Why only Judaism, in the mythological sense, treats snakes as something antagonistic?

Why only Judaism, in the mythological sense, treats snakes as something antagonistic? Since all mythologies treat them as often beneficial, even having queens and kings of snakes? IE mythology, for example, does not treat snakes as such.
What leads to this and what are its implications? the garden of eden?
and why are it often female deities who are portrayed as having authority over serpents?

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Apophis the great serpent in Egyptian myth was constantly trying to eat the Sun, and Ra had to battle him day and night.
    Jormungandr in Norse myth ushers in the end of the world (although in the end this is a good thing)
    Hercules... uhh... killed a snake when he was baby. Dunno if that counts.
    Basically the "destroyer serpent" is a relatively common motif in mythology and not unique to Judaism/the Old Testament.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Hercules... uhh... killed a snake when he was baby. Dunno if that counts.
      That one is irrelevant, what is relevant is the antagonistic Python, slain by Apollo, and the malevolent primordial devil Typhon.

      At any rate, OP is a fricking moron.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Read this OP
        https://aryaakasha.com/2020/12/18/the-queen-of-serpents-the-serpentine-figure-of-the-indo-european-earth-mother/

        No

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Moses’s staff turns into a snake

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Good point

      Apophis the great serpent in Egyptian myth was constantly trying to eat the Sun, and Ra had to battle him day and night.
      Jormungandr in Norse myth ushers in the end of the world (although in the end this is a good thing)
      Hercules... uhh... killed a snake when he was baby. Dunno if that counts.
      Basically the "destroyer serpent" is a relatively common motif in mythology and not unique to Judaism/the Old Testament.

      Thank for the answer

      >As we have observed many times, the predominant mythical perception of the Serpent in the minds of many is that of a demonic antagonist – and a male one at that. There are solid reasons for this, of course: chief among them is the Judeo-Christian baseline that many tend to operate under, where a certain serpent is in fact a symbol of the Archenemy from the Garden of Eden to the End of Days. . And, within the domains of Indo-European mythology in a more endogenous way

      Ok? What do you mean?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        The antagonistic serpent comes from Judaism (in the absolute sense)
        no ancient people treated them like this.
        the classic examples of RA and Thor do not treat the serpent as essentially bad, they are generally specific things.
        IE had serpent queens

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >the classic examples of RA and Thor do not treat the serpent as essentially bad, they are generally specific things.
          Okay, but Apophis actions, if successful, would kill everyone on earth.
          Jormungandr's actions will lead to everyone on earth dying except for two people.
          I can give it to you that Jormungandr is more dubious, as the myth as recorded postdates Christianity by over a thousand years.
          But the antiquity of Ra v. Apophis would lead me to believe it influenced Israelite mythology rather than the other way around.

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >As we have observed many times, the predominant mythical perception of the Serpent in the minds of many is that of a demonic antagonist – and a male one at that. There are solid reasons for this, of course: chief among them is the Judeo-Christian baseline that many tend to operate under, where a certain serpent is in fact a symbol of the Archenemy from the Garden of Eden to the End of Days. . And, within the domains of Indo-European mythology in a more endogenous way

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Judeo-Christian
      Ewww he said it again

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Arguments? 0

        Snakes represent wisdom on an innate level. Judaism is fundamentally a priestly refutation of human nature and instinct. The entire goal of the teflin, their rituals, all their scriptural commands is predicated on financial domination through forcing suburban values via a kind of crude human domestication model. This by denying the mysteries and cycles of rebirth, and the totality of human experience. They in fact try to reform it.

        This should be obvious to you. It has been fairly successful everything considered. The Zionists banking families have significant power and laid the foundations for the modern financial system.
        >Ex Nihilo

        ... le israelites

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Yes.

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Snakes represent wisdom on an innate level. Judaism is fundamentally a priestly refutation of human nature and instinct. The entire goal of the teflin, their rituals, all their scriptural commands is predicated on financial domination through forcing suburban values via a kind of crude human domestication model. This by denying the mysteries and cycles of rebirth, and the totality of human experience. They in fact try to reform it.

    This should be obvious to you. It has been fairly successful everything considered. The Zionists banking families have significant power and laid the foundations for the modern financial system.
    >Ex Nihilo

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    the serpent never had an antagonistic connotation

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Read this OP
    https://aryaakasha.com/2020/12/18/the-queen-of-serpents-the-serpentine-figure-of-the-indo-european-earth-mother/

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Isn't this that arrogant moron who puts himself in a position of pride regarding the maximum knowledge of IE mythology and seems to go crazy with hatred over the question of IE religion being patriarchal or not? his articles;

      "comp goddess x EMPOWERED the hero X"

      "God in the Indo-European sky! yes! it's not a masculine thing dude"

      "powerful queen goddesses duee"

      I don't know, it seems a little biased to me

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        This is called cope, it is the best we have and he presents all sources...
        There is nothing wrong with his articles, what are you saying that lol

