which way western man

which way western man

A Conspiracy Theorist Is Talking Shirt $21.68

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A Conspiracy Theorist Is Talking Shirt $21.68

  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Fricking OP's fat mom whilr he cries in a corner and draws wojaks.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Not OP but this brings back a lot of sad menories.

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >doas
    >soad

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      WAKE UP

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        WHY DONT YOU PUT ON A LITTLE MAKEUP!

  3. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    doas is broken on anything but OpenBSD. There's 2 completely different projects porting it over to the rest of *NIX and both of them are terrible. The one FreeBSD uses is somewhat okay, and the one most Linux distros use (OpenDoas) has been abandoned for like 2-3 years from a now >6 year old version of doas. I haven't investigated the FreeBSD version, but OpenDoas rips out most of the BSD authentication framework, replaces it for PAM, and ports over the basics from libopenbsd to get it to work. If it was a toy program that primarily works in non-root mode, being abandoned doesn't really matter all too much, but being the gatekeeper to all root functionality, abandonment = avoid. It also doesn't help that security by obscurity can be at play here, as there's not enough mindshare for doas.

    Legitimately anyone shilling doas doesn't understand how the *BSD/NIX world works, and just think that simple = good without spending a single second understanding why such a simple program needed to be ported over to operating systems that aren't OpenBSD in the first place. KYS OP for starting such a discussion.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Was using doas because it's comfy and the config is easy
      >Read
      >Check Debian Sid package info
      >Last upstream update was in 2022 and there's a CVE which current version is vulnerable to

      Fug.
      https://security-tracker.debian.org/tracker/source-package/opendoas

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        update your kernel

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I'm on kernel 6.8.11

          > running commands as another user (with a tty attached like when running interactively), allows that user to take over the current user running OpenDoas.
          nothing burger

          the point is that thing hasn't been updated in 2 years and who knows what exploits might be out in the wild that will never get fixed because nobody even cares to check on it

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >I'm on kernel 6.8.11
            Then it doesn't affect you, see https://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/torvalds/linux.git/commit/?id=8d1b43f6a6df7bcea20982ad376a000d90906b42

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >The security problem mitigated is similar to the security risks caused by TIOCSTI, which, since kernel 6.2, can be disabled with CONFIG_LEGACY_TIOCSTI=n.
            that's the one you need for the doas "exploit". It can be disabled, and if your worried about it then do so, but it isn't by default.

            I'm on kernel 6.8.11
            [...]
            the point is that thing hasn't been updated in 2 years and who knows what exploits might be out in the wild that will never get fixed because nobody even cares to check on it

            >who knows what exploits might be out in the wild
            probably none? its incredibly simple code, all the exploits will be dumb exploits like this one.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >the point is that thing hasn't been updated in 2 years and who knows what exploits might be out in the wild
            moronic updooter.
            The project is not abandoned. [1]
            Nothingburger CVE == disable the syscall and recompile the kernel if you care.
            It's a bad syscall that Theo has called out before [2] and OpenBSD doesn't even have it anymore.
            [1] https://github.com/Duncaen/OpenDoas/issues/106
            [2] https://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20170701132619

            doas is broken on anything but OpenBSD. There's 2 completely different projects porting it over to the rest of *NIX and both of them are terrible. The one FreeBSD uses is somewhat okay, and the one most Linux distros use (OpenDoas) has been abandoned for like 2-3 years from a now >6 year old version of doas. I haven't investigated the FreeBSD version, but OpenDoas rips out most of the BSD authentication framework, replaces it for PAM, and ports over the basics from libopenbsd to get it to work. If it was a toy program that primarily works in non-root mode, being abandoned doesn't really matter all too much, but being the gatekeeper to all root functionality, abandonment = avoid. It also doesn't help that security by obscurity can be at play here, as there's not enough mindshare for doas.

            Legitimately anyone shilling doas doesn't understand how the *BSD/NIX world works, and just think that simple = good without spending a single second understanding why such a simple program needed to be ported over to operating systems that aren't OpenBSD in the first place. KYS OP for starting such a discussion.

