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What's the big deal?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >le depressed vatnik christcuck
    It's tailor made for incel chuds.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Incel chud here, crime and Punishment is superior in every sense.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        le religion is based? idk I haven't read much beyond the first couple chapters.

        I liked Crime and Punishment too also Notes from the Underground.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Types in barely understandable buzzwords
      You just got filtered. Learn proper English first.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It's an interesting overview of various aspects of Russian society in a particular time period. It also explore ideas about things like faith, free will, morality, etc. At the time it was written, it was somewhat groundbreaking to claim that married women were essentially the same as prostitutes because at the end of the day they had the same goals (to take care of themselves and live comfortable lives). Today, ideas like that aren't so groundbreaking, so they might seem more boring to read about.

    On a personal level, I love this novel because it has basically zero likeable characters.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >zero likeable characters
      But anon... every character is literally me...

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Same actually. That's why I like it so much.

    • 1 month ago
      Elliot's Husband

      >because it has basically zero likeable characters.
      Old patriarch Karamazov is very based.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        If nothing else he's actually quite funny.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >On a personal level, I love this novel because it has basically zero likeable characters.
      you don't like alyosha? dmitri and fyodor are shitheads but they're entertaining.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      > zero likeable characters
      I like alyosha tbqh

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Grand inquisitor

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    demons and c&p are both better.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    If you are alluding to Dostoevsky’s worst novels, then, indeed, I dislike intensely The Brothers Karamazov and the ghastly Crime and Punishment rigamarole. No, I do not object to soul-searching and self-revelation, but in those books the soul, and the sins, and the sentimentality, and the journalese, hardly warrant the tedious and muddled search. Dostoyevsky’s lack of taste, his monotonous dealings with persons suffering with pre-Freudian complexes, the way he has of wallowing in the tragic misadventures of human dignity – all this is difficult to admire. I do not like this trick his characters have of ”sinning their way to Jesus” or, as a Russian author, Ivan Bunin, put it more bluntly, ”spilling Jesus all over the place." Crime and Punishment’s plot did not seem as incredibly banal in 1866 when the book was written as it does now when noble prostitutes are apt to be received a little cynically by experienced readers. Dostoyevsky never really got over the influence which the European mystery novel and the sentimental novel made upon him. The sentimental influence implied that kind of conflict he liked—placing virtuous people in pathetic situations and then extracting from these situations the last ounce of pathos. Non-Russian readers do not realize two things: that not all Russians love Dostoevsky as much as Americans do, and that most of those Russians who do, venerate him as a mystic and not as an artist. He was a prophet, a claptrap journalist and a slapdash comedian. I admit that some of his scenes, some of his tremendous farcical rows are extraordinarily amusing. But his sensitive murderers and soulful prostitutes are not to be endured for one moment—by this reader anyway. Dostoyevsky seems to have been chosen by the destiny of Russian letters to become Russia’s greatest playwright, but he took the wrong turning and wrote novels.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Don't you realize you need to substantiate the claims you're making? Yes he deals with fraught personalities or "pre-Freudian complexes" as you say, but why is this monotonous? By my estimation it's the best aspect of his novel. The long drawn out interrogation scene is a masterclass in this. What in particular is your issue with the novel? I could agree that it's not as tight as it might have been, and there are weaker moments, but as I said above the characterization and thematic exploration more than holds up.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >why is this monotonous?

        Not that anon, but the monotony in Karamazov comes from the constant walking back and forth to deliver letters to people. A good 150 pages is just Alyosha walking from from house to the next without anything insightful or interesting happening.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I think his criticism is absolutely devastating to Dosto. If you read Dosto's novels, they are chock full of a grotesque macabre fascination with suffering and shame, with murder and sex and the subsequent groveling misery of those who find themselves in such situations. This type of tripe is 100% on the level of a typical harlequin romance novel, but because it's some old Russian who added Christian Orthodox themes as an accent to the sadomasochism, IQfy eats it up. It's perverse.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Never understood why English readers would fawn over Dostoevsky when they have Dickens. Dickens does the same thing of putting good characters in terrible circumstances only from them to reflect something of Christ in how they navigate their situation. He just does this with much greater humor and pathos. He's also one the greatest prose stylists to ever live, wheres even the biggest champions of Dostoevsky will admit that his prose leaves something to be desired.

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