What's the appeal of James Joyce?

What's the appeal of James Joyce? I've never read him, but I am just curious on your thoughts and which book you'd recommend of his first

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I have only read Dubliners, the shorts stories I pretty good. I read the next book in the Joyce Canon, Portrait of the Artist. I read the first sentence, got annoyed at how much of a homosexual he was, and put the book down. Never read any more Joyce after that and if that singular sentence is indicative of what I am going to be missing I never will.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Smart man

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >I read the first sentence
      For what it's worth, the first few pages of Portrait are weird and wonky then it settles into Dubliners-esque prose

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        How about Ulysses and and Finnegan's? If Portrait moves away from that style of writing I might finish it in the future.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Joyce attempts to represent Stephen's mind in the style of writing and the style changes as Stephen gets older

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          If you hated the wonky writing of the first few pages of Portrait then you'd hate Ulysses and especially Finnegan's Wake.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          You need to read finnegans wake out loud because some words are identifiable if you pronounce it altogether. But even then you wont still get much thing from that novel because it jumps from one fragment to another.
          Currently reading that book, I'm on page 100(?) And the only thing that I learned is that there's this museum, museum presentation, some guards saying mister finnegens sir, some prankster woman, then it jumps to some battle records, then king something. I cant get the grasp of the story so far

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I bought it months ago and read a few sentences and gave up lol. Good luck

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I read it all last summer just letting it wash over me not comprehending a single thing. Once in a while I’d refer to one of the reader’s guides, I forget which, sorry, but one from not long after original publication. I’m pretty moronic but it was compelling enough to read all the way through, also I avoided reading it aloud in public like an insane person. I like the part where it’s like a radio quiz show

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I usually read FW in my bedroom, before I sleep, because that's the only 'free time' that I have in my corposlave week. Sometimes I got too tired to even finish a single page of it, stopped mid paragraph and go to sleep.
            Finnegans wake is a fun read, but its not worth to tire yourself over it, that's for sure

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Portrait moves away from that style that's kind of the main point: that he's a child and then an insufferable adolescent and that's how words in the mind of a child and an insufferable adolescent sound like. The book is technically very strong in showing you how inner voice evolves through several stages of awareness until he becomes an artist.
          Ulysses has the best prose in all of modern literature. It is not like Portrait and it is not like Dubliners, and it tops them both.
          If you do not like writing that sounds like thought, then maybe you won't enjoy those - but as an argument for reading these two books: writing does not convey meaning only by what the words are referencing, but also from its tone. If you are interesting in exploring how tone (among other things) can also set meaning in writing, Joyce is the guy to read.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Just read it. The time you will spend checking this thread would already be enough to read the first story.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Epiphany

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    He had the greatest grasp of the English language of any human being ever to live and was raised in an extremely intellectual environment which allowed him to absorb and operate within a coherent system of aesthetics. He was therefore able to write the densest novels of all time. Finnegans Wake is so dense that the individual reader can barely grasp it, the problem of simply reading the book had to be crowdsourced. You read Joyce to see what is possible, even if you don't care to hear what he has to say.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Let's assume I understand his words: is the content any good?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        The form is the content. He's not a philosopher, he's an artist. He does a better job than any other author of portraying how a specific type of person saw a specific place at a specific time.
        As far as "content" goes, he has some excellent points about Catholicism and artistic detachment in Potrait of the Artist, his most accessible novel. He also puts forward an aesthetic theory based on Aristotle and Aquinas which is unparalleled. But novels aren't philosophy, if you want to read someone making "points" you can do something with, read Nietzsche or something. Novels are an aesthetic experience.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Are his points about catholicism excellent because you agree with his anti-catholicism?

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    he insists upon himself

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    He's the only modernist who was hopeful about the future. He's the modernist our current elite need, not all the other whiny reactionaries crying about how western civ is circling the drain closer and closer even back then.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >reading portrait in bed, enjoying it a lot
    >stephen has just seen a prostitute, that's cool
    >decide to read a bit more that night
    >mfw that scene starts

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      what scene? I've read the first half of Portrait multiple times but always get bored and drop it once he starts going on and on about his guilt from seeing prostitutes. I want to have a reason to actually finish the damn thing.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Maybe the scene where the priest goes on a whole tangent about Hell while they're on their retreat? That has some pretty intense imagery.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >reading portrait after dubliners which ends with The Dead
    >A big part of his character in Portrait is the realization of his baneful bond towards women, both as prostitutes and saints
    >look up Author's life
    >he was in a stable life long relationship since his early 20s
    Frick you Joyce.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      He only felt that way because he thought that in a socially repressive environment such as Ireland it was impossible to truly love a woman

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Pity he wasn't born today, he would have met his wife through onlyfans I'm sure.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          The frick are you whining about?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            just some sexless freak that thinks that all women would be better off in a Bhurka.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

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  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I read Dubliners, didn't care for it, and never tried any of his other work.

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Ulysses is a story about how someone can be a hero in Modernity. That's its essence if you boil it down to the fundamentals. It's the story of a man--Leopold Bloom--who is not really very special, rather ordinary in some respects, but who nonetheless has a few choice qualities which make him unable to be caught up in the world of his day, which make him stand apart. The book is the story of his day, his single day June 16th in Dublin, Ireland, and how the world he encounters attempts to defeat him. But Bloom triumphs in the end, and the dilemmas he faces--the loss of his home and the loss of his wife--are triumphed over by the book's final words.

    The styles themselves become part of the world attempting to triumph against Bloom; they gradually take on a hostile attitude towards him, and attempt to subsume him and control him. David Hayman talks about this. But Bloom triumphs over the machinations of his own novel by the end, too.

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