            So much misinformation here.
            slicer69's variant (used by FreeBSD) is worse than opendoas [3].
            FreeBSD abandoned BSDAuth in favor of PAM themselves.
            You don't need PAM to use opendoas (./configure --without-pam).
            >It also doesn't help that security by obscurity can be at play here
            Also applies to OpenBSD doas - not an argument.
            >understanding why such a simple program needed to be ported over to operating systems that aren't OpenBSD in the first place
            Plenty of programs have been ported over from OpenBSD to Linux, including:
            >sudo
            Yes sudo was an OpenBSD project originally.
            >openssh
            Just don't patch systemd into it unless you want Jia Tan to ravage your anus 😉
            >openbsd-netcat
            Preferred these days because hobbit (the original) and GNU netcat are abandoned.
            >libressl
            Still used in Linux for libtls.
            >openntpd
            >pax
            Most Linux distros' implementation comes from MirBSD, which is itself an OpenBSD fork.
            >mksh
            Also MirBSD, hence similar to pdksh.

            [3] https://bbs.archlinux.org/viewtopic.php?id=263185

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            This is probably the first time I see a IQfy post with in-line citation indexes and I've been here since 2007
            I kneel, autismo anon. Thank you for the info

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        > running commands as another user (with a tty attached like when running interactively), allows that user to take over the current user running OpenDoas.
        nothing burger

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      So this trash is what IQfy is shilling. Guess Linux users need to bear with their incredibly bloated sudo garbage.

  4. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >over 220k lines of code to run a 4 word command
    Is western man ok? The frick were they thinking?
    And then they blame jeets for bloated software lol

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      This is normal on Linux. "Standard" desktop Linux is actually pretty fricking bloated. macOS is probably more lightweight.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >macOS is probably more lightweight
        you're talking about an OS where the init system is configured in XML

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          systemd depends on dbus, which uses xml as part of its protocol.

  5. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    sudo never made me reinstall my system after it locked my user out of elevated privileges

    doas: solving a problem that doesn't exist

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >reinstall my system after it locked my user out of elevated privileges

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      What kind of moron are you, exactly?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      You're just moronic.

  6. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    sudo wasnt even even installed on debian netinst. so i installed doas just for couple commands i wanted to run as user

  7. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    alias doas='sudo'

  8. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    su is better

  9. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    why are we still using multi-user operating systems in the current year?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Good question

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Good question

      >Friend wants to work on your system fir a day
      >create new user
      >can use without seeing my porn, memes, posts, cookies, history and manisfesto
      Multi user systems are comfy as frick.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        wants to work on your system fir a day
        It's the current year, if that moron doesn't have a laptop, it's his fault.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        wants to work on your system fir a day
        When has this ever happened anon

  10. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    systemd-run0 saar

  11. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Neither. su - requires knowing a password other than your low-priv account. Reduces risk of phishing. If a person can't be trusted with the root password then they certainly cant be trusted with sudo/doas. sudo and doas are for the secretary to restart some crap application on the weekend since nobody configured either of them properly. As an example do sudo -n id and many will be passwordless root, as will my script that some of you would run blindly.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Why GNU `su' does not support the `wheel' group
      ===============================================

      (This section is by Richard Stallman.)

      Sometimes a few of the users try to hold total power over all the
      rest. For example, in 1984, a few users at the MIT AI lab decided to
      seize power by changing the operator password on the Twenex system and
      keeping it secret from everyone else. (I was able to thwart this coup
      and give power back to the users by patching the kernel, but I wouldn't
      know how to do that in Unix.)

      However, occasionally the rulers do tell someone. Under the usual
      `su' mechanism, once someone learns the root password who sympathizes
      with the ordinary users, he or she can tell the rest. The "wheel
      group" feature would make this impossible, and thus cement the power of
      the rulers.

      I'm on the side of the masses, not that of the rulers. If you are
      used to supporting the bosses and sysadmins in whatever they do, you
      might find this idea strange at first.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        reincarnation of Karl Marx and just as weird too

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >if we steal the admin password we should be allowed to be admins now
        this fricking toe fungus eater's ideas make sense when you realize he lives in a fantasy hyper high trust society. maybe theres some ancient 1985 mainframe accessible by professors at MIT where he lives in his office that is still a 'high trust' system and he's autistic and thinks this is the entire world and we should base our ideologies on this system.

  12. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >western man
    is that the politically correct way of saying troony?

  13. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    systemd-run

  14. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    doas.
    I still don't know how to write a sudoers file despite using linux with sudo for about 4-5 of the roughly 8 years of total linux time I have.
    The doas.conf file is stupid easy, to bad I'm more stupider, I still need to rtfm even though I've writ a dozen of them.