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        I'm sure he wrote an article sort of refuting the idea of IE mythology being fundamentally "masculine", but I'm not good at mythology, I don't know how fair he is in his considerations

        https://i.imgur.com/QAXb6Qi.jpeg

        >Ra, the King of the Gods, custodian of civilization takes the form of a cat, the earthly custodian of civilization (he who kills the vermin which sabotage civilization)
        >He slays the cosmic serpent Apophis (the cat being uniquely gifted with the speed and agility to kill it)

        Based Egyptians

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        This is called cope, it is the best we have and he presents all sources...
        There is nothing wrong with his articles, what are you saying that lol

        I'm sure he wrote an article sort of refuting the idea of IE mythology being fundamentally "masculine", but I'm not good at mythology, I don't know how fair he is in his considerations
        [...]
        Based Egyptians

        huh? Is he a reliable source or not?

        The antagonistic serpent comes from Judaism (in the absolute sense)
        no ancient people treated them like this.
        the classic examples of RA and Thor do not treat the serpent as essentially bad, they are generally specific things.
        IE had serpent queens

        but the consequences are all long term, especially in Norse myth

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Ra, the King of the Gods, custodian of civilization takes the form of a cat, the earthly custodian of civilization (he who kills the vermin which sabotage civilization)
    >He slays the cosmic serpent Apophis (the cat being uniquely gifted with the speed and agility to kill it)

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Cool. It is interesting to note that a deity with specific attributes defeating an evil snake is not exclusive to IE, this is an error that I found bizarre in Anthony's book in the mythological part.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >cat
      that is obviously a rabbit

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    because the snake in the garden is not a literal snake

    when God says it will crawl and eat the dust of the earth, it doesn't mean he removed the snake's legs
    it means he took his *wings*
    seraphim is a hebrew word with several meanings both related to angels and snakes, flying serpents are a theme

    the so-called snake would never be able to return to heaven, his domain would be earth until the end of time

    calling this fallen angel a "snake" is a form of damnatio memoriae
    where some angels are named, or otherwise identified, this one has had it's name pushed out of memory and only referred to with an epithet
    it's not Azazel, and it's not Semjaza; it's something else, something which fell before their own tryst with human women

    by the time of the second Temple and Christ, this entity would be called simply "Satan" because that word means "adversary"

    but Satan isn't a name, it's a class of angel
    the Satan we see in Job isn't the fallen one, it's one of God's prosecutors
    that's why we see him in heaven, which would be impossible for the snake of Genesis

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      In short, Eve spoke to the devil himself

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        That seems to be the idea reinforced by the gospels and letters. It would follow that it is this same earthly Satan which tempts Jesus in the wilderness.

        I will note, Josephus himself says the snake originally had legs. This is confusing, since we see hear of flying sepents later in the bible.

        I might be able to explain this incongruence. Either Josephus was simply wrong (this doesn't seem likely to me), or I am.
        OR he was deliberately concealing this information from his Roman audience. It's this last possibility that most intrigues me, though I can't think of anywhere else he might have done this. It is well known that Josephus isn't necessarily the most reliable narrator when it comes to certain things.

        Moreover, I cannot recall ever reading anything to that extent in any of the early Church fathers. And while Philo's treatment of the serpent is allegorical and abstracted, he doesn't digress much from the text. He does however relate the fiery serpents and brazen serpent of Moses found later on in the Pentateuch to the theme of Adam's fall and healing.

        These fiery serpents Philo talks about philosophically in conjunction with the Genesis serpent are literally called "Seraph" in the Hebrew (שָׂרָף sārāf). Well that sounds kind of angelic to me, even if they are afflicting Israel.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          There is nothing 'confusing' about deities and spirits changing over time gradually as they are passed on from cult to cult and society to society.

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Because paganism is the inverse of reality. The serpent in the garden is good to them, because fundamentally all relgions are gnostic.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Exactly!

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous
  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Those who argue that the Genesis writer's mythical serpent had legs naturally claim that the serpent got about the garden on its legs, but there's no textual evidence to support this. Perhaps, then, the serpent was legless and flew about the Garden of Eden. Such a beast, for example, is found in the myths of the ancient Aztecs, who worshipped a winged, legless serpent called Quetzalcoatl. More importantly, a winged, legless serpent is found in the mythology of the ancient Arabia; the legless flying serpent in Arabian mythology was said to have been the guardian of a tree1, just like the serpent in the Genesis story. The fact that both serpents guarded trees suggests that the serpents in both myths may have been based on a common antecedent now lost to history that predated each of them. If this is the first occurrence of a biblical myth based on a lost antecedent, it is certainly not the last one.

    >There was a great Greek chronicler called Herodotus, who lived from 484 to 424 BC. He became fascinated by Egyptian tales of flying snakes.

    "According to his writings, the Frankincense groves were protected by brightly-coloured winged serpents known as Drakontes (Ophies pteretoi). These venomous flying snakes lived in and under the Frankincense trees and guarded the trees from intruders."

