salty about it.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >shutdown
        what were the reasons given?

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          A mixed bag of “it would be too complicated to partner across departments” and “no one cares about that region anyway”.
          Basically in my department if you weren’t trying to research Islam, India, or bad things white people did too brown people you were shit out of luck.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            pffft, frick those homosexuals 2bh, they're actual cancer, and should be disregarded completely, follow your dreams anon, you dream big, they dream a globohomosexual cubicle, frick them

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Thanks man. I left and don’t regret it.
            Better to search for what matters alone than for trash with those types.

            anon you're passionate about IQfytory, have you heard of the Persians that ended up in Peru? I might be able to dig the documentary about them if you haven't

            I absolutely have not and I’d love to learn more.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I'm trying to find it but it's a b***h to find, I'll try some more see if there's any luck

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            fml I can't find it for the life of of me, but I'll give you the rundown

            >according to these people living on the islands west to the american continent
            >they were persians
            >they were fleeing from genocide, as they were peaceful people and didn't want no war
            >they somehow ended in Peru fleeing
            >they settled there, all chill
            >they were genocided again, by the natives
            >thy fled again and headed west
            >they ended in the polynesian? islands
            >they chill, there's literally nobody there
            >the now called natives arrive to the islands
            >those persians were super careful only leaving their hideouts during the night time and when there was mist
            >but one of them was spotted
            >next thing you know they're genocided again
            >the natives burn their cave and a frickton of them die in the spot
            >the natives marry the royal line
            >they survived to this day to tell the tale
            >they're indeed blonde and blue eyed

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            anon you're passionate about IQfytory, have you heard of the Persians that ended up in Peru? I might be able to dig the documentary about them if you haven't

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            it does sound like a very large project, to cover that many different culture/identities. your professors were right to discourage you

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I honestly don’t disagree.
            It showed my general lack of understanding of academia’s purpose more than anything.
            These universities are primarily businesses these days, and carving little niches for scholars to go and claim territory both keeps the individuals employed (or at least makes it a little less bad / cutthroat) and on a wider level keeps the business running.
            It just means a lot of peripheral societies will be ignored because they’re too expensive and / or not profitable enough to study. It’s sad, but is what it is.
            Thankfully amateurs don’t have the same limitations.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Indo-Greek
      Isn't that pretty much just the new greco-bactrian kingdom?
      I thought I had read that the greco-bactrian kingdom was the longest lasting remnant of Alexander the greats empire.

      But now I'm reading that it's technically an offshoot of the Selucid empire and that it falls and is replaced by indo-greek but by a greco-bactrian king.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The Indo Greek Kingdom (Taxila / Yavana / Yavanaraja is the easiest short hand) definitely was one of the longest surviving successors.
        That said it split off from and existed at the same time as Baktria, who depending on the era saw it either as a sub-kingdom or as a renegade state and vice versa.
        Here’s the short version:
        >Persians traditionally exile rebellious Greeks to Bactria and Sogdia
        >Alexander does his thing, Bactria and Sogdia remain satrapies but now the local greeks are in charge instead of being treated like shit
        >Diadochi happens. Seleucids consolidate power in Babylon. Satrapy swears fealty to them.
        >Diadotus, Satrap of Bactria, secedes - guessing rightly that Seleucids are too busy with fires in the Mediterranean to go all the way east. Crowns himself King.
        >Parthians follow his example and secede as well.
        >Euthydemus, Satrap of Sogdiana, betrays Diadotus and usurps him as King of Bactria.
        >Late in his reign, just when he thought this king thing was turning out nicely, Antiochus III the Great - one of the scariest motherfrickers in the Seleucid dynasty - finally finishes walking an army to Bactria
        >Shitting his pants, Euthydemus musters his whole army and barely manages to pin Antiochus to a river crossing. Thanks to his archers and cataphracts the Seleucids can’t cross.
        >After weeks, Antiochus’ spies notice the night watch has gone out to get drunk at a nearby tavern. Walks his army across the river while the Bactrians are toasted.
        >Euthydemus’ army gets smoked - loosing as many as 2500 of his famous cataphracts - but Antiochus gets stuck at the famously uncrackable fortress of Bactra
        >Bullshit stirs up with the Ptolemies. Antiochus agrees to let Euthydemus be King in exchange for a royal wedding and a shit ton of War Elephants.
        >Euthydemus’ dynasty goes great. His successor Demetrios Aniketos invades India and starts what we know as the Indo Greek Kingdom. Two Kingdoms, one king.
        (Cont)

