Why did illuvater make Melkor the most most powerful of the Valar?

Didn't he know what would happen?

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  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Why did gobbeldyasiatic make gooblyboobly the most powerful of the Gloop?
    Do fantasy slop consumers really?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Why did you click on this thread and wasted time writing down a reply if you’re not interested in fantasy? There were plenty of other threads available for you to post. The way I see it there are only three possibilities:
      1. You want to get people’s attention (probably due to childhood trauma)
      2. You’re conflicted about whether or not you should like fantasy so you try to dismiss it in the hopes that someone will prove you wrong
      3. You actually believes in everything you just wrote so in every opportunity that you find you feel the need to “own” those who you deem inferior for liking a certain genre
      In any of those cases you’re pretty pathetic.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Do fantasy slop consumers really discuss characters and plot points of fantasy literature?

      yes?
      `

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    He did it because he wanted to see the sick heavy metal covers people would make because of it.

  3. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Tolkien said that Melkor had to be as strong as all of the other Valar put together in order to infect Arda with evil. As to why Eru set him up this way is less understood. First of all, a key theme is that nothing, even Melkor, was evil in their beginning — so that means Eru was willing to let Melkor be evil or to overcome that inclination. But, as far as I can figure out, Eru basically wanted Arda to be seasoned with evil in order for a greater, more beautiful good to emerge as a result. That’s problematic because that would mean Eru purposefully let an overpowered monster frick with everyone. I don’t think Tolkien himself ever reconciled this issue.

    • 2 weeks ago
      s10241875

      >That’s problematic because that would mean Eru purposefully let an overpowered monster frick with everyone. I don’t think Tolkien himself ever reconciled this issue.
      Well, why, this is what creates meaning.
      Evil devours itself, but can look victorious. That is why he did not write that Frodo overpowered himself and threw the Ring or threw himself into the fire with it. No, he succumbed to the Ring in the end, but only when all his powers had been exhausted before. Many were outraged at this decision, but Tolkien insisted that this is precisely what is important: it is not the victory that is important, but what you did.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Eru basically wanted Arda to be seasoned with evil in order for a greater, more beautiful good to emerge as a result

      That's what I got from the 1st chapter of the sillmarrion, so all the ages of suffering was a fricked up experiment

  4. 2 weeks ago
    s10241875

    >Why did illuvater make Melkor the most most powerful of the Valar?
    Someone must be the strongest.
    >Didn't he know what would happen?
    I don't think there is a binary yes/no opposition here. It is important that Melkor showed free will, and anyone can do this.

  5. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Because Lucifer was god's most splendid angel and Tolkien frickin' loved that shit.
    He though it was straight fire, bussin frfr respectfully

  6. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Didn't he know what would happen?
    You are viewing chronological causality as a 2-dimensional left/right axis without realizing that Eru (God) is also viewing from the top and bottom, the sides, and diagonally. That's fine, because everyone else on the planet is equally limited by the constraints of the physical reality, but it's the prerogative of an ignoramus to play "babby's first theodicy" when he can't distinguish between the concepts of what must happen vs what will happen.

  7. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Because tolkien like most hacks stole it's ideas from other books.

    In this case, the bible.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Power levels weren't invented by the bible

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        David was a level 999 Balearic Slinger and Goliath was a level 1 ogre, he got got

  8. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    silmarillion ruined lotr for me. nothing you do matters in that universe because if things go bad eru can just sink an island or resurrect the op grandelf who will carry everyone. there are no stakes, sauron's war is a lost cause and he only exists because eru doesn't want to purge him out of existence yet.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      the silmarillion is a book written from the lore of the elves, it contains tonnes of myths that might not actually be true especially the ones told from the perspectives of the vala

  9. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Why did God make Lucifer the most most powerful of the angels?
    >Didn't he know what would happen?

  10. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It’s interesting how Melkor was not only the strongest of the Valar he was also the Valar closest to mortals — in both proximity and mentality. He saw himself as a tyrant with servants and armies and slowly over fell to that level. The other Valar remain distant and aloof, but it was Melkor who was out in Arda being seen and participating in life there even if it was negative. If you were a mortal you’d never get to even see a Valar or really any Ainur but you COULD actually meet Melkor and even talk to him. I wonder if Tolkien actively considered that dynamic.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      he would have turned you into an orc if you had the unfortunate chance of meeting him and i don't think he saw himself as a tyrant, but rather believed that it was his birthright to change the world of arda seeing as how eru allowed them to sing and create it.

    • 2 weeks ago
      s10241875

      >I wonder if Tolkien actively considered that dynamic.
      Well, yes. When the Valar saw the race of people, they immediately noticed their resemblance(!) to Melkor. But this is the key.
      I suspect (not entirely sure) that in cosmological terms, humans may collectively become what Melkor could have been had he not fallen. People and Elves do not escape from the evil tyrant Morgoth (and his servants), but themselves become the salvation of the Universe as a whole.

  11. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The bigger the pride, the bigger the fall. Plus all the peoples of Middle Earth and the Valar could learn the power of friendship to defeat a common enemy.

  12. 2 weeks ago
    Schizoidberg

    uh oh, muh problem of evil incoming

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