Who are your top 3 living thinkers? My choice:. 1. Edward Witten. 2. Nassim Nicholas Taleb. 3. Michel Houellebecq

Who are your top 3 living thinkers? My choice:

1. Edward Witten
2. Nassim Nicholas Taleb
3. Michel Houellebecq

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    me myself, and I

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Nietzsche

    Deleuze

    Karl Marx

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Most “living” philosophers suck aside from Agamben so I’m just gonna list overall

    1. Carl Schmitt

    2. Sigmund Freud

    3. Jose Ortega Y Gasset

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      pseud pseud and pseud

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Isn't Alasdair MacIntyre still alive?

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Kant

    Hitler

    Parmenides

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    "literature" board shows its reading comprehension skills

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Bernardo Kastrup

    Philip Goff

    William Lane Craig

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Joe Rogan
    Lex Fridman
    Dan Olson

    honestly it's tough to only pick three

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      1. Lex Fridman
      2. Lex Fridman
      3. Lex Fridman

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    1. Jordan Peterson
    2. Andrew Tate
    3. Bernardo Kastrup

  10. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I cannot stand the prose of Taleb. If he has something interesting to say, I'm never going to find out what it is.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I cannot sanction his buffoonery.

  11. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Cardinal Robert Sarah
    John David Ebert
    Thomas Pynchon

  12. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Deleuze Pynchon BAP

  13. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    1. Houellebecq
    2. Murakami (not ridiculously good, just doesn't have that much competition)
    3. Me (About to finish 2nd Draft and see about gaining a media presence)

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Murakami has some surprisingly "deep" thoughts about writing. Connected to the idea that you write without planning, without writing "what you already know".

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      you mean murakami the writer? the tokio blues guy?

  14. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Douglas Murray x3

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      to be fair he's about the only one of these "pop conservatives" we have now-a-days who I can tolerate

  15. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    At least you got the >pic rel

  16. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    oh yeah? name three of their albums

  17. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    1. The Father
    2. The Son
    3. The Holy Spirit

  18. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    1. Me
    2. Myself
    3. I

  19. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    zizek
    carlo rovelli
    byung-chul han

  20. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Hans-Hermann Hoppe
    Peter Sloterdijk
    Jürgen Schmidhuber

  21. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    > Nassim Nicholas Taleb
    He talks about the concept of "antifragile".
    What does that mean?
    Yes, I know the definition, a thing is antifragile if it wins from being exposed to chaos, but how is the concept helpful in life?
    You can't predict if you're gonna be antifragile in any situation or not, so what's the point of the concept?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      You don't have to predict. Just observe, categorize, and act accordingly.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        > just dive into situations, and if you're lucky you're going to end up antifragile in those situations
        Is that what he's saying?
        Well, duh, I know that I'm lucky if I was lucky.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Antifragile means not only withstanding chaos and stress but actually thriving and improving in such conditions. It's the opposite of fragile, which breaks under pressure. Taleb says that embracing antifragility can lead to resilience and growth in the face of uncertainty and volatility.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Yeah, but how can you decide to be antifragile?
        As I understand it, you can tell if something is antifragile or not only after the fact.
        You see the outcome and you call it "antifragile".
        My question is: is "antifragility" a mindset or is it an outcome?
        There seems to be a confusion.
        If it's a mindset then yes, you can decide to have a certain mindset in life, but if it's an outcome then it's not a matter of you deciding the outcome, you can only hope for a certain outcome.

        Is it like "I'm feeling lucky" kind of thing, like a leap of faith or something?

  22. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Richard J Little
    Some fat atheist guy
    Jon Kolner

  23. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    1. Elon Musk
    2. Chris Langan
    3. Ben Shapiro

  24. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Nick Land
    Curtis Yarvin
    Hans Hermann Hoppe

  25. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I've read all of Taleb's stuff.

    His genius is not in the antifragile stuff, but in his profound understanding of optionality.

    Take any decision, risk, etc. If that risk has a limited downside, but strong upside, you should consider taking that risk. The reverse works, too: if the downside is extreme and the upside is minimal, avoid.

    One example of a good risk: asking a girl out on a date - downside is she says no, oh well, upside is you go on a date with your future wife.
    A bad risk: letting a magician throw a knife at an apple on your head - the upside is it's cool if the trick works, the downside is a knife in your face.

    You can use this as a lens to figure out how to approach many different problems in your life. As a general rule we take fewer good risks than we should, and take more bad risks than we should.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      It's just common sense... Zoomies have to be taught common sense?

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Okay, now translate a fat tail risk into a probability density function of a t-distribution with ν degrees of freedom

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Gödel showed that all mathematics is ontologically dubious

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            That's not what Goedel proved

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >he teaches that different things have different risks and rewards
          >everyone knows that already though
          >yeah well solve this statistics problem!
          wow you sure showed him

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            The point is that it only seems trivial when translated into natural language, but as a mathemaical model it's highly effective in grasping complex systems with high uncertainty levels.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I think youre confusing complexity of a mathematical model with the profundity of the thoughts inspiring it. Sorry but this is completely mundane info any way you slice it >22998831

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I mean the book was directed towards wall Street boomers so not zoomer's but rather boomers need to be taught common sense, yes.

  26. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    1. Hans Hermann Hoppe
    2. Aleksandr Dugin
    3. Alain de Benoist

  27. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    > Ian Shapiro
    > Tyler Cowen
    > Alasdair McIntyre

    I don't agree with McIntyre's conclusions but I think that he is making headway on the postmodern predicament.

  28. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Nick Land
    I don't know otherwise
    I dislike Taleb because he was like "take the clotshot goyim"

  29. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Can I get a rundown on Witten?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Sometimes named as the smartest human alive, physicist, known for the development of M-theory, an extension of string theory that attempts to unify various string theories. Some people hate string theory though, so his importance is probably controversial and so for more in the theoretical realm.

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