Why arent Austria and Bavaria the same country?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The German dialects no longer exist, it's all upper kraut now. Also rest are a meme too, Frisian is barely spoken and is more of an accent now

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >source: my ass

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Hes right tho, german dialects are vanishing, especially amongst thr youth. If you live in a City you most like dont speak any dialect. Also according to this there's been a reduction of 43% being able to speak a dialect in 1998 to 31% 2008. And that's 15 years ago, so the number is likely even lower.
        https://www.tagesspiegel.de/gesellschaft/warum-dialekte-nicht-aussterben-4088407.html#:~:text=%E2%80%9ESeit%20der%20Nachkriegszeit%20ist%20die,bis%20heute%20weiter%20gesunken%20sein.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Oh and those are East German numbers. It's even worse in West Germany, where its only about 25% being able to speak the dialect, also in 2008.

          Many do still speak the "Mundart" though, meaning they pronounce words different from standard German, but the grammatical structure is almost entirely high-german.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          It's 61% for Bavarians, mostly because Franconians do not share the same dialect group. The percentage for people from lower Bavaria is 87% for example.
          https://rim-marktforschung.de/niederbayern-und-oberpfaelzer-sprechen-am-haeufigsten-bayerisch/

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Not only François, dont forget the Swabians in the west.
            But even in the study you posted only 25% use it at the workplace and other studies, say that in cities like Munich, bavarian will be extinct by 2040.
            But yeah Bavaria is probably the biggest holdout of regional german dialects.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            *Franconia

            But in general only the are around Munich and the one above that sprak bavarian.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >But even in the study you posted only 25% use it at the workplace and other studies, say that in cities like Munich, bavarian will be extinct by 2040.
            The cities are full of foreigners/northern Germans which is the same reason so little people use it at the workplace, it's shunned by our Prussian overlords. I really doubt it's gonna be extinct in 16 years since some parts of Munich are quite provincial with occasional influx from the countryside. But I see your point. Most Bavarians do not live in the cities though and the traditions are still going strong in the countryside. This is the true Bavaria.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Reduced usage and "no longer exist" are not the same.

          If they no longer exist then I've been speaking and hearing imaginary dialects all my life. I can assure you they still are used in the south and Switzerland.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >The German dialects no longer exist, it's all upper kraut now.
      kek, you are a fricking idiot, Sören.
      t. Bavarian

      https://i.imgur.com/TQCbUS0.jpg

      They used to be the same dutchy and celtic kingdom even. Bavaria splintered into several small thiefdoms in the 14th century many whom were among the best armor smiths in Europe, such as Bavaria Landshut or Bavaria Ingolstadt. Bavarian regionalism is still very strong mentality wise until this day. It reunited after the 30 years war. Austria had many incursions into Palatinate Bavarian lands but they modernized their army in alliance with France and Napoleon and managed to solidify their independence.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Depends, west german platt is going away, but south german dialects are still spoken by a lot of people.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >German dialects no longer exist
      They become more rare with each generation but still a ton of youth speak a mix of local and high german dialects. Here in the south west the swabian dialect is still pretty common.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    they were once upon a time. it was initially a margrave (march, place on border used to repel raiders) in bavaria until it was detached and raised to a duchy during a wave of dividing up the vassals of the emperor/german-king. Same thing happened in Saxony, producing duchies like that of Westphalia.
    austria exists to day because of the hapsburgs, and eventually formed its own identity.
    also, moronic question. language doesn't determine nationality. it helps, but it isn't required. the Southern U.S. speaks English just as the rest of the country but many there still love to larp as a separate "nation".

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Why should they?

      >it was initially a margrave
      Well if you go back in time far enough, you can make OPs arguement for many contemporary states.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Because Prussia won in 1866

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    If you literally knew the first thing about history you'd know this

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Don't be a dick. OP is asking an innocent question. Why insult people for asking sincere questions about history?

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    As a result of the napoleonic wars, among other factors, Pan-Germanism became popular in many circles. During 1848, there was a failed revolution to unite the German peoples. While the revolution failed, the notion of a pan-German state became part of the public consciousness. During the late 1860's and early 1870's, Prussia led a campaign to unify the Germans while the Austrian state opposed the campaign since they would be fricked over if Prussia unified Germany. The Prussian campaign culminated in the Franco-Prussian war where the North German Confederation (Prussia and allies in northern Germany) unified with the south german states barring Austria, liechtenstein, and switzerland (if it counts as a south german state). Also, IIRC, when the south germans and North German Confederation formed the German Empire, the Bavarian kingdom was given relative autonomy, which served as an incentive to join.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Many people don't know how "federal" the German Empire was. Only the smaller members of the North German Confederation (sans Prussia and the Hanseatic Cities) got no special reserved rights. Still Prussia had an enormous political weight and was more than able to wield it.

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