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          (Cont)
          >At some point when one of Demetrios’ successors is doing business in India, a noble named Eukratrides (pic related) launched a coup and stole the throne in Bactra.
          >Immediately had to fight and win a war with Parthia, ending in a renewed peace. Meanwhile the indian half of the kingdom remained in Euthydemid hands
          >Eukratides starts a series of invasions against the Indo Greeks to consolidate his rule. Initially succeeds then gets his shit rocked by King Menandros (the Buddhist Greek King that Nagasena hung out with)
          >While returning to Bactra to consolidate, he gets murdered either by his own son, or more likely one of the Indo-Greek princes, and is humiliated in imitation of Achilles and Hector
          “As Eucratides returned from India, he was killed on the way back by his son, who ran his chariot over the blood of the king, and ordered the corpse to be left without a sepulture" Justin XLI,6

          So long story short, they started as two polities under one dynasty, then ended up becoming rivals due to Eukratides’ coup. Neither side was ever able to hold the whole thing for long.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          https://i.imgur.com/K5ErcTP.jpeg

          (Cont)
          >At some point when one of Demetrios’ successors is doing business in India, a noble named Eukratrides (pic related) launched a coup and stole the throne in Bactra.
          >Immediately had to fight and win a war with Parthia, ending in a renewed peace. Meanwhile the indian half of the kingdom remained in Euthydemid hands
          >Eukratides starts a series of invasions against the Indo Greeks to consolidate his rule. Initially succeeds then gets his shit rocked by King Menandros (the Buddhist Greek King that Nagasena hung out with)
          >While returning to Bactra to consolidate, he gets murdered either by his own son, or more likely one of the Indo-Greek princes, and is humiliated in imitation of Achilles and Hector
          “As Eucratides returned from India, he was killed on the way back by his son, who ran his chariot over the blood of the king, and ordered the corpse to be left without a sepulture" Justin XLI,6

          So long story short, they started as two polities under one dynasty, then ended up becoming rivals due to Eukratides’ coup. Neither side was ever able to hold the whole thing for long.

          Fascinating. If not for all the backstabbing they might have been much more successful. Many such cases.
          traditionally exile rebellious Greeks to Bactria and Sogdia
          Were these Greeks who followed Alexander the great and they're being deported by the parthians?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Nope! This was a practice since Achaemenid times.
            >Be Ionian youth in Pergamon
            >Great speech at the Boule today
            >Fired up by the politicians - grab your spear and shield
            >Today we cast off the Persian yoke!
            >Satrap brings a 10,000 man army from Sardis.
            >You and your friends get trounced
            >Surrender
            >Satrap explains that he won’t burn down your whole city and put the babies on pikes as long as you and all your rebel friends do just one little penance for the King of Kings
            >You and your friends proceed to walk to Bactria and are forbidden from ever returning
            They did this so much in their greek territories in fact that Alexander was reportedly welcomed by crowds of Greeks Bactria and Sogdia when he arrived, some whose ancestors had been exiled there since before Thermopylae or the Persian Wars.
            Parthians and Sassanids were much more fond of imprisonment and execution than exile.

            I'm trying to find it but it's a b***h to find, I'll try some more see if there's any luck

            Thanks Anon! I do appreciate it.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            you got lucky, here it is:

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >loosing as many as 2500 of his famous cataphracts
          >loosing
          Good evening, saar!