    “I went to try to get more information about the flying snakes,” says Herodotus. He ended up in the region of “Boutos” in Arabia, where he was shown a “narrow mountain pass leading to a broad plain which joins the plain of Egypt.” There he saw “heaps of skeletons and spines in incalculable numbers; some skeletons were large, others smaller, and others smaller still.”

    >The description of flying serpents in the desert is not unique to the 8th century prophet, Isaiah. An account of the campaign against Egypt conducted by the 7th century B.C.E. Assyrian king, Esarhaddon, mentions “snakes with deadly breath and yellow flying serpents.”[11]

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Egypt also had a winged snake deity, known as Wadjet. A powerful protective deity often depicted in royal tombs. (See top)

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/oBxsigb.jpeg

      Egypt also had a winged snake deity, known as Wadjet. A powerful protective deity often depicted in royal tombs. (See top)

      Actually holy shit, I just realized. You know, this snake goddess had a city dedicated to its worship like most Egyptian deities. The city was called Per-Wadjet in Egyptian, but to the Greeks it was known as... Buto/Bouto/Boutos. (The deity herself came to be known as Bouto in Greek, too)
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buto

      Granted it was near Alexandria rather than anywhere near Arabia, but I can't help but think Herodotus got confused.

  12. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    "... the pharaoh’s uraeus was a cobra, which we have identified as the saraph. This same uraeus was often depicted in Egyptian iconography as a (two- or four-)winged serpent called the winged uraeus, whose wings symbolize protection. This was a popular iconographic motif throughout not only Egypt, but also Syria/Palestine going back to the Late Bronze Age. This same Egyptian winged-uraeus image became popular in late 8th century Judah during the reign of King Hezekiah and appears on numerous seals during this period.[17]"

    >Two Uraeus wearing the solar disk with outstretched wings, from the burial chamber entrance of the tomb of Amun-her-khepeshef (QV55). New Kingdom, 20th Dynasty, ca. 1189-1077 BC. Valley of the Queens, West Thebes.

  13. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    although come to think of it, maybe having legs would mean the serpent was actually bipedal like us before he was brought low

    that would be kind of kino I guess, has a reptilian vibe

    who knows, maybe it had both two legs and a set of wings originally

  14. 2 months ago
    Schizoidberg

    There's the Midgard Worm in Norse mythology.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      canonically, he's the offspring of Loki Lauveyson. (Levi)

  15. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Wouldn't the simplest explanation be that israelites hate indo-europeans/

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Wouldn't the simplest explanation be that israelites hate indo-europeans/

      snake represents gnosis/wisdom/light within and israelites are hierarchical. Gnosticism suggests that each person can know good and evil themselves through gnosis while organized abrahamic faiths are top down authoritarian/hierarchical and encourage allegiance to the hierarchy? something like that?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        You probably know more about this than me, but I would assume they either stole this from some other society/people (like they stole Purim and a few other things), or they (or their ancestors) had some conflict with the Scythians or some other ancient snake worshipping society. Egyptians were serpent worshippers too, so that might have been the origin.
        https://flexpub.com/epubs/pg57150-images/OEBPS/@public@vhost@g@gutenberg@html@files@57150@[email protected]

  16. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    where do these frickers come in?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      The Western Dragons is just a Snake too. The mixture of Snake, with legs and wings. https://youtu.be/WN56hLnN8Qg?si=fRYnCjYlp2fS2-rG

  17. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Why only Judaism, in the mythological sense, treats snakes as something antagonistic?
    did you forget that the most famous story in norse and germanic mytology, that of sigurd/ siegfried, respectively, involves an antagonistic dragon as one of the primary characters.
    In fact, said dragon was actually a person beforehand, and only turned into a dragon precisely as a result of him becoming evil and psychotic as a result of a curse.
    how tf are you gonna say that israelites are the only people to depict antagonistic dragons

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      You probably know more about this than me, but I would assume they either stole this from some other society/people (like they stole Purim and a few other things), or they (or their ancestors) had some conflict with the Scythians or some other ancient snake worshipping society. Egyptians were serpent worshippers too, so that might have been the origin.
      https://flexpub.com/epubs/pg57150-images/OEBPS/@public@vhost@g@gutenberg@html@files@57150@[email protected]

  18. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Why only Judaism, in the mythological sense, treats snakes as something antagonistic? Since all mythologies treat them as
    Why is it that only judaism treats snakes antagonistically?
    Why does judaism alone treat snakes antagonistically?

  19. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    serpent=descendents of the ancient seafaring race
    eagle=descendents of the ancient big nose tribe from europe
    lion=descendents of ancient blonde/bearded "cro magnoids"

    dragon=descendents of the merger of the eagle and serpent races

    griffin=descendents of the lion and eagle races

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      asian and mesoamericans both worshipped serpents and have significant contributions from the ancient seafaring race who i would speculate to look phenotypically like a distillate of the asian/mesoamerican races if you subtract out the archaic regional components. Probably tall skull and face, crown of skull at the parietal lobe, perhaps lightly bearded, large statured

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