Why do people like the Greeks more than the Romans nowadays?

Why do people like the Greeks more than the Romans nowadays? Normies still read the Iliad and Sophocles but not really the Aeneid, and especially not Cicero or Horace or whoever else. 100, 200 years ago, the Romans were definitely way more popular. I read an anon on here who claimed:
>I have heard that the opposite of this phenomenon is why Pindar is such a niche poet nowadays despite being universally seen as the greatest of all ancient greek lyric poets until very recently. In general the greeks seem to resonate far better with your average upper-middle class urban western liberal than the decidedly rural, puritanic and practical romans.
Do you agree?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    We don't have latin anymore.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Latin is still more widely taught than Greek

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Normies still read the Iliad and Sophocles but not really the Aeneid
    I read these three.

    >and especially not Cicero or Horace
    You got me.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Also the near universal knowledge of Latin among educated people (with Greek being a more specialized field) definitely had an effect. I have an edition of Dante (in Italian) from the 1960s (pre-Novus Ordo) and it has untranslated Latin in the footnotes (although most of it is easy scholastic and Biblical Latin (however Cicero isn’t translated either)), which you just have to understand. If you can’t read either Virgil or Homer in the original (or if you like, Tacitus or Thucydides, or Cicero and Plato) why would you want to read the Roman copy if you can’t even read it without a translation (most of which were/are now (nobody cares anyway so it hasn’t changed much) very bad in Latin since they’re made as just reference material to the original language (doomed to be used as an interlinear), unlike the Greeks which couldn’t assume the reader has a knowledge of Greek)?
    >stop using so many heckin’ parentheses, Chud!

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      (Ignore the “in Latin” part)

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Greek works are for children
    Roman works are for adults
    It's not hard to see why people prefer the Greeks when you look at the perpetual manchildren of society

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Absolutely nothing interesting was ever written in Latin. Romans had such an unoriginal, geriatric culture that they wrote their most important works in Greek, and the handful of works actually written in Latin are childish copycats of Greek stuff.

    People only read the Romans because of le epic Roman Embire meme. If it wasn't for that, those mediocre authors would be a footnote in history.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Greeks have cooler myths

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    If the average person started seriously reading Cicero, we'd have utopia in a few short years.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      What Cicero should I read

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I really liked De Natura Deorum, gives a good cross section of the three philosophic schools that were big in Rome at the time. Although when most people talk about "reading Cicero" they probably mean his political speeches, which I liked alot less, the Catilline Conspiracy provides some interesting insight into Roman Republican history if you're interested in that, but really all of his speeches are mostly just one-dimensional sophistry. He was a great politician, not a philosopher or poet.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Cicero was a slimy, pretentious ambulance chaser.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Doubt it. Cicero was the Ben Shapiro of his age.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      On Duties

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        meant for

        What Cicero should I read

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Latin is by far superior to Greek but Anyone who can read Cicero without intermittently falling asleep needs to go into professional sheep counting. He is the most appalling pedant.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Outside of a few poets, Greek thought outstrips it by a vast margin. And what is of interest in Latin from post-Rome is peregrinating around what was already there in the hermetic/alchemichal et. al. source materials from the Greek.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    You pose an interesting question. I would even say that the Romans are not necessarily overlooked. The Romans more or less copy and pasted most of their ideas from the Greeks, and this is not intended with any barbs since a considerable amount of post-Greek western material has sought to do the same thing. Looking at the what is emphasized on this board there is mostly interest in the Roman Stoics, and even the often here beloved Epictetus could not avoid gushing over Socrates and responding to Epicurus in nearly all of his works. Some Roman material is also more on the dry side, which is not to say the Greeks are bereft of some boring or obsolete texts but rather the nature of the Roman empire made it a necessity to integrate successful operational aspects of other cultures which was always seemingly at odds with its own agrarian diehards, you can look at how Gratian came to power for instance and this is just one example. The foundational myth of the Romans was sort of plain by comparison to the Greeks, Romulus and Remus were tit fed by a female wolf and launched it off, a fair amount of their earliest societal influences show considerable Etruscan presence. The golden age shows considerable Greek influence and once you get into the years of decline the influences become more varied and convoluted. As far as Cicero goes he could honestly be the apex of Roman thought, and I mean this in a transcendental way, some of the most influential politicians, revolutionaries, and statesmen in history have all used Ciceronian thought to considerable benefit. Even the Catholic church in the heyday of its kill or assimilate all pagan thought phase deemed him to be a pagan of such high esteem that he was above reproach. His influence on the movements that have led to the peak of Western civilization is frankly stunning and there may not actually be any other single individual who can be pointed to that has had this much influence. I am not opposed to a Pompeiian approach in this regard and if you like we can flog the people who do not like Cicero.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I would also add to my post that the current mood and climate of the countries that have benefitted from him the most has taken a decidedly anti-Ciceronian turn, which is likely why he is no longer as widely esteemed. For now.

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The problem with Cicero is that he was an apologist for a republic that by his time neither existed anymore nor was worth saving from most people's perspective. Aside from his own social class, of course.

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    People don't care about Cicero specifically because when they actually look into the era he lived they understand even if they might not agree that the republic was not worth saving and so they don't get Cicero because of that.

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Idk the reasons why, but I always found the Greeks to be more soulful and enjoyable to read than the Romans.

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Cicero was a frickin postmodernist..

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Well, that's because the Romans liked the Greeks more than the Romans, anon. They rather consciously modelled their entire culture after them past a certain point.

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The mass majority of ancient philosophy was written in Greek, it was the tradition, philosophy itself was seen a s a Greek way of life. Latin writers like Seneca and Cicero were the exception not the norm.

  17. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Roman works live or die with the social values for which they are carriers, Greek works transcend that because they are great as literature per se. Horace is great though and deserves to be read more.

  18. 1 month ago
    Elliot's Husband

    Normalgays dont read greek either. Stop lying on the internet.
    But I like israelitero and Vergilio.

  19. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >The Ideal was the aim of the single genius, and what survived its work was merely the trick of technical dexterity; and so we see Greek art without the Grecian genius pervading all the Roman Empire, without drying one tear of the poor, or drawing one sob from the withered heart of the rich.

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