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Damn my illiteracy.
            Cute bear though, and apropos given this is an India-adjacent topic.

            there sure are a fcukton of israelites here, that's for sure, but you might be right

            I think israelites tend by nature of their culture to be more likely to give a shit about history, but that’s in part just obvious because so many in the west are historically ignorant these days.

            This whole website is a great place for the dissemination of all kinds of propaganda. I also genuinely believe there are psychological/social experiments being conducted here.

            I wouldn’t be surprised either. The whole Atheist vs Religious chimp threads are positively Dantean. Hard to tell if it’s just shitters trolling or something with a hidden objective.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            few things are going on 24/7 in here
            >israel is justified in everything
            >nazis bad and the lolocaust was actually 6 trillions
            > IE bad, white people bad, awful
            >christians are le based, "why do atheists?"

            24/7

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Non-stop, man. It gets so tiresome.
            I wouldn’t give a shit except there are genuinely intelligent people on here with interesting things to share that you’re not gonna find on places like plebbit.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I find it fascinating how many IQfy users seem to take charts/images here at face value and don't question it's validity or the source except when it conflicts with prior beliefs in which case they will reject it without thought. I think it would be an interesting study to pass around fake images and see how often it gets reposted.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            It would be a bloodbath.
            If it justified any number of pet positions (race theory, JQ, Religious Fundamentalism, Fedora Atheism) I’m positive you could get people spouting that the sky isn’t blue.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            /misc/ basically ruined IQfy in general. Somehow when that board was totally lost to Trump memes that turned into actual true believers in batshit, the rest fell too. Is this the inevitable endgame of unfettered free speech?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I worry it’s not just IQfy.
            At least here you can call a moron a moron and leave the forum.
            A lot of people really only have septic bullshit to judge the world on without the callouses and skepticism we’ve cultivated over the years.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Still the best place to have a conversation, everything else ends up moderated by discord mods

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Frickin’ preach.

            Yeah, awesome, thanks anon

            My absolute pleasure.
            Allow me to also shill the free works of Diodorus Siculus. It’s a little ghetto but it’s a treasure trove:
            https://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Roman/Texts/Diodorus_Siculus/home.html

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    They are the current Tajiks, but no country has wanted or been able to do archeology in Tajikistan/Afghanistan

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      many treasures await

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    So close to steppes with easy access.

  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The bactrian kingdom is my favorite historical “what if?”

  11. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    frick the taliban, i hate the taliban

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Absolutely. ISIS/Daesh too.
      So many wonderful legacies we can’t get back.

      you got lucky, here it is:

      Cheers anon, I’ll check it out

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/QDMocpM.jpeg

      Absolutely. ISIS/Daesh too.
      So many wonderful legacies we can’t get back.
      [...]
      Cheers anon, I’ll check it out

      Why do they destroy ancient archaeological sites?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The consider the relics ‘idols’ which are strictly haram in Islam.
        This is because they are Salafis and Wahabbis, schools of Sunni Islam that are intentionally anti-culture and anti-civilization.
        They believe that the world would be better if it is reset to the iron age, except with Islam of course.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      And that is a good thing.

      ?t=707

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Interesting video. The algorithm recommended me a video on drug addiction in Afghanistan and social workers with AKs are rounding up drug addicts to bring them to rehab. Funny stuff.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >social workers with AKs
          that might be crazy enough to potato

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/QDMocpM.jpeg

      Absolutely. ISIS/Daesh too.
      So many wonderful legacies we can’t get back.
      [...]
      Cheers anon, I’ll check it out

      it's always a kaffir pig from some western shithole pretending to care about pre-Islamic history of muslim countries out of butthurt and malice
      none of the people living in the region in OP pic care about the Gayreek legacy brough by Alxander The Gay, in fact they are grateful it was wiped out and replaced by superior civilizations and cultures they take pride in

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >People are interested in history out of butthurt and malice
        Lel

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          it is true some times