  15. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Just use doas

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >gentoo
      opinion discarded

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        whatever you say

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Where do you think you are?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >gentoo
      >le lambda prompt
      >le unbloated alternative to an industry standard command
      yep the unemployment flags check out

  16. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    this is reversed. sudo is normal, doas, run0 and all others are for homosexuals

  17. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I'll use doas when they have sudoedit replacement

  18. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I use doas when I have commands that need elevated privileges to be run as non root users within scripts, like automatically launching some script with privileges. This way I can whitelist the command with doas to not require a password
    Otherwise, I prefer to just su, since I'm usually running more than one command at a time if I'm ever fricking with elevated privileges

  19. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    i always run root

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I’m gonna run my root in your dark brown ass

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        i'm a white troony actually

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      can not remember which os was when i tried that, soon after lauching irssi other users ridiculed my choice as unprofessional

  20. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    run as administrator

  21. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Who here pronounces it “sue doe” instead of “sue do” ??

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      me a few years ago
      t. esl

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I pronounce it in swedish, even when speaking english

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I pronounce it as pseud-oh

  22. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    On my own machines i just login on separate tty with root. At work i need complex policies so sudo is the best option.

  23. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Bussy

  24. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    To the people that have a doas config that is NOT the barebones basic one: can you post it pls
    By barebones basic I mean permit persist anon as root

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Why don’t you just use sudo and stop fricking around with your shit and breaking it.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Why don't you leave the thread about the thing you don't like

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Doas breaks shit

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      permit persist anon
      even more bare bones from a typing point of view.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I pass set env {HOME} for some things where I specifically want the program to read my own config files instead of root's. I find it easier to keep them portable instead of stuck in /

      I also pass setenv {/usr/sbin/} anon cmd ... for some specific programs. I couldn't figure out a way to always set it. If I put it at the beginning statement (like permit persist setenv ... anon) it doesn't see it in the path. I have to specify a program in that path with cmd. It's weird.

      permit persist anon
      even more bare bones from a typing point of view.

      I didn't know this was valid, interesting. Wonder why their example file still says "as root" then

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Typo in the first one, it's setenv with no spaces, my bad

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        (Me)
        >I couldn't figure out a way to always set it
        I found this mailing list describing my issue
        https://marc.info/?l=debian-user&m=163977299003903&w=2
        Turns out that I was wrong - I don't need to set setenv {/usr/sbin/} because doas already sees that directory in its path by default
        $ env|awk -F':|=' '/n:/{gsub(//h[a-z]+.[a-z]+/,"~");for(i=2;i<=NF;++i)print" "i-2" "$i}'
        0 /usr/local/bin
        1 /usr/bin
        2 /bin
        3 /usr/local/games
        4 /usr/games
        5 ~/.local/bin
        6 ~/bin

        $ cat /etc/doas.conf
        permit persist anon

        $ doas env|awk -F':|=' '/n:/{gsub(//h[a-z]+.[a-z]+/,"~");for(i=2;i<=NF;++i)print" "i-2" "$i}'
        0 /bin
        1 /sbin
        2 /usr/bin
        3 /usr/sbin
        4 /usr/local/bin
        5 /usr/local/sbin

        Despite it /usr/sbin being in there, if I try to run something stored in that dir I get
        $ doas ufw status
        doas: ufw: command not found

        $ doas /usr/sbin/ufw status
        Status: active

        Interesting. Anyone know what's up with that? The three temporary solutions that work are adding /usr/sbin to my user path, or adding specific rules for every program I want from there, or doing the full path in the command.

        The only clue of something fishy I have: env and echo $PATH don't agree when called with doas. doas echo $PATH just shows my user path. But that might just be because of how shell expansion stuff works (path doesn't change even if you login as root in a shell previously owned by a user)

  25. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    sudo cp /usr/bin/doas/ /usr/bin/sudo

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I'm sorry but this is a dumb idea if you have sudo installed. Are you trolling? doas ln -s /usr/bin/doas/ /usr/bin/sudo but preferably make an alias so sudo is read as doas by system.

  26. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Non of them, use the root account.

  27. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    sudo su

  28. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    for me, it's

  29. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    very low IQ thread, if you own your computer then all you need is su

  30. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    If OpenBSD supported Wine, I'd never use anything else. Real shame that nobody considers it a priority.

  31. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I'm eastern doe

  32. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I'm an eastern transwoman doe

  33. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    run0

  34. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Western man? India alone has more population than the entire west and IQfy is a global website.

  35. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    >sudo has had more issues. A lot of issues, due to the bloat. Many CVEs
    >bloat
    thanks for exposing yourself as a skiddy

  36. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Login as root

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