Why didn't WW1 commanders use cavalry in the last stages of the battle to move troops in quicker when the ground had turned into mud and the barb...

Why didn't WW1 commanders use cavalry in the last stages of the battle to move troops in quicker when the ground had turned into mud and the barbed wires and been destroyed?

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  1. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    >hole in ground
    >horsey break leg

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      /thread

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      /thread

      Cavalry and spades coexisted forever, so clearly "holes" are not the reason they became useless. What actually wrecks them are heavy machine gun positions. Turns out horses don't work so well when they're full of holes.

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        And when you "advance" you've simply advanced to the next set of machine gun positions. So no it doesn't get any easier.

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        Just saying "mud" is putting it lightly. The whole western front was a landscape dominated by craters, shredded trees, trenches and destroyed structures.
        And barbed wire can hardly be destroyed by simple artillery strikes - it had to be removed in detail by pioneers, which took a long time. Not exactly a preferred environment for the fast movement of cavalry.

        >Cavalry and spades coexisted forever, so clearly "holes" are not the reason they became useless
        True and specialized anti cavalry earthworks are also as old as time and those were also quite effective at denying cavalry movement. But those took time to erect and in WW1 the concentrated artillery effort of both sides on the western front resulted in a practically accidental anti-cavalry earthwork.

        Can't you follow along at all?
        They can get the troops faster to the second line of trenches that you took before the enemy counter attacks.

        Cavalry units were used by both sides as mobile reserves.

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        >people have to dig holes into a WW1 battlefield in order to make it hardly traversible
        About your machine guns I'd like you check out the fighting style of Dragoons. Horses can also be used as a means to transport infantry if the battlefield has some ground that consists of anything other than craters, mud and barbed wire.

  2. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    >last stages of the battle
    What the frick are you talking about? Do you really think there's a point when everyone just ran out of modern munitions? If it worked like that they wouldn't have been stuck in trenches for FOUR YEARS.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Do you really think there's a point when everyone just ran out of modern munitions
      When did I imply that?
      Battles got stuck because the ground was turned into mud and the defender could bring in reinforcements faster than the attacker could.
      Motorization changed this in WW2. Horsies could've helped in WW1.

      And when you "advance" you've simply advanced to the next set of machine gun positions. So no it doesn't get any easier.

      The 1st and 2nd lines of defense were usually penetrated, but the defender could just take them back. Machine gun positions weren't impenetrable, battles became quagmires for other reasons.

      but they did, and it worked.

      I'm talking about using cavalry for mobile infantry not charges.

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        Can horses outrun machine gun bullets?

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          Can't you follow along at all?
          They can get the troops faster to the second line of trenches that you took before the enemy counter attacks.

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        >I'm talking about using cavalry for mobile infantry not charges.
        Uhhh literally some of the most famous units of WW1 were exactly that
        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_Light_Horse

  3. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    but they did, and it worked.

  4. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Why does his lance have a grip halfway?

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      So you can carry it easily

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        Yes but what kind of lance is it? It's got a pointy end on both ends.... How does it work?

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          It is a german Stahlrohrlanze M1893nA. The point at rhe bottom is meant to be used when sticking the lance securely into the ground, when the cavalrymen would fight dismounted. But it can also be used to strike at people.
          https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stahlrohrlanze
          Here also a 3 part video series about the late German cavalry, which tackles this topic:

          ?si=uCLdm39xdby_RUFS

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            interesting, thanks

  5. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    II Corps deployed across cornfields, its horsed artillery and most of its infantry in full view of the enemy. Men of the King's Own were queueing for their breakfasts on a road when they suffered their first experience of modern warfare. A German cavalry unit was allowed to deploy a few hundred yards away. It set up machine guns, then, at leisure, opened fire, killing the king's colonel and a quarter of his men inside a minute.

  6. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    That was the entire role of cavalry in ww1, and why they were considered absolutely vital to the war effort. They could handle rough terrain, and they're faster than infantry so can exploit breakthroughs. Later in the war germany was even pulling draft horses off of farms, starving the population so they could field more cavalry.

  7. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Most(not all) german cavalry were converted to infantry by 1917, and the horses eat

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