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I'm genuinely curious about the logic that brought you to such a conclusion.
            For me every time I learn something about an ancient culture I feel like I'm putting a piece of a puzzle in place that draws a picture of how the world came to be what it is today. I genuinely believe we can have a better understanding of our current problems by looking at the past and maybe even understand our future better.
            Something about the world not having been fully mapped yet makes my imagination go wild and I like to try to understand how people lived and thought thousands of years ago. I don't feel like ancient people's were really that different from modern peoples generally speaking and I think we could learn a lot about what we are capable of doing from their ingenuity.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I'll give you 2 examples:
            1. joomers/golems badmouthing literally every IE thread
            2. me reading a lil bit of israeli torah, just the bit where they got BTFO'd by babylon to remind them forever that they got cucked and enslaved

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I'm genuinely curious about the logic that brought you to such a conclusion.
            For me every time I learn something about an ancient culture I feel like I'm putting a piece of a puzzle in place that draws a picture of how the world came to be what it is today. I genuinely believe we can have a better understanding of our current problems by looking at the past and maybe even understand our future better.
            Something about the world not having been fully mapped yet makes my imagination go wild and I like to try to understand how people lived and thought thousands of years ago. I don't feel like ancient people's were really that different from modern peoples generally speaking and I think we could learn a lot about what we are capable of doing from their ingenuity.

            but other than that, you're right, I learn about IE history because I love it, I enjoy it. But this is IQfy, is full of bad homosexuals with bad intentions

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            [...]
            but other than that, you're right, I learn about IE history because I love it, I enjoy it. But this is IQfy, is full of bad homosexuals with bad intentions

            I guess I could see how a racist would be interested in history for misguided reasons

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            IQfy is full to the brim with that type

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            This whole website is a great place for the dissemination of all kinds of propaganda. I also genuinely believe there are psychological/social experiments being conducted here.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            there sure are a fcukton of israelites here, that's for sure, but you might be right

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Muslims should be exterminated like wienerroaches, what a truly vile religion with zero redeeming features.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >out of butthurt

        Butthurt over what? I can't even get your point.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The buddha statue is made by afghani people who used to worship an Indian man, because afghanis used to be always ruled by Hindus or persians until 1720 AD nothing about this is greek, delusional muzzie

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          read the posts i replied to you moronic poojeet
          also Buddha was a fat frick from Nepal, and the Hindoodoo cow worshipers in Afghanistan are not the same race as the untouchable dravidian scum in Pooland

  12. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    If Derek from HAP is here I want to say keep up the good work!

  13. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Alexandria in Arachosia
    Modern day Kandahar
    >Bactra
    Modern day Mazar-I-Shariff
    The fight drags ever on

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >pic
      extremely close range setup, me lieky

      >- there's R1a and R1b in the area

      no fricking way

      dig a haplomap and see for yourself, it's not surprising, but it is kind of intriguing, would love to know which precise migrations/cultures contributed to it

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >dig a haplomap and see for yourself
        It was a joke.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Hopefully someday these cities will get their true names back

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        lol Gayreeks can't even change back the name of Istanbul

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Brits held ustanbul for 4 years

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Hopefully someday these cities will get their true names back

      To be fair, Kandahar is just a bastardization of the old name.
      >Alexandria (Greek)
      >Iskandar (Persian)
      >Kandahar (Pashto)
      This was at least the case by the 1500s.
      >”Those who go from Persia, from the kingdom of Horaçam (Khorasan), from Bohára, and all the Western Regions, travel to the city which the natives corruptly call Candar, instead of Scandar, the name by which the Persians call Alexander."
      —João de Barros, 1552 AD

  14. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    tons of shit went on here;
    the oxus river was one of the primordial sites of spontaneous civilization, along with mesopotamia, the yellow river, mesoamerica, etc.
    it was the hub of eurasian trade for 2500 fricking years.
    some of the richest cities to ever exist developed here.
    Genghis fricking Khan almost single-handedly wiped this entire region off the map of civilization from then to NOW.

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